Reinforced Records

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Reinforced Records
Reinforced Records logo.jpg
Founded1989
FounderMarc Mac / Gus Lawrence
GenreBreakbeat Hardcore / Jungle/Drum and bass
Country of originUnited Kingdom
LocationLondon
Official websitewww.reinforcedrecords.co.uk

Reinforced Records is an English Breakbeat Hardcore, Jungle, and Drum and Bass record label, first founded in 1989 by 4hero and based in Dollis Hill, London. Reinforced is regarded as one of the groundbreaking record labels of the genre.[1][2]

Early History[edit]

Reinforced was started in 1989 by Mark "Marc Mac" Clair of 4hero and Gus Lawrence, soon to be joined by Dennis "Dego" McFarlane (also of 4hero) and Ian Bardouille.[3]

The first releases were all 4hero productions, including the classic Mr Kirk's Nightmare which sold more than 24,000 copies and which truly launched the label.[4] During the height of the rave scene in 1991 and 1992, like labels such as Moving Shadow and Suburban Base, it was prolific in its output, releasing tracks such as The Head Hunter and Cooking Up Yah Brain by 4hero, Feel Real Good, Oblivion (Head In The Clouds) and Rainbow People by Manix (Marc Mac), Kingdom of Dub by Tek 9 (Dego), Seance as well as Atheama by Nebula II, and A London Sumtin by Code 071.

Probably the most important connection to be made during this time, though, was that of Goldie, who had been introduced to them by his then girlfriend DJ Kemistry. He initially created some design and artwork for the label, and went on to do A&R. He also gained some studio time, which resulted in a two track 12" single (with tracks Krisp Biscuit and Killer Muffin) under the alias Rufige Cru, followed up shortly afterwards by a four track EP Darkrider. It was around this time, that Goldie also became obsessed with the use of metal acetates known as dubplates to test out new tracks before release. He created a skull label logo specifically for use on Reinforced dubplates, which would eventually become Metalheadz.[5]

The Darkrider EP was amongst a number of releases at this time to explore the darkcore sound in late 1992/early 1993, alongside Journey From The Light by 4hero, Here Comes The Drumz by Nasty Habits (Doc Scott) and Return of Nookie by Nookie. This period saw Reinforced continually push at the boundaries of the music and incorporating techniques such as time-stretching and pitch-shifting (of which the Internal Affairs EP - 4hero and Goldie - is often considered the pinnacle), and putting out a long-running series of picture disc EPs called the Enforcers which not only allowed for more experimental music to be put out alongside dancefloor-oriented tracks, but which became increasingly innovative in their design and artwork too.

2nd Wave[edit]

Into the second half of the 90's, a new emerging roster of artists such as Sonar Circle, Alpha Omega, Paradox, and G-Force and Seiji (later to become part of the Bugz in the Attic production crew) were increasingly experimenting with ever chopped up drum patterns, which would eventually develop into the Broken beat genre.[6] The aforementioned artists, and a new generation of producers such as Sonic & Silver, Genotype, Syntax, and Breakage came through to launch what was known as the 2nd wave into the 2000s.

Today[edit]

In recent years, Reinforced have largely been re-releasing back catalogue music, combined with putting out some previously unreleased material and remixes of classic tracks.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reynolds, S. (1998) Energy Flash, Picador ISBN 0-5712-8914-2
  2. ^ Ben Morris (4 March 2016). "The 10 best Reinforced Records tracks, according to Ben Morris". Dummymag.
  3. ^ Hanna Bächer (12 April 2016). "Reinforced Records". Red Bull Music Academy Daily.
  4. ^ "Reinforced - Westbury Music". Westbury Music.
  5. ^ Vivian Host (12 March 2013). "Rewind: Goldie". XLR8R.
  6. ^ Mr Beatnick (8 March 2010). "The 20 best broken beat records ever made". FACTmag.
  7. ^ "The Reinforced Unreleased Slate Series". Two Hungry Ghosts. 30 August 2017.

External links[edit]