Demographics of Kosovo

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Demographics of Kosovo
Population of Kosovo (1921-2015).png
Population of Kosovo (in thousands) from 1921–2015
Population Increase 1,870,981 (2015)[1]
Growth rate Increase 0.64% (2015 est.)[1]
Birth rate Decrease 17.09 per 1,000 pop.[1]
Death rate Steady 7.0 per 1,000 pop.
Life expectancy Increase 71.3 years[1]
 • male Decrease 69.2 years
 • female Increase 73.6 years
Fertility rate Decrease 2.09 children born/woman (2015)[1]
Infant mortality rate positive decrease 36.4 per 1,000 births[1]
Net migration rate -3.72 per 1,000 pop.
Age structure
0–14 years 25.8%
15–64 years 67.2%
65 and over 7.0%
Sex ratio
Total 1.08 male(s)/female
Nationality
Nationality noun: Kosovar/Kosovan(s) adjective: Kosovar
Major ethnic Albanians (92%)
Minor ethnic Serbs (4%) and others (4%)
Language
Official Albanian and Serbian
Spoken Albanian (95%)
languages of the minorities (5%)

The demographic features of the population of Kosovo are monitored by the Kosovo Agency of Statistics. It includes various factors such as population density, ethnicity, education level, health of the populace, economic status, religious affiliations and other aspects of the population. The demographic characteristics of the population are known through censuses, normally conducted in ten-year intervals. According to the first census since the declaration of independence, the permanent population of Kosovo had reached 1,739,825, excluding North Kosovo.[2]

Albanians form the majority of Kosovo, with over 92% of the total population, with significant minorities of Serbs and others. A 2015 estimate shows Kosovo's population at 1,870,981.[1]

History[edit]

2011 Census[edit]

The final results of the 2011 census recorded Kosovo excluding North Kosovo as having 1,739,825 inhabitants.[3] ECMI "calls for caution when referring to the 2011 census", due to the boycot by Serb-majority municipalities in North Kosovo and the partial boycot by Serb and Roma in southern Kosovo.[4] The total population number was below most previous estimates. The census enjoyed considerable technical assistance from international agencies and appears to have been endorsed by Eurostat; it was, however, the first full census since 1981, and not one of an uninterrupted series. The results show that there were no people temporarily resident in hotels or refugee camps at the time of the census;[5] that out of 312,711 conventional dwellings, 99,808 (over 30%) were unoccupied;[6] and that three municipalities designed under the Ahtisaari Plan - Klokot, Novo Brdo, and Štrpce to have Serb majorities in fact had ethnic Albanian majorities (although their municipal assemblies have Serb majorities).[7]

Population[edit]

The 2000 Living Standard Measurement Survey, conducted by the Kosovo Agency of Statistics and rejected by Belgrade,[8] estimated the population between 1.8–2.0 million.[9]

Kosovo currently has the youngest population in Europe, with an estimated fertility rate of 2.4 children per woman.[10] As recently as 1990, Kosovo's population structure resembled those of countries like Haiti, and was in stark contrast to the rest of Serbia and other European countries. In recent years, however, Kosovo's population growth rate has begun to slow and its birth rate has decreased.[11][12]

Vital statistics[edit]

In 2009, 34,477 births were registered, 34,240 of whom were born alive, while 237 were born dead.[13] The vitality ratio was 9. Ratio of dead births (fetal deaths) in 1000 births was 6.9. The age group of mothers was as following: 25–29 years age group with 35.1%, 20–24 years old age groups with 26.4%, age group 30–34 years with 23.3%, and other age group compose 15.2% of the total number of births. The average age of women who have children born in 2009, is 27.7 years. Under the weight of children born in health institutions, the majority of infants with weight is 3000-3499 grams or 31.4% from 3500 to 3999 gr. 23.7%, from 2500 to 2999 gr. 12.7%, etc. Live babies born weighing less than 1000 gr. constitute only 0.3%.[14] Under education, mothers with primary school dominate the top with 44.9% of secondary but not tertiary and university with 7.2%, etc.

Frequent names in 2009 for girls were Erza (114 times) and Suela (108 times) while for boys was the names Leon (159 times) and Leart (124 times).[15][16]

Population estimates in the table below may be unreliable since the 1990s. Besides, births and deaths exclude territories with a Serbian majority.

Estimated population (x 1000) Live births Deaths Natural change Crude birth rate (per 1000) Crude death rate (per 1000) Natural change (per 1000)
1948 733 27 792 10 324 17 468 37.9 14.1 23.8
1949 751 31 643 12 937 18 706 42.1 17.2 24.9
1950 764 35 222 12 991 22 231 46.1 17.0 29.1
1951 780 29 299 14 833 14 466 37.6 19.0 18.5
1952 793 35 619 13 867 21 752 44.9 17.5 27.4
1953 813 34 595 16 726 17 869 42.6 20.6 22.0
1954 832 38 595 13 201 25 394 46.4 15.9 30.5
1955 842 36 736 15 292 21 444 43.6 18.2 25.5
1956 859 37 819 13 692 24 127 44.0 15.9 28.1
1957 873 34 159 15 300 18 859 39.1 17.5 21.6
1958 890 39 285 11 598 27 687 44.1 13.0 31.1
1959 921 37 364 12 878 24 486 40.6 14.0 26.6
1960 944 41 631 13 365 28 266 44.1 14.2 29.9
1961 972 40 561 11 759 28 802 41.7 12.1 29.6
1962 997 41 336 15 024 26 312 41.5 15.1 26.4
1963 1 021 41 525 12 423 29 102 40.7 12.2 28.5
1964 1 046 42 557 12 731 29 826 40.7 12.2 28.5
1965 1 075 43 569 11 767 31 802 40.5 10.9 29.6
1966 1 101 42 429 10 266 32 163 38.5 9.3 29.2
1967 1 131 44 001 11 308 32 693 38.9 10.0 28.9
1968 1 159 44 627 10 781 33 846 38.5 9.3 29.2
1969 1 189 46 480 10 892 35 588 39.1 9.2 29.9
1970 1 220 44 496 10 829 33 667 36.5 8.9 27.6
1971 1 254 47 060 10 312 36 748 37.5 8.2 29.3
1972 1 291 47 943 10 270 37 673 37.1 8.0 29.2
1973 1 329 47 714 10 358 37 356 35.9 7.8 28.1
1974 1 367 49 847 10 075 39 772 36.5 7.4 29.1
1975 1 406 49 310 10 018 39 292 35.1 7.1 27.9
1976 1 446 51 355 10 149 41 206 35.5 7.0 28.5
1977 1 487 49 849 9 811 40 038 33.5 6.6 26.9
1978 1 526 49 027 9 776 39 251 32.1 6.4 25.7
1979 1 566 48 125 9 575 38 550 30.7 6.1 24.6
1980 1 555 53 147 8 909 44 238 34.2 5.7 28.4
1981 1 595 48 111 9 677 38 434 30.2 6.1 24.1
1982 1 629 52 865 10 479 42 386 32.5 6.4 26.0
1983 1 664 49 645 11 040 38 605 29.8 6.6 23.2
1984 1 699 55 243 10 573 44 670 32.5 6.2 26.3
1985 1 735 53 925 11 826 42 099 31.1 6.8 24.3
1986 1 773 54 519 10 446 44 073 30.7 5.9 24.9
1987 1 811 56 221 10 307 45 914 31.0 5.7 25.4
1988 1 850 56 283 10 257 46 026 30.4 5.5 24.9
1989 1 889 53 656 10 181 43 475 28.4 5.4 23.0
1990 1 930 55 175 8 214 46 961 28.6 4.3 24.3
1991 1 967 52 263 8 526 43 737 26.6 4.3 22.2
1992 2 006 44 418 8 004 36 414 22.1 4.0 18.2
1993 2 043 44 132 7 804 36 328 21.6 3.8 17.8
1994 2 077 43 450 7 667 35 783 20.9 3.7 17.2
1995 2 113 44 776 8 671 36 105 21.2 4.1 17.1
1996 2 151 46 041 8 392 37 649 21.4 3.9 17.5
1997 2 186 42 920 8 624 34 296 19.6 3.9 15.7
1998 2 000 41 752 8 123 33 629 20.9 4.1 16.8
1999 2 000 40 020 7 569 32 451 20.0 3.8 16.2
2000 2 000 38 667 7 115 31 552 19.3 3.6 15.8
2001 2 000 37 412 6 672 30 740 18.7 3.3 15.4
2002 1 985 36 136 5 654 30 482 18.2 2.8 15.4
2003 2 016 31 994 6 417 25 577 15.9 3.2 12.7
2004 2 041 35 063 6 399 28 664 17.2 3.1 14.0
2005 2 070 37 218 7 207 30 011 18.0 3.5 14.5
2006 2 100 34 187 7 479 26 708 16.3 3.6 12.7
2007 2 126 33 112 6 681 26 431 15.6 3.1 12.4
2008 2 153 34 399 6 852 27 547 16.0 3.2 12.8
2009 34 240 7 030 27 210 15.7 3.2 12.5
2010 33 751 7 234 26 517 15.3
2011 1 801 34 262 7 556 26 706 19.0 4.2 14.8
2012 1 815 34 932 7 839 27 093 19.2 4.3 14.9
2013 1 837 29 459 7 681 21 778 16.0 4.2 11.8
2014 1 861 32 087 8 165 23 922 17.2 4.4 12.8

Marriages and divorces[edit]

In 2009, 20,209 marriages were registered. The average age of couples was 29.5 years. (men–31 and women–28). Prizren ranked first with 1,720 marriages or 8.5%, followed by Pristina with 1,643 or 8.1%, Podujeva with 1,302 or 6.4%, etc. According to the education, to male dominates the secondary education by 75.3%, and dominates the secondary education with 64.5%.[17]

Administrative divisions[edit]

Kosovo is administratively subdivided into seven districts, and 38 municipalities. With the current estimation on population, Kosovo ranks as the 150th largest country in the world based on how populous it is.[18]

Rank Name (Albanian) Name (Serbian) Population (2011)[b] Area (km2) Density (km2) Settlements
1 Prishtinë Priština 198,897 572 347.7 41
7 Podujevë Podujevo 88,499 663 133.5 76
11 Drenas Glogovac 58,531 290 201.8 37
12 Lipjan Lipljan 57,605 422 136.5 70
21 Fushë Kosovë Kosovo Polje 34,827 83 419.6 15
26 Obiliq/Kastriot Obilić 21,549 105 205.2 19
30 Gracanicë Gračanica 10,675 131 81.5 16
33 Novobërdë Novo Brdo 6,729 204 33 24
Pristina District 477,312 2,470 193.2 298
2 Prizren Prizren 177,781 626 284 74
10 Suharekë Suva Reka 59,722 306 178.5 42
14 Malishevë Mališevo 54,613 361 165.4 43
22 Dragash Dragaš 33,997 435 78.2 35
35 Mamushë Mamuša 5,507 11 500.6
Prizren District 331,670 1,397 237.4 195
3 Ferizaj Uroševac 108,690 345 315 45
23 Kaçanik Kačanik 33,454 221 151.4 31
25 Shtime Štimlje 27,324 134 203.9 23
31 Hani i Elezit Elez Han 9,389 83 113.1 11
32 Shtërpcë Štrpce 6,949 247 28.1 16
Ferizaj District 185,806 1,030 180.4 126
4 Pejë Peć 96,450 603 160 14
17 Istog Istok 39,289 454 86.5 50
19 Klinë Klina 38,496 308 125 54
Pejë District 174,235 1,365 127.6 118
5 Gjakova Đakovica 94,557 587 161.1 91
13 Rahovec Orahovac 55,053 276 199.5 32
18 Deçan Dečani 38,984 180 216.6 37
34 Junik Junik 6,078 86 70.7 10
Gjakova District 194,672 1,129 172.4 170
8 Mitrovicë Kosovska Mitrovica 71,909 350 205.5 45
9 Vushtrri Vučitrn 69,870 344 203.1 67
15 Skënderaj Srbica 50,858 378 134.5 49
24 Mitrovica Veriore Severna Kosovska Mitrovica 29,460 11 2,678.2
27 Leposaviq Leposavić 18,600 539 34.5 42
28 Zveçan Zvečan 16,650 122 136.5 35
29 Zubin Potok Zubin Potok 14,900 333 44.7 29
Mitrovica District 272,247 2,077 131.1 267
6 Gjilan Gnjilane 90,015 385 233.8 54
16 Viti Vitina 46,959 278 168.9 39
20 Kamenicë/Dardanë Kosovska Kamenica 35,600 423 84.2 58
36 Ranillug Ranilug 3,866 78 49.6 18
37 Kllokot Klokot 2,556 24 106.5 4
38 Partesh Parteš 1,787 18 99.3 3
Gjilan District 180,783 1,206 149.9 287
Kosovo Kosovo
1,816,675 10,908 170 1,339

Ethnic groups[edit]

The official results of the censuses in Kosovo after World War II are tabulated below. The proportion of Albanians was below 70% until 1961, but increased to 81.6% in 1991. The figures for Albanians in the 1991 census were estimates only, since that census was boycotted by most Albanians. Similarly, the figures for Serbs in the 2011 census omit those in North Kosovska Mitrovica, Leposavić, Zubin Potok, and Zvečan (North Kosovo), while the number of Serbs and Romani in the rest of Kosovo is also deemed unreliable, due to partial boycot.[4]

Ethnic
group
census 1948 census 1953 census 1961 census 1971 census 1981 census 1991 census 2011
Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  %
Albanians 498,244 68.5 524,559 64.9 646,605 67.1 916,168 73.7 1,226,736 77.4 1,596,072 81.6 1,616,869 92.9
Serbs 171,911 23.6 189,869 23.5 227,016 23.5 228,264 18.4 209,498 13.2 194,190 9.9 25,532 1.5
Muslims 9,679 1.3 6,241 0.8 8,026 0.8 26,357 2.1 58,562 3.7 66,189 3.4
Bosniaks 27,533 1.6
Gorani 10,265 0.6
Montenegrins 28,050 3.9 31,343 3.9 37,588 3.9 31,555 2.5 27,028 1.7 20,365 1.1
Croats 5,290 0.7 6,201 0.8 7,251 0.8 8,264 0.7 8,718 0.6 8,062 0.4
Yugoslavs 5,206 0.5 920 0.1 2,676 0.2 3,457 0.2
Romani 11,230 1.5 11,904 1.5 3,202 0.3 14.593 1.2 34,126 2.2 45,760 2.3 8,824 0,5
Ashkali 15,436 0.9
Egyptians 11,524 0.6
Turks 1,315 0.2 34,583 4.3 25,764 2.7 12,244 1.0 12,513 0.8 10,445 0.5 18,738 1.1
Macedonians 526 0.1 972 0.1 1,142 0.1 1,048 0.1 1,056 0.1
Others or unspecified 1,577 0.2 2,469 0.3 2,188 0.2 4,280 0.3 3,454 0.2 11,656 0.6 3,264 0.6
Total 727,820 808,141 963,988 1,243,693 1,584,441 1,956,196 1,739,825

Ethnic groups by municipality[edit]

The results of the census 2011 of ethnic groups in municipalities are tabulated below.[19]

Ethnic composition of Kosovo in 2005 according to the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe

The 2000 Living Standard Measurement Survey by Statistical Office of Kosovo found an ethnic composition of the population as follows:

A most comprehensive (October 2002) estimate (for the 1.9 million inhabitants) for these years:

During the Kosovo War in 1999, over 700,000 ethnic Albanians,[20] around 100,000 ethnic Serbs and more than 40,000 Bosniaks were forced out of Kosovo to neighbouring Albania, Macedonia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Serbia. After the United Nations took over administration of Kosovo following the war, the vast majority of the Albanian refugees returned.[citation needed] The largest diaspora communities of Kosovo Albanians are in Germany and Switzerland accounting for some 200,000 individuals each, or for 20% of the population resident in Kosovo.

Many non-Albanians – chiefly Serbs and Romani – fled or were expelled, mostly to the rest of Serbia at the end of the war, with further refugee outflows occurring as the result of sporadic ethnic violence. The number of registered refugees is around 250,000.[21][unreliable source?][22][23] The non-Albanian population in Kosovo is now about half of its pre-war total[citation needed]. The largest concentration of Serbs in the province is in the north, but many remain in Kosovo Serb enclaves surrounded by Albanian-populated areas.

Languages[edit]

As defined by the Constitution of Kosovo, Albanian and Serbian are official languages in Kosovo. According to the 2011 Census, almost 95% of the citizens speak Albanian as their native language, followed by South Slavic languages and Turkish. Due to North Kosovo's boycott of the census, Bosnian resulted in being the second-largest language after Albanian. However, Serbian is de facto the second most spoken language in Kosovo.

Language Native speakers[24]  %
Albanian 1,644,865 94.5
Bosnian 28,989 1.7
Serbian 27,983 1.6
Turkish 19,568 1.1
Romani 5,860 0.3
Other/Not specified 12,560 0.7

Health[edit]

Harvard medical school and NATO published a study on the impact of the conflict on Kosovo health system in 2014.[25][26] The data in the table below are from the Kosovo Agency of Statistics.

Migration[edit]

According to a 2015 report by Geoba.se, Kosovo's current net migration rate is at –3.72, ranking Kosovo 197th,[27] due to the ongoing political and economic crisis.

Religion[edit]

Serbian Orthodox Church (left) and Sunni Muslim Mosque (right) in Ferizaj.
Letnica Catholic church
Religious map of Kosovo in 2011 by settlements. The Serb-dominated gray area in the north (North Kosovo) is presumably majority Orthodox.

The results of the 2011 census gave the following religious affiliations for the population included in the census:[28] According to a 2013 and 2014 report by Freedom of Thought, Kosovo ranked first in the Balkans and ninth in the world as a "Free and equal" country for tolerance towards religion and atheism.[29][30]

Religion in Kosovo
Religion Population %
Islam 1,663,202 95.60
Christians
Catholic
Orthodox
64,275
38,438
25,837
3.69
2.20
1.48
Other 1,188 0.06
None 1,842 0.10
Not stated 10,023 0.55%

These figures do not represent individual sects operating in Kosovo such as Sufism or Bektashism which are sometimes classified generally under the category of "Islam."[31]

The Serb population is largely Serbian Orthodox. The Catholic Albanian communities are mostly concentrated in Gjakova, Prizren, Klina and a few villages near Peć and Vitina.

Kosovo War refugees[edit]

The total list of countries in which the refugees took refuge and in what numbers:[citation needed]

  • Montenegro – 61,900
  • Serbia – 180,000

abroad:

  • Albania – 405,000
  • Republic of Macedonia – 197,000
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – 17,000

other countries in which Kosovars took refuge:

  • Germany – 9,974
  • Turkey – 6,259
  • Norway – 2,476
  • France – 2,354
  • Austria – 1,455
  • Belgium – 1,205
  • United Kingdom – 330

Internally displaced persons[edit]

According to CIA, there are currently (as of 2013) 17,300 internally displaced persons, most of whom are Serbs displaced during the Kosovo War.[32]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

b.   ^ Due to the boycott of the 2011 census by most municipalities in the Serb-inhabited north (see North Kosovo), the real number of the population of Leposavić, North Mitrovica, Zubin Potok and Zvečan is unknown. Estimates are taken according to a 2014 OSCE report.[33]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Demographics of Kosovo (2015)". Geoba.se. 
  2. ^ Final Results of the 2011 Kosovo census
  3. ^ http://esk.rks-gov.net/rekos2011/repository/flipbook/2/Final%20Results_ENG/#/143
  4. ^ a b "ECMI: Minority figures in Kosovo census to be used with reservations". ECMI. 
  5. ^ . p. 125 http://esk.rks-gov.net/rekos2011/repository/flipbook/2/Final%20Results_ENG/#/144,.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ http://esk.rks-gov.net/rekos2011/repository/flipbook/2/Final%20Results_ENG/#/144, p.131
  7. ^ http://esk.rks-gov.net/rekos2011/repository/flipbook/2/Final%20Results_ENG/#/144, p.145
  8. ^ People's Daily: Belgrade to Reject Results of U.N.-Conducted Census in Kosovo
  9. ^ Living Standard Measurement Survey 2000, Statistical Office of Kosovo – see also Kosovo and its Population
  10. ^ [1]
  11. ^ [2]
  12. ^ [3]
  13. ^ Statistical Office of Kosovo Ndryshimet demografike të popullsisë së Kosovës në periudhën 1948-2006
  14. ^ "Agjensia e Statistikave te Kosoves". Retrieved 24 February 2013. 
  15. ^ "Statistikat e Popullsisë". Agjensia e statistikave te Kosoves. Retrieved 24 February 2013. 
  16. ^ [4]
  17. ^ "Kosovo Agency of Statistics". Retrieved 24 February 2013. 
  18. ^ "CIA- The World Factbook". Retrieved 24 February 2013. 
  19. ^ "People on Move,pg.20". Retrieved 24 February 2013. 
  20. ^ BBC: [5]
  21. ^ Coordination Centre of Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and Republic of Serbia for Kosovo and Metohija at the Wayback Machine (archived February 3, 2004)
  22. ^ UNHCR: 2002 Annual Statistical Report: Serbia and Montenegro, pg. 9
  23. ^ USCR: Country report: Yugoslavia
  24. ^ "Language in Kosovo". Kosovo Agency of Statistics. 
  25. ^ https://www.jallc.nato.int/newsmedia/docs/kosovo_case_study.pdf
  26. ^ "Health 2009". Retrieved 24 February 2013. 
  27. ^ "The World: Net Migrants per 1000 (2015)". GEOBA.se. 
  28. ^ http://esk.rks-gov.net/rekos2011/repository/flipbook/2/Final%20Results_ENG, p.62
  29. ^ "Freedom of Thought 2014 report (map)". Freedom of Thought. 
  30. ^ "Kosovo receives Free and Equal status for Freedom of Thought (2013)". InterFaithKosovo. 
  31. ^ http://euobserver.com/news/31390
  32. ^

    17,300 (primarily ethnic Serbs displaced during the 1998-1999 war fearing reprisals from the majority ethnic-Albanian population; a smaller number of ethnic Serbs, Roma, Ashkali, and Egyptians fled their homes in 2004 as a result of violence) (2013 est.)

  33. ^ "OSCE Leposavic estimates". OSCE. ; "OSCE Mitrovica North estimate". OSCE. ; "OSCE Zubin Potok estimate". OSCE. ; "OSCE Zvecan estimates". OSCE. 

https://ask.rks-gov.net/publikimet/doc_view/1004-vleresim-popullsia-e-kosoves-2011?tmpl=component&format=raw

External links[edit]