Corsica: Difference between revisions

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Corsica was the birthplace of [[Napoleon Bonaparte]], whose parents were of the minor nobility. Corsica was under French control at the time, and Corsican nobles were offered the ability to gain French titles if they could prove their genealogy sufficiently. In the attempt to do that, his parents travelled to court in France, and like many other Corsican nobles, they sent young Napoleon to school there.
 
Corsica was the birthplace of [[Napoleon Bonaparte]], whose parents were of the minor nobility. Corsica was under French control at the time, and Corsican nobles were offered the ability to gain French titles if they could prove their genealogy sufficiently. In the attempt to do that, his parents travelled to court in France, and like many other Corsican nobles, they sent young Napoleon to school there.
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An other important figure is Pascal Paoli.
   
 
There is a movement on the island for Corsican independence. The French government is strongly opposed to the idea, fearing it would threaten the unity of France. Some supporters of Corsican independence have launched a campaign of bombings and assasinations to try to force the French government to grant it independence. In 2000, Prime Minister Lionel Jospin agreed to grant an increased degree of autonomy to Corsica, in exchange for a cessation of violence. This was opposed by the Gaullist opposition in the French National Assembly, on the grounds that it would lead to autonomy also for other regions (Brittany, Provence, Alsace, etc.), and that would in turn lead eventually to the breakup of France. In any case, autonomy for Corsica has created a precedent for devolution to other French regions also.
 
There is a movement on the island for Corsican independence. The French government is strongly opposed to the idea, fearing it would threaten the unity of France. Some supporters of Corsican independence have launched a campaign of bombings and assasinations to try to force the French government to grant it independence. In 2000, Prime Minister Lionel Jospin agreed to grant an increased degree of autonomy to Corsica, in exchange for a cessation of violence. This was opposed by the Gaullist opposition in the French National Assembly, on the grounds that it would lead to autonomy also for other regions (Brittany, Provence, Alsace, etc.), and that would in turn lead eventually to the breakup of France. In any case, autonomy for Corsica has created a precedent for devolution to other French regions also.

Revision as of 13:03, 14 February 2002

Corsica is an island in the Mediterranean Sea, located roughly west of Italy, south of France and north of Sardinia(Italy). Over the course of time, it has been held as a territory of both those countries. Its position has been considered significant as a platform for military operations, which were violent and ongoing between the two nations for centuries. At present, it is a region of France with 250.000 inhabitants. The regional capital is Ajaccio (about 50,000 inhabitants). The region is divided in two departements.

Plenty of extraordinary tourist areas: Bonifacio, Porto-vecchio, Calvi...

The island has a precious natural park (north east) protecting thousands of rare animal and vegetal species.

Corsica was the birthplace of Napoleon Bonaparte, whose parents were of the minor nobility. Corsica was under French control at the time, and Corsican nobles were offered the ability to gain French titles if they could prove their genealogy sufficiently. In the attempt to do that, his parents travelled to court in France, and like many other Corsican nobles, they sent young Napoleon to school there.

An other important figure is Pascal Paoli.

There is a movement on the island for Corsican independence. The French government is strongly opposed to the idea, fearing it would threaten the unity of France. Some supporters of Corsican independence have launched a campaign of bombings and assasinations to try to force the French government to grant it independence. In 2000, Prime Minister Lionel Jospin agreed to grant an increased degree of autonomy to Corsica, in exchange for a cessation of violence. This was opposed by the Gaullist opposition in the French National Assembly, on the grounds that it would lead to autonomy also for other regions (Brittany, Provence, Alsace, etc.), and that would in turn lead eventually to the breakup of France. In any case, autonomy for Corsica has created a precedent for devolution to other French regions also.

The proposed autonomy for Corsica would include greater protection for the Corsican language, the traditional language of the island. France traditionally has been discouraging of the use of regional or minority languages, viewing the supremacy of French as an assurance of the unity of the French state.