Regius Professor of Divinity

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The Regius Professorships of Divinity are amongst the oldest professorships at the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge. A third chair existed for a period at Trinity College, Dublin.

The Oxford and Cambridge chairs were founded by King Henry VIII. The chair at Cambridge originally had a stipend of £40 per year (which is still paid to the incumbent by Trinity College), later increased by James I with the rectory of Somersham, Cambridgeshire.[citation needed]

Professors at Oxford[edit]

  • Richard Smyth, DD, Fellow of Merton, and Principal of St Alban Hall (1535)
  • Peter Martyr, DD, of the University of Padua, Canon of Christ Church (1548)
  • Richard Smyth again; Canon of Christ Church (1554)
  • Juan de Villagarcia, known as Joannes Fraterculus (a Spanish Dominican), BD, Divinity Reader of Magdalen College (1556)
  • Richard Smyth again (1559)
  • Lawrence Humphrey, MA, Fellow, afterwards President, of Magdalen; DD (1560)
  • Thomas Holland, DD, Fellow of Balliol; Rector of Exeter (1589)
  • Robert Abbot, DD, Master of Balliol; afterwards Bishop of Salisbury (1612)
  • John Prideaux, DD, Rector of Exeter; afterwards Bishop of Worcester (1615)
  • Robert Sanderson, DD, sometime Fellow of Lincoln (1642)
  • Robert Crosse, BD, Fellow of Lincoln (1648)
  • Joshua Hoyle, DD, Master of University (1648)
  • John Conant, DD, Rector of Exeter (1654)
  • Robert Sanderson, DD, restored; afterwards Bishop of Lincoln (1660)
  • William Creed, DD, sometime Fellow of St John's (1661)
  • Richard Allestree, DD, Canon of Christ Church (1663)
  • William Jane, DD, Canon of Christ Church (1680)
  • John Potter, DD, Fellow of Lincoln; Bishop of Oxford; afterwards Archbishop of Canterbury (1707)
  • George Rye, DD, sometime Fellow of Oriel; Archdeacon of Oxford (1737)
  • John Fanshawe, DD, Student of Christ Church, and Regius Professor of Greek (1741)
  • Edward Bentham, DD, Canon of Christ Church (1763)
  • Benjamin Wheeler, DD, Fellow of Magdalen (1776)
  • John Randolph, DD, Student of Christ Church, Professor of Poetry, and Regius Professor of Greek; Bishop of London; afterwards Bishop of Bangor, then of London (1783)
  • Charles Henry Hall, DD, Canon of Christ Church; afterwards Dean (1807)
  • William Howley, DD, Canon of Christ Church; afterwards Bishop of London, Archbishop of Canterbury (1809)
  • William Van Mildert, DD, Queen's; afterwards Bishop of Llandaff and Dean of St Paul's, Bishop of Durham (1813)
  • Frodsham Hodson, DD, Principal of Brasenose (1820)
  • Charles Lloyd, Student of Christ Church; Bishop of Oxford (1822)
  • Edward Burton, DD, Student of Christ Church (1829)
  • Renn Dickson Hampden, DD, Principal of St Mary Hall; afterwards Bishop of Hereford (1836)
  • William Jacobson, MA, Vice-Principal of Magdalen Hall and Public Orator, sometime Fellow of Exeter; DD, afterwards Bishop of Chester (1848)
  • Robert Payne Smith, MA, Pembroke; DD; afterwards Dean of Canterbury (1865)
  • James Bowling Mozley, BD, sometime Fellow of Magdalen; DD (1871)
  • William Ince, MA, Fellow of Exeter; DD; Canon of Christ Church (1878)
  • Henry Scott Holland, MA, Hon DLitt, sometime Student of Christ Church; DD; Canon of Christ Church (1911)
  • Arthur Cayley Headlam, DD, sometime Fellow of All Souls; Canon of Christ Church (1918)
  • Henry Leighton Goudge, DD, Canon of Christ Church (1923)
  • Oliver Chase Quick, MA, Canon of Christ Church; afterwards DD (1939)
  • Leonard Hodgson, DD, Canon of Christ Church (1944)
  • Henry Chadwick, DD, Canon of Christ Church (MusB, DD Cantab.; Hon DD Glas) (1959)
  • Maurice Wiles, DD, Canon of Christ Church (BD, MA Cantab.) (1970)
  • Keith Ward, BLitt, MA, DD, Canon of Christ Church (BA Wales; MA Cantab.; DD Oxon.; DD Cantab.; HonDD Glas) (1991)
  • Marilyn McCord Adams, AB Illinois; PhD Cornell; Th M Princeton Theological Seminary; Canon of Christ Church (2004)
  • Graham Ward Canon of Christ Church (MA, PhD Cantab.) (2012-present)

(Sources: Oxford Historical Register 1200-1900 and supplements; and the Oxford University Calendar)

Professors at Cambridge[edit]

Professors at Dublin[edit]

The Regius Professor of Divinity in the University of Dublin was established in 1607 as the "Professor of Theological Controversies".[12][13] The endowment was increased in 1674 by letters patent of Charles II.[13] The title "Regius Professor" was specified in 1761 by letters patent of George III.[13][14] The School of Divinity was founded in the late 18th century with the Regius Professor as its head.[15] The School's link to the Church of Ireland was controversial after the Irish Church Act 1869 disestablished the church and the University of Dublin Tests Act 1873 allowed non-Anglican fellows.[16] The debate became dormant after 1911 letters patent altered the School's governance.[16][17] It reignited in the 1960s, after which vacancies in the School of Divinity went unfilled,[16][17] including the Regius Professorship in 1982.[18] The School of Divinity was replaced in 1978–81 by a non-denominational School of Hebrew, Biblical and Theological Studies (renamed the Department of Religions and Theology in 2004) although the statutes mandating a School and Regius Professor of Divinity remain unrepealed.[17][18][19]

Professors were:[13]

References[edit]

Sources[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "Wigan, Edward (WGN508E)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  2. ^ "Madew, John (MDW529J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  3. ^ "Bucer, Martin (BCR550M)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  4. ^ "Young, John (YN535J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  5. ^ "Sedgwick, Thomas (SGWK529T)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  6. ^ "Pilkington, James (PLKN538J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  7. ^ "Pilkington, Leonard (PLKN544L)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  8. ^ "Hutton, Matthew (HTN546M)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  9. ^ "Whitgift, John (WHTT550J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  10. ^ "Chaderton, William (CHDN555W)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  11. ^ "Whitaker, William (WHTR564W)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  12. ^ a b Dixon 1902, p.24
  13. ^ a b c d "Regius Professor of Divinity". The Dublin University Calendar. 1867. pp. 247–249. 
  14. ^ MacDonnell, Hercules Henry Graves (1844). Chartæ et statuta collegii Sacrosanctæ et individuæ Trinitatis reginæ Elizabethæ juxta Dublin. [Edited by H. H. G. Mac Donnell.] (in Latin). M.H. Gill. p. 147. Retrieved 23 March 2017. 
  15. ^ Dixon 1902, p.186
  16. ^ a b c Hanily, Sean (1 October 2016). "Church of Ireland Divinity Hostel – A Summary of RCBL MS1043". Archive of the Month. Church of Ireland. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  17. ^ a b c Webb, David (1993). "Appendix 1 – Divinity School Council Prefatory Note" (PDF). Consolidated Statutes. Trinity College Dublin. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  18. ^ a b "The Gospel and CITC; A brief historical survey.". Reform Ireland. 1 December 2004. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  19. ^ "About Us". Department of Religions and Theology. Trinity College Dublin. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  20. ^ Commissioners to inquire into certain matters relating to the College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth, near Dublin (1878). Report. Command papers. C.2045. Dublin: HMSO. p. 6. Retrieved 23 March 2017. 
  21. ^  Gordon, Alexander (1899). "Ussher, James". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography. 58. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
  22. ^ Curry, William, jun. The picture of Dublin: or, Stranger's guide to the Irish metropolis 1835- Page 34 "The Divinity School consists of the Regius Professor of Divinity, and Archbishop King's Lecturer, each of whom has his assistants."
  23. ^ Dublin University magazine: a literary and political journal 1841- Volume 17 - Page 634 "The whole Works of Richard Graves, D.D. late Dean of Ardagh, and Regius Professor of Divinity in the University of Dublin, now first collected, with a Memoir of his Life and Writings, by his son, Richard Hastings Graves, D.D., Rector of Brigown ..."
  24. ^ The Dublin university magazine 1834 - Volume 4 - Page 352 "C. R. ELRINGTON, Regius Professor of Divinity."
  25. ^ The Irish Archaeological Society - Irish Archaeological Society 1841- Volume 1 - Page 118 "Rev. Charles R. Elrington, D.D., M.R.I.A., Regius Professor of Divinity, Dublin."
  26. ^ Howard, Joseph Jackson & Crisp, Frederick Arthur (1898). Visitation of Ireland. Vol.II. Privately printed. p. 69. 
  27. ^ Comerford, Patrick (19 September 2013). "The Revd Professor RM Gwynn (1877-1962)". patrickcomerford.com. Retrieved 5 October 2013. 
  28. ^ "About". Trinity Centre for Biblical Studies. Trinity College Dublin. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  29. ^ "Prizes and other Awards" (PDF). Calendar 2006–07. Trinity College Dublin. Newport White Prize. Retrieved 22 March 2017. This prize was founded in 1935 by a gift from N. J. D. White, Regius Professor of Divinity 1930–35 
  30. ^ "Obituary: John Ernest Leonard Oulton" (PDF). Trinity News. Trinity College Dublin. 7 February 1957. p. 2. Retrieved 23 March 2017. 
  31. ^ a b "Academic who modernised the study of theology at Trinity". The Irish Times. 22 April 2000. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  32. ^ "J. E. L. Oulton". Harvard University Press. Harvard University. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  33. ^ Semple, Patrick (2007). The Rector who Wouldn't Pray for Rain. Mercier Press Ltd. p. 89. ISBN 9781856355605. Retrieved 22 March 2017.