Religion in Latin America

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Religion in Latin America (Pew Research Center 2014)[1]

  Catholicism (69%)
  Protestantism (19%)
  Unaffiliated (8%)
  Other (4%)

Religion in Latin America is characterized by the historical predominance of Catholic Christianity,[2] increasing Protestant influence, as well as by the presence of other world religions. According to survey data from Pew Research Center 2014, 69% of the Latin American population is Catholic and 19% is Protestant,[1] rising to 22% in Brazil[3] and over 40% in much of Central America.

Christianity[edit]

The Basilica of the National Shrine of Our Lady of Aparecida in Brazil is the second largest in the world, after only of the Basilica of Saint Peter in Vatican City.[4]

The majority of Latin Americans are Christians (90%),[5] mostly Roman Catholics.[6][1] Membership in Protestant denominations is increasing, particularly in Brazil, Guatemala, El Salvador, Puerto Rico and other countries.[7] In particular, Pentecostalism has experienced massive growth.[8][9] This movement is increasingly attracting Latin America's middle classes.[10] Anglicanism also has a long and growing presence in Latin America.

According to the detailed Pew multi-country survey in 2014, 69% of the Latin American population is Catholic and 19% is Protestant, rising to 22% in Brazil and over 40% in much of Central America. More than half of these are converts.[11][12]

Indigenous creeds[edit]

Indigenous creeds and rituals are still practiced in countries with large percentages of Amerindians, such as Bolivia, Guatemala, Mexico, and Peru. Various Afro-Latin American traditions such as Santería, Candomblé, Umbanda, Macumba, and tribal-voodoo religions are also practiced, mainly in Cuba, Brazil, and Haiti.

Other world religions[edit]

Argentina hosts the largest communities of both Jews (180,000-300,000)[13][14][15] and Muslims (840,000)[16][17][18] in Latin America. Brazil is the country with more practitioners in the world of Allan Kardec's Spiritism. Practitioners of Judaism, Mormonism, Jehovah's Witnesses, Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism, Bahá'í Faith, and Shinto are also present in Latin America.[19]

Statistics[edit]

CID-Gallup 2010[edit]

Religion in Latin America (2010)[20]
Country Christianity
(%)
Catholicism
(%)
Protestantism
(%)
Other Religions
(%)
Unaffiliated, atheists, agnostics
(%)
 Argentina 85,5 74,7 10,8 3,5 11,0
 Belize 74,0 40,5 33,5 10,4 15,6
 Bolivia 94,4 76,0 18,4 2,5 3,1
 Brazil 88,7 64,6 24,1 4,3 8,0
 Chile 77,3 61,4 15,9 2,4 20,3
 Colombia 92,7 77,7 15,0 2,3 5,0
 Costa Rica 89,9 70,1 19,8 4,0 6,1
 Cuba 50,1 45,8 4,3 7,2 42,7
 Ecuador 93,1 80,8 12,3 2,2 4,7
 El Salvador 80,0 49,9 30,1 2,2 17,8
 Guatemala 86,4 47,1 39,3 1,7 11,9
 Haiti 86,5 75,0 11,5 9,6 3,9
 Honduras 88,7 49,8 38,9 3,2 8,1
 Mexico 92,9 82,9 10,0 2,5 4,6
 Nicaragua 86,1 53,2 32,9 3,3 10,6
 Panama 92,7 74,7 18,0 3,3 4,0
 Paraguay 96,2 88,2 8,0 2,3 1,5
 Peru 93,6 80,6 13,0 3,0 3,4
 Puerto Rico 94,2 60,5 31,7 1,2 6,6
 Dominican Republic 90,3 66,9 23,4 4,0 5,7
 Uruguay 50,4 40,6 9,8 4,3 45,3
 Venezuela 91,1 74,0 17,1 3,2 5,7

2014 Pew Research Center data[edit]

Religion in Latin America (2014)[1]
Country Catholic (%) Protestant (%) Irreligion (%) Other (%)
Paraguay Paraguay 89 7 1 2
Mexico Mexico 81 9 7 4
Colombia Colombia 79 13 6 2
Ecuador Ecuador 79 13 5 3
Bolivia Bolivia 77 16 4 3
Peru Peru 76 17 4 3
Venezuela Venezuela 73 17 7 4
Argentina Argentina 71 15 12 3
Panama Panama 70 19 7 4
Chile Chile 64 17 16 3
Costa Rica Costa Rica 62 25 9 4
Brazil Brazil 61 26 8 5
Dominican Republic Dominican Republic 57 23 18 2
Puerto Rico Puerto Rico 56 33 8 2
El Salvador El Salvador 50 36 12 3
Guatemala Guatemala 50 41 6 3
Nicaragua Nicaragua 50 40 7 4
Honduras Honduras 46 41 10 2
Uruguay Uruguay 42 15 37 6

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Religion in Latin America, Widespread Change in a Historically Catholic Region". Pew Research Center. Retrieved March 4, 2015.
  2. ^ Christians – Pew Research Center
  3. ^ O IBGE e a religião — Cristãos são 86,8% do Brasil; católicos caem para 64,6%; evangélicos já são 22,2% Reinaldo Azevedo in Veja
  4. ^ Facts of Basilica of Aparecida
  5. ^ Christians – Pew Research Center
  6. ^ "Las religiones en tiempos del Papa Francisco" (in Spanish). Latinobarómetro. April 2014. p. 7. Archived from the original (pdf) on 10 May 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. Alt URL
  7. ^ Religion in Latin America Widespread Change in a Historically Catholic Region
  8. ^ Allan., Anderson (2004). An introduction to Pentecostalism : global charismatic Christianity. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521825733. OCLC 53919445.
  9. ^ Pierre., Bastian, Jean (1997). La mutación religiosa de América Latina : para una sociología del cambio social en la modernidad periférica (1st ed.). México: Fondo de Cultura Económica. ISBN 9681650212. OCLC 38448929.
  10. ^ Koehrsen, Jens (2017-09-01). "When Sects Become Middle Class: Impression Management among Middle-Class Pentecostals in Argentina". Sociology of Religion. 78 (3): 318–339. doi:10.1093/socrel/srx030. ISSN 1069-4404.
  11. ^ Alec Ryrie, "The World's Local Religion" History Today (2017) online
  12. ^ "Religion in Latin America: Widespread Change in a Historically Catholic Region" Pew Research Center: Religion & Public Life Nov 13, 2014
  13. ^ LeElef, Ner. "World Jewish Population". Retrieved 2008-01-09.
  14. ^ The Jewish People Policy Planning Institute; Annual Assessment, 2007
  15. ^ United Jewish Communities; Global Jewish Populations Archived 2008-05-31 at the Wayback Machine
  16. ^ Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs - Background Note: Argentina
  17. ^ International Religious Freedom Report 2008 - Argentina
  18. ^ Árabes y musulmanes en América Latina
  19. ^ LANIC religion page
  20. ^ The Latin American Socio-Religious Studies Program / Programa Latinoamericano de Estudios Sociorreligiosos (PROLADES) PROLADES Religion in America by country

Further reading[edit]

  • Thy Will Be Done: The Conquest of the Amazon : Nelson Rockefeller and Evangelism in the Age of Oil by Gerard Colby, Publisher: Harpercollins
  • D'Antonio, William V., and Frederick B. Pike, jt. eds. Religion, Revolution, and Reform: New Forces for Change in Latin America. New York: F.A. Praeger, 1964