Democratic Republic of the Congo–Republic of the Congo relations

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Republic of the Congo–Democratic Republic of the Congo relations
Map indicating locations of Republic of the Congo and Democratic Republic of the Congo

Congo

Democratic Republic of the Congo
Officials from both countries meet in 1970

The Republic of the Congo–Democratic Republic of the Congo relations or the Brazzaville-Kinshasa relations refers to the bilateral relations of the Republic of the Congo (Brazzaville) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Kinshasa). The two nations share the basin of the Congo River after which both nations are named. The two nations' capital cities, Brazzaville and Kinshasa, are the two closest capital cities on Earth after Rome and the Vatican City, facing each other on both sides of the Congo River. As francophone nations formerly ruled by Belgium and France, both Congos are member states of La Francophonie.

History[edit]

Relations between the two countries were cordial for most of Mobutu Sese Seko's administration but took a dive by the end of his regime.[1] Kinshasa is wary of its neighbour and claims that Brazzaville is too open to harbouring anti-Kinshasa political dissidents and rebels, while Brazzaville claims that Kinshasa lacks the political will to solve its own internal problems, accusing Kinshasa of complaining about security issues concerning their common border but doing nothing to resolve these issues.[2] Tensions between the two countries rose after Brazzaville refused to extradite General Faustin Munene and Mr. Udjani, who took refuge in Congo-Brazzaville and were linked to the 2011 Democratic Republic of the Congo coup d'état attempt against Congo-Kinshasa president, Joseph Kabila.[3]

References[edit]

See also[edit]