Return to the Hiding Place

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Return to the Hiding Place
War of Resistance.jpg
Directed by
Produced by Petra Spencer Pearce
Screenplay by
  • Peter C. Spencer
Based on Return to the Hiding Place (Book)
Starring
Cinematography Philip Roy
Edited by Josiah Spencer
Production
company
10 West Studios
Distributed by
Release date
  • August 22, 2011 (2011-08-22) (United Kingdom)
  • 2013 (2013) (United States)
Running time
123 min
Country United States
Language English
Box office $45,405

Return to the Hiding Place (2013) is a film based upon the factual accounting of Hans Poley's World War II encounter with Corrie ten Boom, his involvement in the Dutch resistance and the wartime harboring of Jewish refugees. A non-Jewish fugitive himself, for refusing to pledge his allegiance to the Nazi party; Poley was the first person hidden from the Nazis in Ten Boom House, which today is a museum in Haarlem, Netherlands.[1] The film is adapted, in part, from Poley's book, Return to the Hiding Place (1993),[2] personal recollections, relayed to screenwriter Dr. Peter C. Spencer, and research from the Dutch National Archives. The film is neither a prequel, nor a sequel to the 1975 film, The Hiding Place; rather, Return to the Hiding Place is a congruent accounting of Dutch underground resistance efforts from Hans Poley's perspective.[3] It was directed by Peter C. Spencer and starred John Rhys-Davies, Mimi Sagadin and Craig Robert Young.

An earlier film also based on the book of the same title was tested in Europe in 2011 titled War of Resistance but due to distinct differences in content and storyline was determined by official United States copyright to be a separate motion picture in entirety. The european title is not credited with any accolades, box office receipts, or further connection to the film released in the United States.[4]

Background[edit]

On May 15, 1940, German occupation of the Netherlands began with the nation's surrender, food and materials were rationed and evening curfews were imposed, gradually tightening from 10:00 pm to 6:00 pm. Persecution of the Jewish population also had a gradual implementation, beginning with the requirement of wearing a yellow star bearing the name Jew, to attacks against Jewish businesses and places of worship, culminating in the mass transport of Jewish citizens to unknown locations. Conspiracy theories were beginning to emerge concerning the fate of those who were being transported to the concentration camps.[5] Corrie ten Boom (15 April 1892 – 15 April 1983) and her family were actively involved in the Dutch underground, inviting the persecuted to live in their home and creating a hidden room to conceal them during searches. Hans Poley, a young Christian was the first guest and benefactor of the ten Boom family's extraordinary hospitality in May 1943.[6]

Poley's persecution began when he refused to sign the Nazi Manifesto which reads in part:

23. We demand legal opposition to known lies and their promulgation through the press. In order to enable the provision of a German press, we demand, that:
a. All writers and employees of the newspapers appearing in the German language be members of the race;
b. Non-German newspapers be required to have the express permission of the State to be published. They may not be printed in the German language;
c. Non-Germans are forbidden by law any financial interest in German publications, or any influence on them, and as punishment for violations the closing of such a publication as well as the immediate expulsion from the Reich of the non-German concerned. Publications which are counter to the general good are to be forbidden. We demand legal prosecution of artistic and literary forms which exert a destructive influence on our national life, and the closure of organizations opposing the above made demands.
24. We demand freedom of religion for all religious denominations within the state so long as they do not endanger its existence or oppose the moral senses of the Germanic race. The Party as such advocates the standpoint of a positive Christianity without binding itself confessionally to any one denomination. It combats the Jewish-materialistic spirit within and around us, and is convinced that a lasting recovery of our nation can only succeed from within on the framework: The good of the state before the good of the individual.[7]
25. For the execution of all of this we demand the formation of a strong central power in the Reich. Unlimited authority of the central parliament over the whole Reich and its organizations in general. The forming of state and profession chambers for the execution of the laws made by the Reich within the various states of the confederation. The leaders of the Party promise, if necessary by sacrificing their own lives, to support by the execution of the points set forth above without consideration.[8]

Cast[edit]

Cast overview, first billed only:

Filming locations[edit]

Awards[edit]

Return to the Hiding Place

Year Nominee/work Award Result
2013 San Antonio Independent Christian Film Festival Audience Choice Award[9] Won
2013 San Antonio Independent Christian Film Festival Best Feature Film [9][10] Won
2013 Accolade Competition Award of Excellence Feature Film [11] Won
2013 Central Florida Film Festival Festival Prize Best Feature Film [12] Won
2013 Bel Air Film Festival Best Jury Feature: Film [13] Won
2013 Bel Air Film Festival Best Jury Feature: Cinematography [13] Won
2013 Bel Air Film Festival Best Jury Feature: Directing [13] Won

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Corrie ten Boom House". The Corrie ten Boom House Museum. Archived from the original on 28 April 2010. Retrieved 20 November 2013. The Corrie ten Boom House is located at 19 Barteljorisstraat, Haarlem. 
  2. ^ Poley, Hans (1991). Return to the Hiding Place. Haarlem,: Chariot Family Pub. p. 205. ISBN 0781409322. 
  3. ^ John Rhys Davies on the War of Resistance
  4. ^ Certificate of copyright, United States Copyright Office, Registration Number PAu003693052, Title of Work: Return to the Hiding Place, Year of Completion: 2013, Author Created: Entire Motion Picture. Material excluded from claim in previous work under registration number: PAu3595411 2011. In addition, the title War of Resistance is not mentioned in either work's registration and is therefore not a title to be equated with the United States domestic picture Return to the Hiding Place on any legal terms.
  5. ^ Rosewell Moore, Pamela (2004). "A Surprise Invitation". Life Lessons from The Hiding Place: Discovering the Heart of Corrie ten Boom. Baker Books, 2004. ISBN 9781441262868. Retrieved 21 November 2013. About the author (2004) Pam Rosewell Moore, a native of England, was Corrie ten Boom's personal companion for the last seven years of Corrie's life. She worked as director of intercessory prayer and director of spiritual life at Dallas Baptist University for nearly 15 years. 
  6. ^ Rosewell Moore, Pamela (2004). "The Underground". Life Lessons from The Hiding Place: Discovering the Heart of Corrie ten Boom. Baker Books, 2004. ISBN 9781441262868. Retrieved 21 November 2013. 
  7. ^ Konrad Heiden, A History of National Socialism, 1935. Translated by Alfred A. Knopf, page 17.
  8. ^ Heiden, Konrad (1932). A History of National Socialism (RLE Responding to Fascism). Germany: Taylor & Francis US, 2010. pp. 16–17. ISBN 9780203850237. 
  9. ^ a b "Audience Choice Award: 'Return to the Hiding Place'". San Antonio Independent Christian Film Festivall. 10 February 2014. Retrieved 21 November 2013. 
  10. ^ "Best Feature Film: 'Return to the Hiding Place'". San Antonio Independent Christian Film Festivall. 10 February 2014. Retrieved 21 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Award of Excellence". Return to the Hiding Place. Accolade. Archived from the original on 1 May 2014. Retrieved 21 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "BEST FEATURE FILM FINALISTS". Return to the Hiding Place. Central Florida Film Festival. Retrieved 21 November 2013. AND THE WINNER IS... RETURN TO THE HIDING PLACE Produced by Petra Pearce Directed by Peter Spencer 
  13. ^ a b c "Announcing 2013 Bel-Air Film Festival Winners:". Return to the Hiding Place. Bel Air Film Festival ·. Retrieved 18 November 2013. 

External links[edit]