Revolutionary Site

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Revolutionary Site
Chosŏn'gŭl
Hancha
Revised RomanizationHyeongmyeong-sajeokji
McCune–ReischauerHyŏngmyŏng-sajŏkchi
Revolutionary Battle Site
Chosŏn'gŭl
Hancha
Revised RomanizationHyeongmyeong-jeonjeokji
McCune–ReischauerHyŏngmyŏng-jŏnjŏkchi

Revolutionary Sites (Chosŏn'gŭl혁명사적지; MRHyŏngmyŏng-sajŏkchi) are designated historical sites in North Korea.[1] The sites were designated by Kim Jong-il when he began working at the Propaganda and Agitation Department of the Workers' Party of Korea in 1966.[2][3] He would send troops all over the country to unearth sites that "were supposedly once forgotten and undiscovered".[4] Kim's goal in designating the sites was to solidify the North Korean cult of personality centered around him and his father Kim Il-sung.[2]

In 1988, there were 27 such sites.[5] Today, there are more than 60. Of them, 40 commemorate Kim Il-sung, 20 Kim Jong-il, and many others Kim Hyong-jik, Kim Jong-suk, Kim Hyong-gwon and other members of the Kim family.[6]

There are two categories of sites, Revolutionary Sites and Revolutionary Battle Sites. Rather than a single building or a point of interest, the sites spawn large areas.[7] Some famous Revolutionary Sites include Mangyongdae, the birth place of Kim Il-sung, in Pyongyang,[8] and Jangjasan Revolutionary Site and Oun Revolutionary Site associated with the youth of Kim Jong-il.[7] The Mount Paektu area in particular hosts many sites.[9]

South Koreans have criticized the sites for "wip[ing] out traditional culture".[10]

List[edit]

Revolutionary Sites[edit]

Revolutionary Battle Sites[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kim 2003, p. 113.
  2. ^ a b Lim Jae-Cheon (2008). Kim Jong-il's Leadership of North Korea. New York: Routledge. p. 43. ISBN 978-1-134-01712-6.
  3. ^ Armstrong, Charles K. (2013). Tyranny of the Weak: North Korea and the World, 1950–1992. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. p. 321. ISBN 978-0-8014-6893-3.
  4. ^ Korea & World Affairs. 32. Seoul: Research Center for Peace and Unification. 2008. p. 308. OCLC 607604144.
  5. ^ Lee Ik-sang (1988). A Peek into North Korea. Seoul: Naewoe Press. p. 30. OCLC 604909014.
  6. ^ "Forced To Hate". People for Successful Corean Reunification. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  7. ^ a b c d Lim Jae-Cheon (2015). Leader Symbols and Personality Cult in North Korea: The Leader State. New York: Routledge. p. 35. ISBN 978-1-317-56741-7.
  8. ^ a b Hoare, James; Pares, Susan (2005). North Korea in the Twenty-first Century. Global Oriental. p. 180. ISBN 978-1-901903-96-6.
  9. ^ "Two British scientists visit North Korea's mysterious Mt. Paektu volcano". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. September 5, 2014. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  10. ^ A Comparative Study of South and North Korea. Seoul: National Unification Board. 1982. p. 129. OCLC 471661066.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw "Search KCNA Archive with STALIN". nk-news.net. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  12. ^ Corfield 2014a, p. 26.
  13. ^ Corfield 2014b, p. 27.
  14. ^ a b "Revolutionary Sites Associated with Immortal Exploits of Kim Jong Suk". KCNA. 22 December 2003. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  15. ^ "Chosan Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 1 December 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  16. ^ "Hoeryong Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 14 December 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  17. ^ "Junggang Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 9 July 2007. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  18. ^ "Statues of Kim Il Sung Erected in Different Places". KCNA. 8 July 2007. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  19. ^ Corfield 2014c, p. 72.
  20. ^ "Events Held in DPRK to Celebrate War Victory Day". KCNA. 25 July 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  21. ^ "Phophyong Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 9 July 2007. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  22. ^ "Phyongchon Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 1 December 1999. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  23. ^ Corfield 2014d, p. 164.
  24. ^ "Sinpha Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 10 October 2014. Archived from the original on 13 October 2014.
  25. ^ "Ssuksom Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 19 September 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  26. ^ Willoughby, Robert (2014). North Korea: The Bradt Travel Guide (Third ed.). Chalfront: Bradt Travel Guides. p. 201. ISBN 978-1-84162-476-1.
  27. ^ "Insan Revolutionary Battle Site". KCNA. 17 December 2007. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  28. ^ a b "Pochonbo Revolutionary Battle Site Draws Endless Stream of Visitors". KCNA. 3 June 2014. Archived from the original on 11 October 2014.
  29. ^ "Pujon Revolutionary Battle Site of DPRK Introduced by ITAR-TASS". KCNA. 7 August 2012. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  30. ^ "Officials, Members of Women's Union Visit Kim Jong Suk's Birthplace". KCNA. 24 December 2012. Archived from the original on 24 December 2014.
  31. ^ "Samjiyon Revolutionary Battle Site". KCNA. 12 April 2000. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  32. ^ "Taehongdan Revolutionary Battle Site". KCNA. 23 May 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.

Works cited[edit]

External links[edit]