Retina-X Studios

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Retina-X Studios, LLC.
Limited liability company
IndustrySoftware
Founded1997; 21 years ago (1997)
HeadquartersJacksonville, Florida, United States[1]
ProductsMonitoring software for computer and mobile devices
Websiteretinax.com

Retina-X Studios is a software manufacturer company that develops computer and cell phone monitoring applications,[2] focused on computers, smartphones, tablets and networks.[3] The company is founded in 1997 and it is based in Jacksonville, Florida, United States.[1]

History[edit]

The company was founded in July 1997 primarily as a web consulting and design company. In 2003, after a period of developing monitoring products for outside companies, the company began creating monitoring software products using its own brand name. The first software product, named AceSpy, was released on April 28, 2003.[4]

In May 2007, the company developed and released the first monitoring software for mobile phones, named Mobile-Spy, particularly for Windows Mobile.

Products[edit]

  • Mobile-Spy – monitoring software for mobile internet and cell phone activity.[5]
  • PhoneSheriff – parental monitoring software that allows multiple time restrictions and filtering.
  • SniperSpy and SniperSpy Mac – monitoring software for Windows & Mac.
  • AceSpy and AceSpy Mac – similar to SniperSpy, but doesn't have a live control panel.
  • PeekTab – tablet monitoring software for iPad and Android tablets.
  • Net Orbit - computer monitoring software for network.

Usage[edit]

Target audiences for Retina-X Studios are parents and employers.[citation needed]

Legal[edit]

Parents and employers use legal monitoring software to check their teens' and staff's internet use.[6][7][8] This is legal since juveniles are the responsibility of their parents. Company markets its products as spy applications as parents can review child's messages and call details without the child's knowledge.[9] In some cases ethical issues can arise if employees are not made aware of monitoring tools, if personal emails are intentionally accessed and if managers are involved directly in evaluating the contents of logging activities as they can be/become biased towards the person whose email is being reviewed.[10]

Illegal[edit]

Using cell phones for spying has also increased due to multiplication of smart phones and compromising one's information is very possible with spy apps. People can stalk each other easily with company software.[11][12] All they need is a onetime access to the gadget and then such software would run invisibly.[citation needed] The wrong use of the software should not be overlooked.[13] The hackers can access the online information that is parsed to the customer's account and this can lead to privacy issues.[14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Retina-X Studios LLC". local.com.
  2. ^ "Retina-X Studios". Retrieved 25 September 2013.
  3. ^ Taylor, Jordyn (6 August 2014). "Study: Most Sexting Occurs On Tuesdays Between 10 a.m. and Noon". BetaBeat. Retrieved 11 September 2014.
  4. ^ Coleman, Matt (11 February 2011). "Software developer offers cross-platform cell phone program". Jacksonville Business Journal. Retrieved 30 July 2014.
  5. ^ Timson, Lia (29 April 2010). "Spy software watches BlackBerry, privacy advocates too". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 28 July 2014.
  6. ^ Marshall, Patrick. "Spyware goes mobile". Government Computer News. Retrieved May 4, 2007.
  7. ^ Dahlquist, David. "lets you keep a close eye on remote Macs". Macworld. Retrieved Aug 11, 2010.
  8. ^ "Now you can spy on iPhone users too". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved December 15, 2008.
  9. ^ Slattery, Brennon. "iPhone is Now the SpyPhone". PCWorld. Retrieved Dec 18, 2008.
  10. ^ Barnett, Cynthia. "0 Share Email Print NORTHEAST Technology - Peeping Tech". Florida Trend. Retrieved 1 February 2011.
  11. ^ Farrar, Lara. "Calling all spies: Has cell phone spy tech got your number?". CNN.
  12. ^ Scheck, Justin (August 3, 2010). "Stalkers Exploit Cellphone GPS". Wall Street Journal.
  13. ^ "Report says U.S. needs new approach for security". Department of Information Technology. Archived from the original on 2013-12-22.
  14. ^ Liebowitz, Matt. "'Mobile Spy' App May Be Open To Hijacking Attacks". Tech News Daily. Retrieved 16 May 2012.

External links[edit]