Reynolds, Georgia

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Reynolds, Georgia
A composite of Reynolds in 2012.
A composite of Reynolds in 2012.
Location in Taylor County and the state of Georgia
Location in Taylor County and the state of Georgia
Coordinates: 32°33′33″N 84°5′44″W / 32.55917°N 84.09556°W / 32.55917; -84.09556Coordinates: 32°33′33″N 84°5′44″W / 32.55917°N 84.09556°W / 32.55917; -84.09556
CountryUnited States
StateGeorgia
CountyTaylor
Area
 • Total1.3 sq mi (3.4 km2)
 • Land1.3 sq mi (3.4 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation
440 ft (134 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total1,086
 • Estimate 
(2016)[1]
1,025
 • Density789/sq mi (304.7/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
31076
Area code(s)478
FIPS code13-64876[2]
GNIS feature ID0321535[3]
Websitereynoldsga.com

Reynolds is a town in Taylor County, Georgia, United States. The population was 1,086 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.3 square miles (3.4 km2), of which 1.3 square miles (3.4 km2) is land and 0.75% is water.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880278
18902831.8%
190043654.1%
191052119.5%
192092677.7%
1930880−5.0%
1940871−1.0%
19509064.0%
19601,08720.0%
19701,25315.3%
19801,2983.6%
19901,166−10.2%
20001,036−11.1%
20101,0864.8%
Est. 20161,025[1]−5.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[4]

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 1,036 people, 447 households, and 289 families residing in the town. The population density was 784.9 people per square mile (303.0/km²). There were 495 housing units at an average density of 375.0 per square mile (144.8/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 48.84% White, 50.58% African American, 0.39% Asian, and 0.19% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.77% of the population.

There were 447 households out of which 23.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.4% were married couples living together, 19.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.3% were non-families. 32.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the town, the population was spread out with 22.9% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 23.9% from 25 to 44, 28.1% from 45 to 64, and 18.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females, there were 81.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 76.4 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $25,347, and the median income for a family was $30,179. Males had a median income of $37,917 versus $20,500 for females. The per capita income for the town was $16,071. About 17.9% of families and 23.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 29.7% of those under age 18 and 25.0% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

The Ferdinand Augustus Ricks House was built c. 1905 and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on June 17, 1982.

The Georgia General Assembly incorporated Reynolds in 1865.[5] The community was named after L. C. Reynolds, a railroad official.[6]

Notable people[edit]

  • Earl Little Sr., the father of Malcolm X, was born in Reynolds on July 29, 1890.[7]
  • Samuel Little was born in Reynolds on June 7, 1940. Little may be the most prolific serial killer in American history.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  5. ^ Acts Passed by the General Assembly of Georgia. J. Johnston. 1865. p. 76.
  6. ^ Krakow, Kenneth K. (1975). Georgia Place-Names: Their History and Origins (PDF). Macon, GA: Winship Press. p. 187. ISBN 0-915430-00-2.
  7. ^ Hahn, Steve (March 29, 2012). "If X, Then Why?". Retrieved June 13, 2019 – via The New Republic.
  8. ^ https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/06/08/convicted-murderer-now-linked-more-than-deaths-may-be-most-prolific-killer-us-history/5