Return to the Lost World

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Return to the Lost World
Return to the Lost World.jpg
DVD cover
Directed byTimothy Bond
Produced byFrank Agrama
Norman Siderow
Daniele Lorenzano
Written byHarry Alan Towers
StarringJohn Rhys-Davies
Eric McCormack
David Warner
Nathania Stanford
Darren Peter Mercer
Tamara Gorski
Music byIsaiah Sanders
Gerard Shadrick
Lawrence Shragge
Larry Wolff
CinematographyPaul Beeson
Edited byStephen Lawrence
Distributed byHarmony Gold
Silvio Berlusconi Communications
Release date
March 9, 1992
Running time
99 minutes
CountryCanada
LanguageEnglish

Return to the Lost World is a 1992 film directed by Timothy Bond and starring John Rhys-Davies, Eric McCormack, David Warner, Nathania Stanford, Darren Peter Mercer, and Tamara Gorski. It is a sequel to the film The Lost World, which was released the same year.

Plot[edit]

Belgian scientist Bertram Hammonds, along with Gomez, who survived being injured in the first film, arrives in the Lost World to drill for crude oil. He and his men begin capturing the natives for slave labor, throwing Chief Palala off the top of the plateau. He survives and is rescued by Malu and taken to a nearby village. Word reaches Edward Malone and Jenny Nielson in England, who remind Professors Challenger and Summerlee of the promise they made to Palala: that they would return to the Lost World should they be needed.

However the professors are having a feud. Challenger recently discredited Summerlee on a theory and now they aren't on speaking terms. With help from Jim, Malone and Jenny manage to bamboozle Challenger and Summerlee into coming along with each mistakenly believing they are commanding the expedition while the other is remaining in England. When they encounter one another aboard the steamship bound for Africa, they nearly come to blows. Upon arriving they are led to the base of the plateau by Malu, where she found Chief Palala.

Above, attacks by dinosaurs have set back Hammonds' work. His drilling crews accidentally tap into a volcanic pipe during a tyrannosaurus' visit, triggering a volcanic eruption that threatens to destroy the whole plateau. The initial eruption destroys the plane they arrived in. Fleeing, Hammonds and Gomez take hostage Chief Palala's daughter and threaten to kill her unless the natives show them how to leave. Suddenly Challenger and the others arrive, having come the same way they left last time, through the caves.

Challenger shoots and kills Gomez, and Hammonds is taken prisoner. After several adventures including clashes with the hostile drilling crew members, the group struggles to stop the erupting volcano. Challenger creates a new explosive, "Challengerite," with which to seal the volcano. Boxes of the explosive are put into a cave nearby but Hammonds chases Jim inside, not wanting them to set off the explosives. He tries to ply Jim with promises of wealth but Jim sets off the explosives, stopping the eruption and seemingly killing Hammonds in the process.

Afterward, Summerlee congratulates Challenger on the Challengerite, and they muse on how much longer they can keep the Lost World safe from human intervention.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Filming

Filming for Return to the Lost World took place simultaneously with its predecessor The Lost World. The movie was filmed during 1991 in Zimbabwe.[1][better source needed][2]

Reception[edit]

Critical Reception

The film Return to the Lost World was given poor to mixed reviews upon release. On the review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds an approval rating of 17% based on 122 reviews with The film holding an average rating of 2.6/5 on the site. On the Internet Database IMDb, the movie is given a rating of 5.0/10 based on 402 reviews. Many users noted that they felt the film was not as entertaining as its predecessor.[3]

Box Office

The film did not appear in theatres as it was a direct to home video film and therefore there was no box office revenue. The movie was released on March 9, 1992 in Canada.

Relation to Novel[edit]

The films predecessor The Lost World was based on the book of the same name by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the book's plot closely follows that of Totem and Taboo by Sigmund Freud.[4] The sequel Return to the Lost World is not as closely related to Freud's work and is a continuation from the Lost World and contains its own story elements and plot that was not in the original novel.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Films Shot in Zimbabwe". Wikipedia. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  2. ^ "Return to the Lost World". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  3. ^ "Return to the Lost World". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  4. ^ Sharoni, Josephine (2017). Chapter 4: Science and the Thing: Arthur Conan Doyle's the Lost World. Contemporary Psychoanalytic Studies. pp. 50–102. |access-date= requires |url= (help)

External links[edit]