Republic Airport

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Republic Airport
Helicopter landing at Republic Airport Farmingdale NY.jpg
Republic Airport
Summary
Airport typePublic
OwnerNew York State Department of Transportation
ServesLong Island and New York City
LocationEast Farmingdale, New York
Elevation AMSL82 ft / 25 m
Coordinates40°43′44″N 073°24′48″W / 40.72889°N 73.41333°W / 40.72889; -73.41333Coordinates: 40°43′44″N 073°24′48″W / 40.72889°N 73.41333°W / 40.72889; -73.41333
Websitewww.republicairport.net
Maps
FAA diagram
FAA diagram
FRG is located in New York
FRG
FRG
Location of airport in New York / United States
FRG is located in the United States
FRG
FRG
FRG (the United States)
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
14/32 6,833 2,083 Asphalt
1/19 5,516 1,681 Asphalt
Statistics
Aircraft operations (2019)219,672[1]
Based aircraft (Aug. 2021)350 [2]

Republic Airport (IATA: FRG, ICAO: KFRG, FAA LID: FRG) is a regional airport in East Farmingdale, New York,[3] located one mile east of Farmingdale village limits.[2][4]

The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 categorized it as a general aviation reliever airport.[5] Federal Aviation Administration records say the airport had 3,586 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008,[6] 2,866 in 2009, and 2,783 in 2010.[7]

On behalf of NY State's Department of Transportation, the airport is currently managed by AvPORTS, a US-based and owned operator and manager of airports.

History[edit]

Republic Airport was developed by Sherman Fairchild as the Fairchild Flying Field in East Farmingdale on Long Island, NY in late 1927 as his flying field and airplane factory on Motor Avenue in South Farmingdale was inadequate to support the mass production of his Fairchild FC-2 and Fairchild 71 airplanes. Fairchild purchased property on the south side of Route 24-Conklin Street and had the airport's original layout plan prepared on November 3, 1927.

The 77.967-acre (315,520 m2) flying field was developed in the late winter and early spring of 1928 and was originally owned and operated by Fairchild Engine & Airplane Manufacturing Company. The first flights from the Fairchild Flying Field took place in late spring of 1928 after the Fairchild Airplane and Airplane Engine factories and hangar were completed and aircraft were produced in the new factories. After Fairchild moved to Hagerstown, Maryland in 1931, Grumman Aircraft Engineering built planes at the airport from 1932 until the spring of 1937.

Seversky Aircraft moved there in January 1935 from College Point in Queens, and became Republic Aviation in 1939. Republic built more than 9,000 P-47 Thunderbolts in Farmingdale during World War II and expanded Republic Field, erected three hangars and a control tower and lengthened and hardened the runways. Republic built the straight-wing F-84 Thunderjet and the swept-wing F-84 Thunderstreak during the Korean War (1952 airport diagram) and extended runway 14–32 to the southeast over the objections of Long Island State Parks Commissioner Robert Moses.

Republic Aviation produced over 800 F-105 Thunderchief fighter bombers during the Vietnam Era. Republic Aviation was acquired by the Fairchild-Hiller Corp. in 1965 for $24.5 million and Fairchild stock. Flight Safety Inc. ran the Republic Airport as a general aviation airport beginning on December 7, 1966, for the Mailman brothers'[clarification needed] Farmingdale Corporation, which had purchased the field from Fairchild Hiller for $8 million in 1965.

Republic Airport was acquired by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) on March 31, 1969. The MTA installed an instrument landing system (ILS) on runway 14–32, built the Republic Airport Terminal building, cooperated with the Federal Aviation Administration, which built the new 100' high control tower and got the US Government to transfer 94 acres (380,000 m2) to the airport in 1971 and purchased the 77-acre (310,000 m2) Lambert property on the north side of Route 109 and the Breslau Gardens property between New Highway and Route 109 in 1972.

After complaints that the MTA was not contributing taxes to local governments and questions about the MTA spending at Republic, ownership of the airport was transferred to the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) by the New York State Legislature in April 1983, to promote economic development in the surrounding Long Island region. The Republic Airport Commission was created by the New York State Legislature in 1982 (Chap. 370, L.1982) "as an advisory council to the Commissioner of Transportation in the administration and management of the Republic Airport facilities and its surrounding areas with respect to projects to be undertaken at such airport." Fairchild went out of business in 1987, and much of its historic Fairchild-Republic factory complex was sold and developed as the Airport Plaza shopping mall.

The Long Island Republic Airport Historical Society, formed in 1984, and chartered by the Board of Regents of the State of New York in 1987, maintains sixteen photographic exhibits illustrating the history of aviation, and historical archives, on the first floor of the Republic Airport terminal building behind the FAA tower on the east side of Route 110.

The most recent exhibit illustrates: "The Origins of Airplane Manufacturing in Farmingdale, NY: The Foundation Years: 1917-1928," which documents airplanes built by Lawrence Sperry, Sydney Breese and Sherman Fairchild. The airport is also home to the American Airpower Museum which offers visitors the opportunity to see World War II aircraft in flight.

The airport has seen scheduled passenger airlines: on Cosmopolitan Airlines in the 1980s,[8] Provincetown-Boston Airlines (operating as Continental Express) in the 1980s[9] and Northwest Airlink in the 1990s.[10]

Most NHL teams flying charter flights into Long Island to play the New York Islanders use Republic Airport.[citation needed]

Facilities and operations at KFRG[edit]

Republic Airport has a two-story terminal building serving passengers boarding charter flights to nearby cities such as Atlantic City, New Jersey. Three Fixed-base operators serve corporate and light general aviation customers: SheltAir, Republic Jet Center (affiliated with Signature Aviation),[11] and Atlantic Aviation. U.S. Customs and Border Protection has an office at the terminal building; however, it is staffed by appointment only and pilots must request immigration services four hours prior to arrival.[12] Next to the airport was the 56th Fighter Group restaurant, which closed in August 2012. Also, Troop L of the New York State Police, which provides highway patrol for state parkways in Nassau and Suffolk Counties, is headquartered at the airport.

Fire rescue[edit]

Republic Airport Fire Rescue Company Logo
ARFF Crash Trucks Rescue 3 and Rescue 4

Republic Airport has a full-time Index A ARFF team located at the main headquarters and terminal building. The airport has two crash trucks (Rescue 3 and 4), and a support vehicle pickup truck (Rescue 1). The airport is also served by the East Farmingdale Volunteer Fire Company and Village of Farmingdale Fire Department when mutual aid is requested.

Republic Airport ARFF truck responds to a plane crash in a local neighborhood.

Republic Airport Fire Rescue also responds to aviation incidents in the general vicinity outside of the airport.[13]

Fixed-Based Operations at KFRG (FBO)[14][edit]

Name: Fuel available Amenities Maintenance Available REF
SheltAir[15] Jet A - 100LL 100LL SS Land directly in Long Island's Route 110 Corporate Corridor and a short helicopter ride from NYC while enjoying service beyond compare: DCA Gateway, superior ground support and concierge services, deicing, complimentary interior cleaning, catering, crew cars, canteen market and complimentary refreshments, executive conference rooms, a well-appointed pilot lounge, & extensive hangar/ramp capacity. [15]
Atlantic Aviation[16] Jet A - 100LL - Pilot Lounge, Passenger Lounge, Large Screen TV, Crew Cars, Rental Cars, Wireless Internet, Flight Planning, Hotel/Limo Arrangements, Coffee/Ice/Papers, Lav Service, Quick Turns, On Site Concierge, Snooze Room, Billiard Table, Valet Service, On Site Customs (pre-arranged only), De-Ice, Large Charter Handling, Conference Room, Heated Hangars, Third Party Maintenance [16]
Republic Jet Center[11] Jet A Jet A+ Prist 100LL -
  • 100 Hour inspection
  • Annual Inspection
  • Large Aircraft (>12,500 lbs)
  • Major repair
  • Minor repair
  • Small Aircraft[17]
[18]

Flight School Operations at KFRG[edit]

Name: Aircraft Rentals Training offered FAA Class Tranning Certifications offered Ratings offered Other Advanced Rating offered REF
2BAPilot NYC Flight School
  • Multi Engine
  • Single Engine
  • Flight
  • Ground School
  • Intro Flight
Part 61
  • Instrument
  • Multi-Engine
  • Seaplane
  • Aerobatic
  • Tailwheel
[19]
Academy of Aviation
  • Light Sport
  • Multi Engine
  • Single Engine
  • Flight
  • Annual Recurrent Training
  • Biennial Flight Review
  • Computerized Testing
  • Examiner
  • Ground School
  • Instrument Proficiency Check
  • Intro Flight
  • Simulator (AATD)
Part 141

Part 61

  • Instrument
  • Multi-Engine
  • Complex
  • Glass Cockpit Transition
  • High Performance
  • Tailwheel
[20]
Airborn Flight Services, Inc.
  • Single Engine
  • Flight
  • Ground School
  • Intro Flight
  • Simulator
Part 61
  • Instrument
  • Multi-Engine
[21]
Aviation Flight Center
  • Multi Engine
  • Single Engine
  • Computerized Testing
  • Drone/UAS
  • Examiner
  • Ground School
  • Part 107 Drone Testing
  • Simulator
Part 107

Part 141

  • Commercial
  • Flight Instructor CFI
  • Flight Instructor Instrument CFII
  • Private Pilot
  • Instrument
  • Multi-Engine
  • Complex
  • Drone
  • High Performance
[22]
Flying Helicopters Made Easy
  • Helicopter
  • Ground School
  • Intro Flight
Part 61
  • Instrument
  • Rotary Wing
[23]
Global Aviation Center
  • Multi Engine
  • Single Engine
  • Annual Recurrent Training
  • Biennial Flight Review
  • Computerized Testing
  • Ground School
  • Intro Flight
  • Part 107 Drone Testing
  • Simulator
  • Time Building Programs
Part 107Part 61

Part 141

  • Instrument
  • Multi-Engine
  • Complex
  • Drone
  • Formation
  • High Performance
  • Mountain Flying
[24]
Icarus Flying Academy
  • Single Engine
  • Biennial Flight Review
  • Ground School
  • Instrument Proficiency Check
  • Intro Flight
  • Simulator
  • Time Building Programs
Part 61
  • Airline Transport Pilot ATP
  • Commercial
  • Flight Instructor CFI
  • Flight Instructor Instrument CFII
  • Flight Instructor Sport CFIS
  • Multi Engine Instructor MEI
  • Private Pilot
  • Recreational Pilot
  • Sport Pilot
  • Instrument
  • Multi-Engine
[25]
Long Island Aviators
  • Multi Engine
  • Single Engine
Part 61
  • Instrument
  • Multi-Engine
  • Rotary Wing
[26]
Michael A.N. Winkler, CFI-AIME n/a Part 61
  • Commercial
  • Flight Instructor CFI
  • Flight Instructor Instrument CFII
  • Multi Engine Instructor MEI
  • Private Pilot
  • Instrument
  • Multi-Engine
[27]
Nassau Flyers / Western Suffolk BOCES
  • Multi Engine
  • Single Engine
  • Computerized Testing
  • Ground School
  • Intro Flight
  • Simulator
Part 61
  • Airline Transport Pilot ATP
  • Commercial
  • Flight Instructor CFI
  • Flight Instructor Instrument CFII
  • Flight Instructor Sport CFIS
  • Multi Engine Instructor MEI
  • Private Pilot
  • Recreational Pilot
  • Sport Pilot
  • Instrument
  • Multi-Engine
  • Tailwheel
[28]
O'Toole Airways, LLC n/a Part 61
  • Instrument
[29]
Simtech Aviation n/a
  • Drone/UAS
  • Simulator
Part 61
  • Commercial
  • Flight Instructor CFI
  • Flight Instructor Instrument CFII
  • Private Pilot
  • Instrument
  • Cirrus
  • Complex
  • Drone
  • Emergency Maneuvers
  • G1000
  • Glass Cockpit Transition
  • High Altitude
  • High Performance
  • Turbine
[30]
Vxperts Aviation n/a n/a Part 61 n/a n/a
  • Aerobatic
  • Emergency Maneuvers
  • Formation
  • Upset Recovery
[31]

Charter airlines at KFRG[32][edit]

Name: Aircraft Total Aircraft REF
Air Rutter International Gulfstream V - Global 5000 - Embraer Legacy - Gulfstream IVSP - Falcon 2000LXCitation SovereignCessna Citation 550XLCessna Citation XHawker 800XPHawker 900XPHawker 850XPLear Jet 60 15 [33]
Northeastern Aviation Corporation Global 5000Gulfstream 650Gulfstream G450Gulfstream 400Gulfstream G300Challenger 604Embraer LegacyHawker 900XPLear Jet 55Lear Jet 60Lear Jet 24F 14 [34]
Ponderosa Air, LLC n/a n/a [35]
Sundance Aviation, LLC n/a n/a
Talon Air, Inc. Gulfstream G550Gulfstream VGulfstream G500Gulfstream G400Gulfstream GIV - SPGulfstream G350Challenger 604Hawker 4000Hawker 300Hawker 900XPHawker 850XPHawker 800XP 40 [36]
Ventura Air Services, Inc   Challenger 604Cessna Citation 550XLLear Jet 55Lear Jet 35A 8 [37]

Runway and helipad information[edit]

All runways have been repaved & resurfaced since 2022

14/32[38][edit]

Dimensions: 6833 x 150 feet / 2083 x 46 meters
Surface: Asphalt / Grooved in Good Condition
Weight Limits: 51 /F/B/X/T, S-45, D-60
Edge Lighting: High Intensity
Runway 14[39] Runway 32[40]
Coordinates: N40°44.08' / W73°25.30' N40°43.32' / W73°24.21'
Elevation: 77.8 61.3
Traffic Pattern: Left Right
Runway Heading: 132° True 312° True
Displaced Threshold: 676 Feet
Declared Distances: TORA:6833 TODA:6833 ASDA:6833 LDA:6157 TORA:6833 TODA:6833 ASDA:6833 LDA:6833
Markings: Precision Instrument in good condition. Non-Precision Instrument in good condition.
Glide Slope Indicator P4L (3.00° Glide Path Angle) P4L (3.00° Glide Path Angle)
Approach Lights: MALSF 1,400 Foot Medium-intensity Approach Lighting System with sequenced flashers.
REIL: Yes
Obstacles: 23 ft Pole 400 ft from runway, 390 ft right of center

APCH SLOPE 46:1 TO DTHR.

8 FT FENCE 0-200 FT FM RWY END, 240 FT LEFT.

26 ft Road 200 ft from runway

8 FT FENCE 180 FT FM RWY END 500 FT LEFT; 8 FT LGTD BLAST FENCE AT AER 460 FT RIGHT.

1/19[38][edit]

Dimensions: 5516 x 150 feet / 1681 x 46 meters
Surface: Asphalt / Grooved in Good Condition
Weight Limits: 76 /F/C/X/T, S-45, D-60
Edge Lighting: Medium Intensity
Runway 01[41][42] Runway 19[41][43]
Coordinates: N40°43.37' / W73°24.86' N40°44.28' / W73°24.87'
Elevation: 63.5 81.0
Traffic Pattern: Right Left
Runway Heading: 359° True 179° True
Declared Distances: TORA:5516 TODA:5516 ASDA:5516 LDA:5116 TORA:5516 TODA:5516 ASDA:5516 LDA:5516
Markings: Non-Precision Instrument in good condition. Non-Precision Instrument in good condition.
Glide Slope Indicator P4L (3.09° Glide Path Angle) P4L (3.10° Glide Path Angle) PAPI UNUSBL BYD 4 DEG LEFT OF CNTRLN.
REIL: Yes Yes
Obstacles: 29 ft Pole 775 ft from runway, 210 ft left of center 41 ft Building 250 ft from runway, 250 ft left of center

APCH SLOPE 25:1 TO DTHR.

Helipad H1[44][edit]

Dimensions: 79 x 79 ft. / 24 x 24 m
Surface: asphalt, in good condition
Operational restrictions: LCTD ON TWY "B" AT THE INTERSECTION OF TWY "F".
Latitude: 40-43.990300N
Longitude: 073-24.942828W
Elevation: 75.5 ft.
Traffic pattern: left left
Markings: NSTD, in poor condition

Helipad H2[44][edit]

Dimensions: 44 x 44 ft. / 13 x 13 m
Surface: asphalt, in good condition
Operational restrictions: LCTD ON TWY "B" NORTH OF TWY "B4".
Latitude: 40-43.483310N
Longitude: 073-24.923963W
Elevation: 66.0 ft.
Traffic pattern: left left
Markings: NSTD, in poor condition

Aircraft accidents at KFRG[edit]

1975[edit]

Lear Jet 25, N428JX, Incident occurred July 3, 1975[45]

Takeoff was aborted but the Learjet continued off the runway with both engines at or near takeoff power. The airplane collided with trees.

1993[edit]

Swearingen SA226-TC Metro II, N220KC, Incident occurred August 17, 1993 (KFRG)[46]

While approaching runway 02, the crew forgot to lower the landing gear. The circuit breaker for the gear warning horn had been pulled at some previous flights by other crew to prevent it from sounding during a high speed descent.

Propeller blades contacted the runway at a speed of 96 knots. When the crew tried to perform a go-around, the speed had dropped 10 knots. The aircraft cleared a stone wall, crashed into the water and sank into Connecticut River. Both crew members on board were pronounce deceased

2003[edit]

Lear Jet 35A, N135PT, Incident occurred August 4, 2003 (KFRG)[47]

The flight departed Republic Airport about 06:10. About 5 miles west of Groton, the flightcrew advised the Providence Approach controller that they had made visual contact with the airport, and requested to cancel their IFR clearance. The controller acknowledged the request and terminated the clearance. The airplane entered the left downwind for runway 23 at Groton, at an altitude of 1,800 feet, and continued to descend. About 2.3 miles northeast of the runway, the airplane made a left turn onto base leg. About 1.5 miles from the runway, and south of the extended runway centerline, the airplane turned left, and back toward the right. When the airplane was about 1/8-mile south of the runway threshold, an approximate 60-degree right turn was made back toward the runway. The airplane crossed the runway at an altitude of 200 feet, and began a left turn towards the center of the airport. The turn continued, and the airplane re-entered a left downwind for the runway, about 1,100 feet south of the runway, at an altitude of 300 feet. According to eyewitnesses the airplane continued the left turn, increasing the bank angle to almost 90-degrees. As the airplane was turning final approach, it began to wobble from left to right, before contacting the rooftop of a single-story residential home about 1/4-mile northeast of the approach end of runway 23. The plane continued for about 800 feet through a small line of hardwood and evergreen trees, a second residential home, a second line of trees, a third residential home, down an embankment, and through a boardwalk, before coming to rest in the Poqonock River. The airplane was owned by JetPro and operated by Air East Management, according to NTSB and FAA data.

2007[edit]

Lear Jet 25, N125FT: Incident occurred August 12, 2007 (KFRG)[48]

Sustained damage after encountering a hail storm. The airplane was withdrawn from use at Farmingdale and dismantled.

Cessna 650 Citation III N697MC: Incident occurred October 21, 2007 (KFRG)[49]

The first officer was flying the Area Navigation, GPS, approach to runway 22 at Atlantic City International Airport, NJ (ACY). During the approach, the airplane was initially fast as the first officer had increased engine power to compensate for wind conditions. Descending below the minimum descent altitude (MDA), the first officer momentarily deployed the speed brakes, but stowed them about 200 feet agl, and reduced the engine power to flight idle. The airplane became low and slow, and developed an excessive sink rate. The airplane subsequently landed hard on runway 22, which drove the right main landing gear into the right wing, resulting in substantial damage to the right wing spar.

About the time of the accident, the recorded wind was from 190 degrees at 11 knots, gusting to 24 knots; and the captain believed that the airplane had encountered windshear near the MDA, with the flaps fully extended. Review of air traffic control data revealed that no windshear advisories were contained in the automated terminal information system broadcasts. Although the local controller provided windshear advisories to prior landing aircraft, he did not provide one to the accident aircraft. Review of the airplane flight manual (AFM) revealed that deploying the speed brakes below 500 feet agl, with the flaps in any position other than the retracted position, was prohibited.

2009[edit]

Cessna Grand Caravan N336DN: Incident occurred September 15, 2009 (KFRG)[50]

A Cessna 208, N336DN, operated by North American Flight Services Inc., experienced a loss of engine power while climbing and performed a forced landing in Sheffield, MA. The airplane was destroyed by a post crash fire and the commercial-rated pilot and 5 passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Farmingdale-Republic Field, NY (FRG), destined for the Saratoga Springs-Saratoga County Airport, NY. The five passengers were employees of an industrial services company. The flight transported blasting caps and ammonium nitrate used for blasting operations, which were stored in a metal box inside the airplane.

The pilot reported that the airplane departed FRG at 1405, and he initiated a climb to 9,000 feet without any abnormalities. As the airplane was climbing, and at an altitude of about 8,500 feet, the pilot heard two "whooshing" sounds, about 5 seconds apart. The engine then began to experience torque fluctuations. Shortly thereafter, the engine torque dropped to idle, and the pilot heard a "loud bang" and felt a "burst vibration."

The pilot declared an emergency to air traffic control and was told that the closest airport was located about 10 miles north, in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. The pilot informed air traffic control that the airplane would not be able to reach Great Barrington, and he subsequently performed a forced landing to a field.

During the landing, the airplane's right wing struck a tree and separated. All occupants exited the airplane without injury; however, the airplane became fully engulfed in fire, which consumed the majority of the airplane.

This Cessna 208 was the first production Caravan.

2021[edit]

Raytheon Hawker 800XP, N412JA: Accident occurred December 20, 2020 (KFRG)[51]

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating after a  Raytheon Hawker 800XP landing gear collapsed at Republic Airport in East Farmingdale and the plane slid off the runway, federal officials said Monday.

The 2001 Raytheon Hawker 800XP operated by Talon Air carried two crew members but no passengers at the time of the Sunday night mishap, Talon Air spokeswoman Lisa Hendrickson said. According to records, the jet can seat 15, but Talon Air said this particular plane seats just eight.

Records confirmed by the Federal Aviation Administration show the flight departed Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport at 6:16 p.m. Sunday and arrived at Republic at about 8:35 p.m. According to Suffolk County police, the landing gear on the jet had "failed to deploy," but the FAA said in a statement Monday that the jet "experienced nose and main gear collapse" upon landing at Republic.

It was not immediately clear if the crew had any indication of a gear problem before landing — or if they declared an emergency before the incident.

The names of the pilots have not been released.

The plane landed at 8:35 p.m. and someone aboard radioed: "Mayday, Mayday, Mayday Talon Air 941 crash-landing runway 1-4, we're still occupying, send vehicles out," according to the Aviation Safety Network's website.

Police said First Precinct officers responded to the airport shortly before 9 p.m. for a report that a small plane landed off the runway. The two occupants were transported to Nassau University Medical Center in East Meadow for treatment of minor injuries, authorities said.

East Farmingdale Fire Department Chief Duane Welliver said the plane "crashed on landing and slid across the runway. We don’t have any details on what caused the crash."[52]

2022[edit]

Cessna 152, N64949: Incident occurred February 15, 2022 (KFRG)[53]

Aircraft landed and veered off runway into the grass damaging a runway light.[54]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Public Domain This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  1. ^ "Airport Operations". FAAOPSNET. Federal Aviation Administration. Retrieved 22 August 2021.
  2. ^ a b c FAA Airport Form 5010 for FRG PDF. Federal Aviation Administration. Effective August 21, 2021.
  3. ^ Bleyer, Bill. "List of Geographical Misnomers". Newsday. Archived from the original on May 28, 2006. Retrieved September 11, 2007.
  4. ^ "Map show airport, Farmingdale, East Farmingdale, and county border of Nassau and Suffolk". MapQuest. Retrieved June 17, 2013.
  5. ^ "2011–2015 NPIAS Report, Appendix A" (PDF, 2.03 MB). National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems. Federal Aviation Administration. October 4, 2010.
  6. ^ "Enplanements for CY 2008" (PDF, 1.0 MB). CY 2008 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data. Federal Aviation Administration. December 18, 2009.
  7. ^ "Enplanements for CY 2010" (PDF, 189 KB). CY 2010 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data. Federal Aviation Administration. October 4, 2011.
  8. ^ "Cosmopolitan Airlines". Retrieved 26 April 2016.
  9. ^ "CO020187p17". Retrieved 26 April 2016.
  10. ^ Study of Future Use: Republic Airport. State of New York, Office of the State Comptroller. February 10, 1999.
  11. ^ a b "Republic Jet Center".
  12. ^ "Pilot Information". Republic Airport. NYSDOT.
  13. ^ "Republic Airport Fire Rescue Facebook Page". Facebook. Republic Airport Fire Rescue. Retrieved 22 August 2021.
  14. ^ "Fitplan/FRG".
  15. ^ a b "Republic Airport Overview and FBOs (Farmingdale, NY) [KFRG/FRG]". FlightAware. Retrieved 2022-09-22.
  16. ^ a b "Atlantic Aviation - Farmingdale, NY (FRG)". www.atlanticaviation.com. Retrieved 2022-09-22.
  17. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  18. ^ "Republic Jet Center". Republic Jet Center. Retrieved 2022-09-22.
  19. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  20. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  21. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  22. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  23. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  24. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  25. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  26. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  27. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  28. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  29. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  30. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  31. ^ "AOPA Airports". www.aopa.org. Retrieved 2022-09-28.
  32. ^ "Aircraft Charter – Republic Airport". Retrieved 2022-09-29.
  33. ^ "Alerion Aviation". www.flyalerion.com. Retrieved 2022-09-29.
  34. ^ "Northeastern Aviation Corp". Northeastern Aviation Corp. Retrieved 2022-09-29.
  35. ^ ww6.airponderosa.com http://ww6.airponderosa.com/&meta=1. Retrieved 2022-09-29. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  36. ^ "Private Jet Charter Company | Talon Air". talonairjets.com. Retrieved 2022-09-29.
  37. ^ "Ventura Air Services Private Jet Services & Charter Flights | New York Based". venturajet.com. Retrieved 2022-09-29.
  38. ^ a b "KFRG/Republic Long Island General Airport Information". acukwik.com. Retrieved 2022-09-22.
  39. ^ "KFRG ILS OR LOC RWY 14 (IAP)". FlightAware. Retrieved 2022-09-22.
  40. ^ "KFRG RNAV (GPS) RWY 32 (IAP)". FlightAware. Retrieved 2022-09-22.
  41. ^ a b "FRG - Republic Airport | SkyVector". skyvector.com. Retrieved 2022-09-22.
  42. ^ "KFRG RNAV (GPS) RWY 01 (IAP)". FlightAware. Retrieved 2022-09-22.
  43. ^ "KFRG RNAV (GPS) RWY 19 (IAP)". FlightAware. Retrieved 2022-09-22.
  44. ^ a b "AirNav: KFRG - Republic Airport". www.airnav.com. Retrieved 2022-10-03.
  45. ^ Ranter, Harro. "ASN Aircraft accident Learjet 25 N428JX Richmond Municipal Airport, IN (RID)". aviation-safety.net. Retrieved 2022-10-06.
  46. ^ Ranter, Harro. "ASN Aircraft accident Swearingen SA226-TC Metro II N220KC Hartford-Brainard Airport, CT (HFD)". aviation-safety.net. Retrieved 2022-10-06.
  47. ^ Ranter, Harro. "ASN Aircraft accident Learjet 35A N135PT Groton, CT". aviation-safety.net. Retrieved 2022-10-06.
  48. ^ Ranter, Harro. "ASN Aircraft accident Learjet 25D N125PT Farmingdale-Republic Field, NY (FRG)". aviation-safety.net. Retrieved 2022-10-06.
  49. ^ Ranter, Harro. "ASN Aircraft accident Cessna 650 Citation III N697MC Atlantic City International Airport, NJ (ACY)". aviation-safety.net. Retrieved 2022-10-06.
  50. ^ Ranter, Harro. "ASN Aircraft accident Cessna 208 Caravan I N336DN Sheffield, MA". aviation-safety.net. Retrieved 2022-10-06.
  51. ^ Ranter, Harro. "ASN Aircraft accident Raytheon Hawker 800XP N412JA Farmingdale-Republic Airport, NY (FRG)". aviation-safety.net. Retrieved 2022-10-06.
  52. ^ "Raytheon Hawker 800XP, N412JA: Accident occurred December 20, 2020 at Republic Airport (KFRG), East Farmingdale, Suffolk County, New York". Retrieved 2022-10-06.
  53. ^ "Cessna 152, N64949: Incident occurred February 15, 2022 at Republic Airport (KFRG), Farmingdale, New York". Retrieved 2022-10-06.
  54. ^ "Aircraft Inquiry". registry.faa.gov. Retrieved 2022-10-06.

External links[edit]