Religion in El Salvador

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Religion in El Salvador (2013)[1]

  Catholics (54%)
  Protestants (31%)
  agnostic/atheist/none (10%)
  Other (4%)
  unknown (1%)

El Salvador's approximately 6.1 million inhabitants (July 2013) are mostly Christian.[2] Evangelicals are growing rapidly.[3]

Religious affiliation[edit]

Protestant denominations as a percent of those identifying as Protestant (38.2%, 2009)[4]
Denomination Percent
Assemblies of God 21.3
Bautista Amigos de Israel 11.5
Elim 9.0
Church of God 7.0
Baptist 7.0
Profética (Prophetic) 6.1
Pentecostal 4.5
Apóstoles y Profetas (Apostles and Prophets) 3.9
La Luz del Mundo 3.7
Jehovah's Witnesses 3.1
Adventists 2.9
Príncipe de Paz (Prince of Peace) 2.2
Mormons 2.0
Others 12.6
No denomination 2.2

There is some debate about percentages, the Institute of Public Opinion of the University of Central America in May 2013 found 51% of the population as Roman Catholics, and 33% as Protestant, 14% as not having a religion and the remainder (less than 2%) being Jehovah's Witnesses, Hare Krishnas, Muslims, Jews, Buddhists, Latter-day Saints (Mormons), and members of indigenous religions.[2] However Latinobarómetro in 2013 found 54% were Catholic, 31% Protestant, 10% atheist/agnostic/not religious, 4% other religions, and 1% did not answer.[1] It also found in 1996 that 67% of the population considered themselves Catholic and 15% Protestant.[1]

Denominations[edit]

Mision Cristiana Elim Internacional is a large pentecostal denomination started in El Salvador. It claims that its main church in San Salvador has 120,000 attending.[5] The Assemblies of God claim 285,226 members (2007).[6]

The Mormons claim 120,317 people in 164 congregations and 1 temple (2015)[7] which if correct would be just under 2% of the population. An IUDOP study in 2009 found that Mormons were 2% of the Protestants they surveyed or about .8% of the total population.[4] They started evangelizing in El Salvador in 1951.[7]

The Anglican Church in El Salvador (a diocese of the province of the Anglican Church in Central America) claims 6,000 members in 18 congregations.[8] The Baptist Association of El Salvador claims 4,427 members[9] and the Salvadorean Lutheran Synod about 15,000 in 68 congregations,[10]

Irreligion[edit]

Year % of Salvadoran Population[11] Pop of Salvadoran Population
1995 9 9
 
517,320
1996 13 13
 
754,910
1998 18 18
 
1,061,100
2000 16 16
 
953,444
2001 13 13
 
778,050
2005 17 17
 
1,032,410
2007 14 14
 
857,222
2009 19 19
 
1,174,770
2010 28 28
 
1,741,040
2011 14 14
 
875,840
2012 18 18
 
1,133,460
2015 17 17
 
1,092,930

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Las religiones en tiempos del Papa Francisco" (PDF) (in Spanish). Latinobarómetro. April 2014. pp. 6, 13. Archived from the original (pdf) on 4 April 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "International Religious Freedom Report for 2013". U.S. State Department. Retrieved 2015-04-25.  For percentages it quotes the Institute of Public Opinion of the University of Central America
  3. ^ Stephen Offutt, New Centers of Global Evangelicalism in Latin America and Africa (Cambridge University Press, 2015) focuses on El Salvador and South Africa.
  4. ^ a b "La religión para las y los salvadoreños" (PDF). Instituto Universitario de Opinión Pública Boletín de prensa (in Spanish). San Salvador, El Salvador: r: Universidad Centroamericana José Simeó. 24 (4): 2. 2009. Retrieved 28 April 2015. 
  5. ^ "Células". Elim Mision Cristiana. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  6. ^ Triplett, Don. "King's Castle 24/7 Prayer Fortress". Assemblies of God World Mission. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  7. ^ a b "El Salvador". Newsroom. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  8. ^ "Iglesia Anglicana de El Salvador". Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  9. ^ "Baptist Association of El Salvador". World Council of Churches. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  10. ^ "Salvadorean Lutheran Synod". World Council of Churches. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  11. ^ The Latin American Socio-Religious Studies Program / Programa Latinoamericano de Estudios Sociorreligiosos (PROLADES) PROLADES Religion in the Americas by country

Further reading[edit]

  • Stephen Offutt, New Centers of Global Evangelicalism in Latin America and Africa (Cambridge University Press, 2015) focuses on El Salvador and South Africa. online review