Rescue Chocolate: Difference between revisions

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
m (Adding category Category:Charity fundraisers (using HotCat))
(added image (fair-use commercial logo) and infobox company tempalte)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{Userspace draft|source=ArticleWizard|date=May 2010}}
 
{{Userspace draft|source=ArticleWizard|date=May 2010}}
  +
  +
{{Infobox company
  +
| name = Rescue chocolate
  +
| logo = [[File:Rescue-Chocolate-logo.jpg|250px]]
  +
| caption =
  +
| type = [[Non-profit organization]]
  +
| genre =
  +
| fate =
  +
| predecessor =
  +
| successor =
  +
| foundation =
  +
| founder =
  +
| defunct =
  +
| location_city = [[Brooklyn|Brooklyn, NY]]
  +
| location_country = [[United States|USA]]
  +
| location =
  +
| locations =
  +
| area_served = Global
  +
| key_people =
  +
| industry =
  +
| products = [[Chocolate]]
  +
| services =
  +
| revenue =
  +
| operating_income =
  +
| net_income =
  +
| aum =
  +
| assets =
  +
| equity =
  +
| owner =
  +
| num_employees =
  +
| parent =
  +
| divisions =
  +
| subsid =
  +
| homepage = {{Official|http://rescuechocolate.com/}}
  +
| footnotes =
  +
| intl =
  +
}}
   
 
'''Rescue Chocolate''' is a [[Social enterprise|social enterprise business]]. Following the business model popularized by such companies as Endangered Species Chocolate and [[Newman's_Own|Newman's Own]], it donates a portion of its proceeds to non-profit organizations, specifically [[rescue_group|animal rescue]] organizations. The product line consists of various flavors of [[dark_chocolate|dark chocolate]] bars which are [[vegan|vegan]], [[parve|kosher/parve]], and packaged in [[eco-friendly|eco-friendly]] materials.
 
'''Rescue Chocolate''' is a [[Social enterprise|social enterprise business]]. Following the business model popularized by such companies as Endangered Species Chocolate and [[Newman's_Own|Newman's Own]], it donates a portion of its proceeds to non-profit organizations, specifically [[rescue_group|animal rescue]] organizations. The product line consists of various flavors of [[dark_chocolate|dark chocolate]] bars which are [[vegan|vegan]], [[parve|kosher/parve]], and packaged in [[eco-friendly|eco-friendly]] materials.

Revision as of 16:52, 1 June 2010

Rescue chocolate
Non-profit organization
HeadquartersBrooklyn, NY, USA
Area served
Global
ProductsChocolate
WebsiteOfficial website

Rescue Chocolate is a social enterprise business. Following the business model popularized by such companies as Endangered Species Chocolate and Newman's Own, it donates a portion of its proceeds to non-profit organizations, specifically animal rescue organizations. The product line consists of various flavors of dark chocolate bars which are vegan, kosher/parve, and packaged in eco-friendly materials.

History

The company, based in Brooklyn, New York, was founded by a former professional ballet dancer and Pilates instructor, Sarah Gross. It began operations in January 2010. Because of a catastrophic Haitian earthquake during the same month, the company’s first beneficiary organization was the Animal Rescue Coalition for Haiti (ARCH). Subsequent beneficiaries have included United Animal Nations, Nathan Winograd's No-Kill Advocacy Center, and the Northeast Animal Shelter.

The chocolate bars are produced at Tumbador Chocolate Factory under the direction of executive chef Jean Francois Bonnet.

Education

In addition to raising funds for non-profit organizations, the company’s mission is to educate the consumer about various issues within the animal rescue movement. Each chocolate bar’s title is linked (via package inserts) to a different issue:

“Peanut Butter Pit Bull" deals with a dog breed that has been the focus of breed-specific legislation.

“Pick Me! Pepper” spells out the benefits of pet adoption from animal shelters versus acquiring pets from breeders or pet stores. It is the company’s position that adoption from shelters serves to discourage the proliferation of puppy mills and helps to combat the problem of overpopulation in companion animals.

“Foster-iffic Peppermint” sets forth the benefits of fostering a homeless dog or cat when one cannot adopt the animal permanently. Fostering animals in private homes frees up space for other homeless animals in shelters, and it also socializes the animals thus rendering them more adoptable.

“The Fix” highlights the practice of spaying and neutering companion animals as a method of combating the problem of overpopulation in companion animals.

“Bow Wow Bonbon” touts the health benefits enjoyed by people who interact with dogs on a regular basis, and highlights the work of service dogs for people with disabilities.

“Wild At Heart” calls attention to the wild animals in zoos, circuses, animal experimentation laboratories, and canned hunt facilities.

“Mission Feral Fig” discusses trap-neuter-return (TNR) as a method of containing fertility in feral cat populations.

“Wilbur’s Fakin’ Bacon” spotlights the work of animal sanctuaries which focus on farm animals.


References

  • Daily Wag [1]
  • The Discerning Brute [2]
  • People Pets [3]
  • Best Friends, New York [4]
  • Vegansaurus [5]
  • Vegetarian [6]
  • Progressive Radio Network [7]
  • Girlie Girl Army [8]
  • Veggie Conquest [9]
  • The Jew & The Carrot [10]
  • Blisstree [11]
  • Vital Juice [12]
  • Hey Brooklyn [13]
  • Our Hen House [14]
  • Go Dairy Free [15]
  • Vegetarian Star [16]
  • All About Alice [17]
  • Seattle Times [18]

External links

  • Endangered Species Chocolate [19]
  • Newman’s Own [20]
  • No-Kill Advocacy Center [21]
  • Northeast Animal Shelter [22]
  • Rescue Chocolate [23]
  • Tumbador Chocolate [24]
  • United Animal Nations [25]