Red Dirt Road (song)

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"Red Dirt Road"
Brooks & Dunn - Red Dirt Road single.jpg
Single by Brooks & Dunn
from the album Red Dirt Road
Released April 21, 2003
Genre Country
Length 4:20 (album version)
3:55 (single version)
Label Arista Nashville
Songwriter(s) Kix Brooks
Ronnie Dunn
Producer(s) Kix Brooks
Ronnie Dunn
Mark Wright
Brooks & Dunn singles chronology
"Every River"
(2002)
"Red Dirt Road"
(2003)
"You Can't Take the Honky Tonk Out of the Girl"
(2003)

"Every River"
(2002)
"Red Dirt Road"
(2003)
"You Can't Take the Honky Tonk Out of the Girl"
(2003)

"Red Dirt Road" is a song written and recorded by American country music duo Brooks & Dunn. It was released in April 2003 as the first single and title track from their album Red Dirt Road. The song reached the top of the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart[1] and peaked at number 25 on the Billboard Hot 100. The duo performed the single at the tribute concert for Dale Earnhardt at the Daytona International Speedway in July 2003.

Content[edit]

The song describes a narrator who has reflected on joyful memories linked to a red dirt road near where he grew up. It describes how the area was where the narrator drank his first beer, found a lover, wrecked his first car, found Jesus, and learned that "happiness on Earth ain't just for high achievers".

Music video[edit]

The video features Kix and Ronnie singing in a truck, in front of a church, and along the dirt road. It was directed by Steven Goldmann, and was shot in 3-D. It was released on May 8, 2003.

Chart positions[edit]

"Red Dirt Road" debuted at No. 57 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart for the week of April 19, 2003.

Chart (2003) Peak
position
US Hot Country Songs (Billboard)[2] 1
US Billboard Hot 100[3] 25

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (2003) Position
US Country Songs (Billboard)[4] 5
US Billboard Hot 100 86

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book Of Top 40 Country Hits: 1944-2006, Second edition. Record Research. p. 57. 
  2. ^ "Brooks & Dunn Chart History (Hot Country Songs)". Billboard.
  3. ^ "Brooks & Dunn Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard.
  4. ^ "Best of 2003: Country Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 2003. Retrieved July 13, 2012. 

External links[edit]