Results of the Canadian federal election, 2011

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Canadian federal election, 2011
Canada
← 2008 2 May 2011 2015 →
Turnout 61.1%

Party Leader % Seats ±
Conservative Stephen Harper 39.6% 166 +23
New Democratic Jack Layton 30.6% 103 +67
Liberal Michael Ignatieff 18.9% 34 -43
Bloc Québécois Gilles Duceppe 6.0% 4 -43
Green Elizabeth May 3.9% 1 +1
This lists parties that won seats. See the complete results below.
Élection-fédérale-canadienne-2011.png
Analysis of results by riding, together with comparisons from previous election and at dissolution.
Prime Minister before Prime Minister after
Stephen Harper Stephen Harper
Conservative
Stephen Harper
Conservative
Stephen Harper

The 41st Canadian federal election was held on May 2, 2011. It resulted in a Conservative majority government under the leadership of Prime Minister Stephen Harper.[1] It was the third consecutive election win for Harper, and with 166 of 308 seats, they will have a majority government for the first time in their eight-year history. It will also be the first right-of-centre majority government since the Progressive Conservatives won their last majority in 1988.[2] The Conservative Party won 39.62% of the popular vote, an increase of 1.96%,[1] and posted a net gain of 24 seats in the House of Commons.[3]

The election resulted in significant upheaval within the opposition parties, as the New Democratic Party (NDP) rode an "orange surge" in the polls during the campaign to 103 seats, becoming Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition for the first time in party history.[4] The total eclipsed the party's previous best of 43 seats in 1988.[5] The Liberals however were reduced to third party status nationwide. They returned only 34 MPs, less than half of what they had at dissolution.[6] It was the first time in Canadian history that the Liberals were not one of the top two parties in the house.[7] Green Party leader Elizabeth May won in her riding, becoming the first Green Party candidate elected to a governmental body in Canada, and to a national body in North America.[8]

Following their staggering defeats, including losing their own seats, Bloc Québécois leader Gilles Duceppe and Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff both announced their resignations as party leaders.[6][9]

Vote total[edit]

[citation needed]

Rendition of party representation in the 41st Canadian Parliament decided by this election.
  Conservatives (166)
  New Democrats (103)
  Liberals (34)
  Bloc Québécois (4)
  Green Party (1)
National Results (Preliminary)
Party Seats Votes % +/-
Conservative 166 5,832,560 39.62 +1.97
New Democratic 103 4,508,474 30.63 +12.44
Liberal 34 2,783,175 18.91 -7.36
Bloc Québécois 4 889,788 6.04 -3.93
Green 1 576,221 3.91 -2.86
Independent 0 63,340 0.43 -0.22
Christian Heritage 0 19,218 0.131 -0.061
Marxist–Leninist 0 10,160 0.069 +0.007
No affiliation 0 9,391 0.064 +0.024
Libertarian 0 6,017 0.041 -0.012
Progressive Canadian 0 5,838 0.040 -0.003
Rhinoceros 0 3,819 0.026 +0.011
Pirate 0 3,198 0.022 *
Communist 0 2,925 0.020 -0.006
Canadian Action 0 2,030 0.0138 -0.0112
Marijuana 0 1,864 0.0127 -0.0039
Animal Alliance 0 1,451 0.0099 +0.0060
Western Block 0 748 0.0051 +0.0037
United 0 294 0.0020 *
First Peoples National 0 228 0.00155 -0.01010
Total 308 14,720,580 100.00
Popular support based on winning and losing candidates
(based on certified results - except Nunavut and Skeena-Bulkley Valley)
Party Winners Votes Party % Total % Losers Votes Party % Total %
Conservative 166 4,380,401 74.91% 58.98% 141 1,467,337 25.09% 20.11%
New Democratic 103 2,378,632 52.49% 32.03% 205 2,153,097 47.51% 29.50%
Liberal 34 571,379 20.52% 7.69% 274 2,213,095 79.48% 30.33%
Bloc Québécois 4 64,620 7.25% 0.87% 71 826,809 92.75% 11.33%
Green 1 31,890 5.56% 0.43% 303 541,318 94.44% 7.42%
Other 0 0 0.00% 0.00% 285 95,790 100.00% 1.31%
  Totals 308 7,426,922 50.44% 100.00% 1,279 7,297,446 49.56% 100.00%

Party summaries[edit]

Conservatives[edit]

The Conservatives, who had been leading in the polls since the writs were dropped, won 166 seats - enough for the first Conservative majority government since the Progressive Conservative-Canadian Alliance merger that formed the party in 2003. Notably, the Tories made significant inroads in Toronto, taking eight seats there. While the Tories had won a few seats in the Toronto suburbs since the PC-Canadian Alliance merger, this was the first time a right-of-centre party had won seats in the former Metro Toronto itself since the PC meltdown of 1993. Combined with their traditionally heavy support in the west, this was enough to win a 14-seat majority with 39.62 percent of the national popular vote - a result also notable for being the first time the modern Conservative party successfully polled a larger share of the vote than the combined tally of the PC and CA parties in the election preceding their merger.

Despite winning a majority government, the Conservatives lost over half their seats in Quebec to the NDP, retaining only five seats in that province.

New Democrats[edit]

The NDP had a major windfall, emerging as a truly national party for the first time in its 50-year history. They won 103 seats—more than double their previous high (when they won 43 seats in 1988). Much of this was due to a breakthrough in Quebec, a province where they had been more or less nonexistent for the better part of their history. From only one seat at dissolution, the NDP took 59 of 75 seats there, dominating Montreal and sweeping Quebec City and the Outaouais. By comparison, the NDP had only won one other seat in Quebec in its entire history prior to 2011 (and had held only one other seat, via a floor-crossing). It had not even been fully organized in the province since 1990, when its Quebec wing seceded to preach sovereigntism. The 59 seats won by the NDP in Quebec is the most won by any party in that province since the Progressive Conservatives won 63 seats there in 1988. In several cases, NDP candidates in Quebec won handily even though they didn't even actively campaign.

Among the new NDP MPs were several university students. Five members of the McGill University NDP club—Charmaine Borg, Matthew Dubé, Mylène Freeman, Laurin Liu, and Jamie Nicholls—were elected from Montreal-area ridings. Liu is the youngest woman ever elected to Parliament. Also elected was Pierre-Luc Dusseault, a freshman at the Université de Sherbrooke; his victory in Sherbrooke, Quebec makes him the youngest MP in Canadian history (he only turned 20 two days before he was sworn in).

However, they were unable to make much of an impact in their former western heartland. They actually lost Elmwood—Transcona, the former seat of longtime MP and former deputy leader Bill Blaikie, by only 300 votes.

Liberals[edit]

Winning only 34 seats, the Liberals suffered the worst result in their history. They will sit as the third party in the 41st Parliament, the first since Confederation where the Liberals will not form either the Government or the Official Opposition in the House of Commons. This was the worst showing for an incumbent Official Opposition party in terms of seats, and the lowest percentage for a national Official Opposition party (the Bloc Québécois in 1997 won more seats with a smaller vote share on account of its being a regional party).

The Liberals' poor showing was largely due to a collapse of their support in Montreal and Toronto, which had been the backbones of Liberal support for almost two decades. With few exceptions, their support in Toronto flowed to the Tories, while most of their base in Montreal switched to the NDP.

In 2008, they won 20 out of the 23 ridings fully or partially within Toronto. However, in 2011, they only won six, losing 6 to the NDP and 9 to the Conservatives. Additionally, after going into the election holding 30 of the 44 seats in the Greater Toronto Area, they only won seven in 2011.

In Montreal, the Liberals lost five of their 12 seats, and came close to losing several more. Most notably, they came within 2,500 votes of losing Mount Royal, long reckoned as the safest Liberal riding in the nation.

Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff lost his seat of Etobicoke—Lakeshore to first time challenger Bernard Trottier by a margin of 5.27% of the total votes. Other famous MP's who also lost their seats are Ken Dryden (York Centre), Dan McTeague (Pickering—Scarborough East), Gerard Kennedy (Parkdale—High Park), Ujjal Dosanjh (Vancouver South) and Joe Volpe (Eglinton—Lawrence).

All told, the Liberals only won 11 seats in Ontario (all but four in Toronto) and seven in Quebec (all in Montreal)—the fewest the party has ever won in either province. They will go into the next Parliament holding only four seats west of Ontario (Winnipeg North, Wascana, Vancouver Centre and Vancouver Quadra).

Bloc Québécois[edit]

The Bloc was practically eliminated from the scene, losing 43 seats. This reduced them to a rump of four seats, only a third of the number required for official party status. In many cases, they lost seats they held since their debut performance in 1993. With few exceptions, their support bled over to the NDP. Notably, the Bloc lost all but one seat in the Montreal area. This included all of their seats in the eastern part of the city, the birthplace of the sovereigntist movement. The Bloc went into the election holding all but one seat in eastern Montreal, but lost all of them to the NDP. They also lost all or most of their seats in their longstanding strongholds in the rest of the province, such as Quebec City and central Quebec. Several Bloc MPs who had never had serious difficulty being reelected ended up losing their seats in landslides. Bloc leader Gilles Duceppe, at the time the longest-tenured party leader in Canada, lost his seat in Laurier-Sainte-Marie to NDP challenger Hélène Laverdière.

Greens[edit]

Despite losing a significant share of the national vote compared to the 2008 election, Green Party leader Elizabeth May became the first Green Party member elected to the Canadian Parliament.

Vote and seat summaries[edit]

[citation needed]

Popular vote
Conservative
39.62%
NDP
30.63%
Liberal
18.91%
Bloc Québécois
6.04%
Green
3.91%
Others
0.89%


Seat totals
Conservative
54.22%
NDP
33.12%
Liberal
11.04%
Bloc Québécois
1.30%
Green
0.32%

Gains, holds and losses[edit]

Elections to the 41st Parliament of Canada – seats won/lost by party, 2008–2011
Party 2008 Gain from (loss to) 2011
Con NDP Lib BQ Grn Ind
Conservative 143 2 (6) 27 (1) 1 166
New Democratic 37 6 (2) 17 (1) 45 1 103
Liberal 77 (27) 1 (17) 34
Bloc Québécois 49 (45) 4
Green 1 1
Independent 2 (1) (1)
Total 308 7 (30) 3 (69) 44 (1) 45 (1) 2 308

Incumbents defeated[edit]

Liberal Party leader Michael Ignatieff lost his riding of Etobicoke—Lakeshore to Bernard Trottier, a Conservative,[10] and the following day he announced he would resign as Liberal leader. Gilles Duceppe, leader of the Bloc Québécois and incumbent in Laurier—Sainte-Marie was defeated by Hélène Laverdière of the NDP and announced his intention to resign as leader of the Bloc.[11]

Four Cabinet ministers, Lawrence Cannon (Foreign Affairs), Gary Lunn (Sport), Jean-Pierre Blackburn (Veterans Affairs and Agriculture), and Josée Verner (Intergovernmental Affairs and Francophonie) lost their seats. Lunn lost to Green Party leader Elizabeth May, and the NDP won the other three seats.[12]

Defeated incumbents and winners by province
British Columbia
Defeated incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Sukh Dhaliwal Liberal Jinny Sims NDP Newton—North Delta
  Gary Lunn Conservative Elizabeth May Green Saanich—Gulf Islands
  Dona Cadman Conservative Jasbir Sandhu NDP Surrey North
  Ujjal Dosanjh Liberal Wai Young Conservative Vancouver South
Manitoba
Defeated incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Jim Maloway NDP      Lawrence Toet Conservative Elmwood—Transcona
  Anita Neville Liberal Joyce Bateman Conservative Winnipeg South Centre
New Brunswick
Defeated incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Jean-Claude D'Amours Liberal Bernard Valcourt Conservative Madawaska—Restigouche
  Brian Murphy Liberal Robert Goguen Conservative Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe
Newfoundland and Labrador
Defeated incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Todd Russell Liberal Peter Penashue Conservative Labrador
  Siobhán Coady Liberal Ryan Cleary NDP St. John's South—Mount Pearl
Nova Scotia
Defeated incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Michael Savage Liberal Robert Chisholm NDP Dartmouth—Cole Harbour
Ontario
Defeated incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Mark Holland Liberal Chris Alexander Conservative Ajax—Pickering
  Maria Minna Liberal Matthew Kellway NDP Beaches—East York
  Andrew Kania Liberal Kyle Seeback Conservative Bramalea—Gore—Malton
  Gurbax Singh Malhi Liberal Bal Gosal Conservative Brampton West
  Ruby Dhalla Liberal Parm Gill Conservative Brampton—Springdale
  Mario Silva Liberal Andrew Cash NDP Davenport
  Yasmin Ratansi Liberal Joe Daniel Conservative Don Valley East
  Rob Oliphant Liberal John Carmichael Conservative Don Valley West
  Joe Volpe Liberal Joe Oliver Conservative Eglinton—Lawrence
  Borys Wrzesnewskyj Liberal Ted Opitz Conservative Etobicoke Centre
  Michael Ignatieff Liberal Bernard Trottier Conservative Etobicoke—Lakeshore
  Glen Pearson Liberal Susan Truppe Conservative London North Centre
  Navdeep Bains Liberal Eve Adams Conservative Mississauga—Brampton South
  Paul Szabo Liberal Stella Ambler Conservative Mississauga South
  Bonnie Crombie Liberal Brad Butt Conservative Mississauga—Streetsville
  Anthony Rota Liberal Jay Aspin Conservative Nipissing—Timiskaming
  Gerard Kennedy Liberal Peggy Nash NDP Parkdale—High Park
  Dan McTeague Liberal Corneliu Chisu Conservative Pickering—Scarborough East
  Bryon Wilfert Liberal Costas Menegakis Conservative Richmond Hill
  Tony Martin NDP Bryan Hayes Conservative Sault Ste. Marie
  John Cannis Liberal Roxanne James Conservative Scarborough Centre
  Michelle Simson Liberal Dan Harris NDP Scarborough Southwest
  Helena Guergis Independent Kellie Leitch Conservative Simcoe—Grey
  Martha Hall Findlay Liberal Chungsen Leung Conservative Willowdale
  Ken Dryden Liberal Mark Adler Conservative York Centre
  Alan Tonks Liberal Mike Sullivan NDP York South—Weston
Quebec
Defeated incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Yvon Lévesque Bloc Québécois Romeo Saganash NDP Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou
  Marc Lemay Bloc Québécois Christine Moore NDP Abitibi—Témiscamingue
  Robert Carrier Bloc Québécois Rosane Doré Lefebvre NDP Alfred-Pellan
  Mario Laframboise Bloc Québécois Mylène Freeman NDP Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel
  Claude DeBellefeuille Bloc Québécois Anne Minh-Thu Quach NDP Beauharnois—Salaberry
  Sylvie Boucher Conservative Raymond Côté NDP Beauport—Limoilou
  Guy André Bloc Québécois Ruth Ellen Brosseau NDP Berthier—Maskinongé
  Alexandra Mendès Liberal Hoang Mai NDP Brossard—La Prairie
  Yves Lessard Bloc Québécois Matthew Dubé NDP Chambly—Borduas
  Daniel Petit Conservative Anne-Marie Day NDP Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles
  Carole Freeman Bloc Québécois Sylvain Chicoine NDP Châteauguay—Saint-Constant
  Robert Bouchard Bloc Québécois Dany Morin NDP Chicoutimi—Le Fjord
  France Bonsant Bloc Québécois Jean Rousseau NDP Compton—Stanstead
  Roger Pomerleau Bloc Québécois François Choquette NDP Drummond
  Richard Nadeau Bloc Québécois Françoise Boivin NDP Gatineau
  Daniel Paillé Bloc Québécois Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet NDP Hochelaga
  Pablo Rodriguez Liberal Paulina Ayala NDP Honoré-Mercier
  Marcel Proulx Liberal Nycole Turmel NDP Hull—Aylmer
  Thierry St-Cyr Bloc Québécois Tyrone Benskin NDP Jeanne-Le Ber
  Pierre Paquette Bloc Québécois Francine Raynault NDP Joliette
  Jean-Pierre Blackburn Conservative Claude Patry NDP Jonquière—Alma
  Lise Zarac Liberal Hélène LeBlanc NDP LaSalle—Émard
  Johanne Deschamps Bloc Québécois Marc-André Morin NDP Laurentides—Labelle
  Gilles Duceppe Bloc Québécois Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie
  Nicole Demers Bloc Québécois José Nunez-Melo NDP Laval
  Jean Dorion Bloc Québécois Pierre Nantel NDP Longueuil—Pierre-Boucher
  Pascal-Pierre Paillé Bloc Québécois Denis Blanchette NDP Louis-Hébert
  Josée Verner Conservative Alexandrine Latendresse NDP Louis-Saint-Laurent
  Gérard Asselin Bloc Québécois Jonathan Genest-Jourdain NDP Manicouagan
  Roger Gaudet Bloc Québécois Manon Perreault NDP Montcalm
  Bernard Généreux Conservative François Lapointe NDP Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup
  Michel Guimond Bloc Québécois Jonathan Tremblay NDP Montmorency—Charlevoix—Haute-Côte-Nord
  Marlene Jennings Liberal Isabelle Morin NDP Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine
  Bernard Patry Liberal Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe NDP Pierrefonds—Dollard
  Lawrence Cannon Conservative Mathieu Ravignat NDP Pontiac
  André Arthur Independent Élaine Michaud NDP Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier
  Christiane Gagnon Bloc Québécois Annick Papillon NDP Québec
  Nicolas Dufour Bloc Québécois Jean-François Larose NDP Repentigny
  Claude Guimond Bloc Québécois Guy Caron NDP Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques
  Luc Desnoyers Bloc Québécois Laurin Liu NDP Rivière-des-Mille-Îles
  Monique Guay Bloc Québécois Pierre Dionne Labelle NDP Rivière-du-Nord
  Bernard Bigras Bloc Québécois Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie
  Carole Lavallée Bloc Québécois Djaouida Sellah NDP Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert
  Ève-Mary Thaï Thi Lac Bloc Québécois Marie-Claude Morin NDP Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot
  Claude Bachand Bloc Québécois Tarik Brahmi NDP Saint-Jean
  Josée Beaudin Bloc Québécois Sadia Groguhé NDP Saint-Lambert
  Jean-Yves Laforest Bloc Québécois Lise St-Denis NDP Saint-Maurice—Champlain
  Robert Vincent Bloc Québécois Réjean Genest NDP Shefford
  Serge Cardin Bloc Québécois Pierre-Luc Dusseault NDP Sherbrooke
  Diane Bourgeois Bloc Québécois Charmaine Borg NDP Terrebonne—Blainville
  Paule Brunelle Bloc Québécois Robert Aubin NDP Trois-Rivières
  Meili Faille Bloc Québécois Jamie Nicholls NDP Vaudreuil-Soulanges
  Luc Malo Bloc Québécois Sana Hassainia NDP Verchères—Les Patriotes
Yukon
Defeated incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Larry Bagnell Liberal Ryan Leef Conservative Yukon

Open seats[edit]

The Bloc gained Haute-Gaspésie—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia by the largest margin of victory of their four seats won and vacated by a long-standing member of the Bloc Québécois.

The Conservatives gained Calgary Centre-North and Prince George—Peace River, both vacated by long-standing Conservatives.

Seats that changed hands through vacancies at dissolution or retirements
Alberta
Outgoing incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Vacant Michelle Rempel Conservative Calgary Centre-North
  Rick Casson Conservative Jim Hillyer Conservative Lethbridge
British Columbia
Outgoing incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Bill Siksay NDP Kennedy Stewart NDP Burnaby—Douglas
  Chuck Strahl Conservative Mark Strahl Conservative Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon
  John Cummins Conservative Kerry-Lynne Findlay Conservative Delta—Richmond East
  Keith Martin Liberal Randall Garrison NDP Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca
  Jim Abbott Conservative Dan Albas Conservative Kootenay—Columbia
  Stockwell Day Conservative David Wilks Conservative Okanagan—Coquihalla
  Vacant Bob Zimmer Conservative Prince George—Peace River
New Brunswick
Outgoing incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Greg Thompson Conservative John Williamson Conservative New Brunswick Southwest
Ontario
Outgoing incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Peter Milliken Liberal Ted Hsu Liberal Kingston and the Islands
  Albina Guarnieri Liberal Wladyslaw Lizon Conservative Mississauga East—Cooksville
  Derek Lee Liberal Rathika Sitsabaiesan NDP Scarborough—Rouge River
Prince Edward Island
Outgoing incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Shawn Murphy Liberal Sean Casey Liberal Charlottetown
Quebec
Outgoing incumbent Affiliation Winner Affiliation Electoral district
  Christian Ouellet Bloc Québécois Pierre Jacob NDP Brome—Missisquoi
  Raynald Blais Bloc Québécois Philip Toone NDP Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine
  Vacant Jean-François Fortin Bloc Québécois Haute-Gaspésie—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia
  Francine Lalonde Bloc Québécois Ève Péclet NDP La Pointe-de-l'Île
  Raymonde Folco Liberal François Pilon NDP Laval—Les Îles
  Serge Ménard Bloc Québécois Alain Giguère NDP Marc-Aurèle-Fortin

Results by province[edit]

Party name BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL YT NT NU Total
     Conservative Seats: 21 27 13 11 73 5 8 4 1 1 1 0 1 166
Vote: 45.5 66.8 56.3 53.5 44.4 16.5 43.9 36.7 41.2 28.4 33.8 32.1 49.9 39.6
     New Democrats Seats: 12 1 0 2 22 59 1 3 0 2 0 1 0 103
Vote: 32.5 16.8 32.3 25.8 25.6 42.9 29.8 30.3 15.4 32.6 14.4 45.8 19.4 30.6
     Liberal Seats: 2 0 1 1 11 7 1 4 3 4 0 0 0 34
Vote: 13.4 9.3 8.6 16.6 25.3 14.2 22.6 28.9 41.0 37.9 33.0 18.4 28.7 18.9
     Bloc Québécois Seats: 4 4
Vote: 23.4 6.0
     Green Seats: 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Vote: 7.7 5.3 2.7 3.6 3.8 2.1 3.2 4.0 2.4 0.9 18.9 3.1 2.0 3.9
     Independent and no affiliation Vote: 0.2 1.3 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.4
Total seats 36 28 14 14 106 75 10 11 4 7 1 1 1 308

British Columbia[edit]

Results in British Columbia
Party Seats Second Third Fourth Fifth Sixth Votes % +/-
  Conservative 21 13 2 -1
  New Democrats 12 19 5 +3
  Liberal 2 4 23 7 -3
Green 1 6 29 +1
Christian Heritage 3 3
  Independent and
no Affiliation
9 2
Libertarian 6 2
Marxist–Leninist 5 3
Communist 3
Canadian Action 2
Progressive Canadian 1 1
  Western Block 1
Pirate 3
Rhinoceros
Total 36 100.0

Prairie provinces[edit]

Alberta[edit]

Results in Alberta
Party Seats Second Third Fourth Fifth Sixth Votes % +/-
  Conservative 27 1 932,765 66.8 +2.2
  New Democrats 1 23 4 234,730 16.8 +4.1
  Liberal 0 3 15 10 129,310 9.3 -2.1
Green 0 0 9 18 1 73,058 5.2 -3.6
  Independent 0 1 5 17,906 1.3 -0.7
Christian Heritage 0 0 5 2 3,401 0.2 -0.1
Canadian Action 0 0 1 384 0.0 -0.1
Marxist–Leninist 0 0 3 2 808 0.1 0
Communist 0 0 1 1 346 0.0 0
Pirate 0 0 2 663 0.0 0
  Western Block 0 0 2 415 0.0 0
Rhinoceros 0 0 1 345 0.0 0
Progressive Canadian 0 0 1 1,754 0.1 +0.1
Total 28 1,395,885 100.0

Saskatchewan[edit]

Results in Saskatchewan
Party Seats Second Third Fourth Fifth Votes % +/-
  Conservative 13 1 0 0 0 -
  Liberal 1 0 13 0 0 -
  New Democrats 0 13 1 0 0
Green 0 0 0 14 0
Canadian Action 0 0 0 0 1
  Independent 0 0 0 0 2
Total 14 100.0

Manitoba[edit]

Results in Manitoba
Party Seats Second Third Fourth Fifth Sixth Votes % +/-
  Conservative 11 2 1 0 0 0 +2
  New Democrats 2 9 3 0 0 0 -2
  Liberal 1 3 9 1 0 0 -
Green 0 0 1 13 0 0
Christian Heritage 0 0 0 0 2 0
  Independent 0 0 0 0 2 2
Communist 0 0 0 0 2 0
Pirate 0 0 0 0 0 1
Total 14 100.0

Ontario[edit]

Results in Ontario
Party Seats Second Third Fourth Fifth Sixth Votes % +/-
  Conservative 73 24 9 0 0 0 +22
  New Democrats 22 34 50 0 0 0 +5
  Liberal 11 46 46 3 0 0 -27
Green 0 1 0 100 2 0
  Independent and
no Affiliation
0 1 1
Christian Heritage 0 0 0 0 21 2
Progressive Canadian 0 0 0 0 6 2
Marxist–Leninist 0 0 0 0 17 6
Libertarian 0 0 0 1 11 2
Communist 0 0 0 0 3 3
Marijuana 1
Canadian Action
First Peoples National 0 0 0 0 1 0
Animal Alliance 0 0 0 0 3 2
Pirate 0 0 0 0 1 1
United 0 0 0 0 2 1
Total 106 100.0

Quebec[edit]

Results in Quebec
Party Seats Second Third Fourth Fifth Sixth Votes % +/-
  New Democrats 59 14 2 0 0 0 +58
  Liberal 7 10 23 35 0 0 -7
  Conservative 5 8 32 28 1 0 -5
  Bloc Québécois 4 42 17 11 1 0 -45
Green 0 0 0 1 73 1
  Independent and
no affiliation
0 1 1 0 0 4
Marxist–Leninist 0 0 0 0 0 14
Rhinoceros 0 0 0 0 0 10
Christian Heritage 0 0 0 0 0 5
Communist 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pirate 0 0 0 0 0 1 369
Canadian Action 0 0 0 0 0 1 250
Total 75 100.0

Atlantic provinces[edit]

New Brunswick[edit]

Results in New Brunswick
Party Seats Second Third Fourth Fifth Votes % +/-
  Conservative 8 2 0 0 0 +2
  Liberal 1 2 7 0 0 -2
  New Democrats 1 6 3 0 0 -
Green 0 0 0 8 1
Marxist–Leninist
Christian Heritage 0 0 0 0 1
Total 10 100.0

Nova Scotia[edit]

Results in Nova Scotia
Party Seats Second Third Fourth Fifth Votes % +/-
  Conservative 4 5 2 0 0 +1
  Liberal 4 3 4 0 0 -1
  New Democrats 3 3 5 0 0 +1
Green 0 0 0 11 0
Christian Heritage 0 0 0 0 1
Marxist–Leninist 0 0 0 0 1
Total 11 100.0

Prince Edward Island[edit]

Results in Prince Edward Island
Party Seats Second Third Fourth Votes % +/-
  Liberal 3 1 0 0 -
  Conservative 1 3 0 0 -
  New Democrats 0 0 4 0 -
Green 0 0 0 4
Christian Heritage 0 0 0 0
Total 4 100.0

Newfoundland and Labrador[edit]

Results in Newfoundland and Labrador (Preliminary)
Party Seats Second Third Fourth Votes % +/-
  Liberal 4 2 1 0 -2
  New Democrats 2 0 5 0 +1
  Conservative 1 5 1 0 +1
Green 0 0 0 5
  Independent 0 0 0 2
Total 7 100.0

Results by territory[edit]

Results in the Yukon
Party Seats Second Third Votes % +/-
  Conservative 1 5,422 33.8 +1.1
  Liberal 1 5,290 32.9 -12.9
Green 1 3,037 18.9 +6.1
  New Democrats 2,308 14.4 +5.7
Total 1 16,057 100.0
Results in the Northwest Territories
Party Seats Second Third Fourth Votes % +/-
  New Democrats 1 7,140 45.8 +4.3
  Conservative 1 5,001 32.1 -5.5
  Liberal 1 2,872 18.4 +4.8
Green 1 477 3.1 -2.4
Animal Alliance 87 0.6 +0.6
Total 1 15,577 100.0
Results in Nunavut
Party Seats Second Third Votes % +/-
  Conservative 1 3,930 49.9 +15.0
  Liberal 1 2,260 28.7 -0.4
  New Democrats 1 1,525 19.4 -8.2
Green 160 2.0 -6.3
Total 1 7,875 100.0

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "PM returns to Ottawa after majority win". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. May 3, 2011. Retrieved May 3, 2011. 
  2. ^ Maher, Stephen (May 3, 2011). "Harper delivers Conservatives' first majority since 1988". Halifax Chronicle-Herald. Archived from the original on May 6, 2011. Retrieved May 3, 2011. 
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