Republican Movement (Switzerland)

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The Republican Movement (French: Mouvement républicain; German: Republikanische Bewegung) was a political party in Switzerland between 1971 and 1989.

History[edit]

The party was formed by James Schwarzenbach as a breakaway from the National Action against the Infiltration of People and Homeland party in 1971.[1][2] It received 4.3% of the vote in the elections that year,[3] winning seven seats.[4] However, in the 1975 elections the party's share of the vote fell to 3% and it was reduced to four seats.[3][4] The 1979 elections saw the party lose the majority of its support as it was reduced to 0.6% of the vote and won only one seat.[3][5] It saw another fall in its vote share to 0.5% in the 1983 elections,[3] but retained its single seat.[5] In 1987 its vote share fell to just 0.3% and it lost its only seat.[6][5] The party was subsequently dissolved on 22 April 1989.[1][2] Most of its members joined the Federal Democratic Union.[7]

Platform[edit]

The Republican Movement supported anti-immigrant and anti-establishment policies, as well as fundamentalist Protestant Christian views.[7]

Affiliations[edit]

In 1972 the Republican Movement officially associated itself with the anti-immigrant Vigilance, which was founded in 1964 and based in the Canton of Geneva.[8] They presented themselves as an electoral alliance three years later.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1899 ISBN 9783832956097
  2. ^ a b Swiss Democrats (SD) Political Year (in German)
  3. ^ a b c d Nohlen & Stöver, p1950
  4. ^ a b Nohlen & Stöver, p1954
  5. ^ a b c Nohlen & Stöver, p1955
  6. ^ Nohlen & Stöver, p1951
  7. ^ a b Abedi, Amir (July 31, 2004). Anti-Political Establishment Parties: A Comparative Analysis. Routledge. p. 70. ISBN 9781134363681. 
  8. ^ a b Skenderovic 2009, p. 61.

Bibliography[edit]