Rhamnose

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Rhamnose[1]
Alpha-L-Rhamnopyranose.svg
Names
IUPAC name
6-Deoxy-L-mannopyranose
Systematic IUPAC name
(2R,3R,4R,5R,6S)-6-Methyloxane-2,3,4,5-tetrol
Other names
Isodulcit
α-L-Rhamnose
L-Rhamnose
L-Mannomethylose
α-L-Rha
α-L-Rhamnoside
α-L-Mannomethylose
6-Deoxy-L-mannose
L-Rhamnopyranose
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
DrugBank
KEGG
UNII
Properties
C6H12O5
Molar mass 164.16 g·mol−1
Density 1.41 g/mL
Melting point 91 to 93 °C (196 to 199 °F; 364 to 366 K) (monohydrate)
-99.20·10−6 cm3/mol
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Rhamnose (Rha, Rham) is a naturally occurring deoxy sugar. It can be classified as either a methyl-pentose or a 6-deoxy-hexose. Rhamnose occurs in nature in its L-form as L-rhamnose (6-deoxy-L-mannose). This is unusual, since most of the naturally occurring sugars are in D-form. Exceptions are the methyl pentoses L-fucose and L-rhamnose and the pentose L-arabinose.

Rhamnose can be isolated from Buckthorn (Rhamnus), poison sumac, and plants in the genus Uncaria. Rhamnose is also produced by microalgae belonging to class Bacillariophyceae (diatoms).[2]

Rhamnose is commonly bound to other sugars in nature. It is a common glycone component of glycosides from many plants. Rhamnose is also a component of the outer cell membrane of acid-fast bacteria in the Mycobacterium genus, which includes the organism that causes tuberculosis.[3]

See also[edit]

Disaccharides:

Glycosides:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Merck Index, 11th Edition, 8171.
  2. ^ Brown, M. R. (1991). "The amino-acid and sugar composition of 16 species of microalgae used in mariculture". Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. 145: 79. doi:10.1016/0022-0981(91)90007-J. 
  3. ^ Golan, David E., ed. (2005). "Chapter 35 - Pharmacology of the Bacterial Cell Wall". Principles of Pharmacology: The Pathophysiologic Basis of Drug Therapy. Armen H. Tashjian Jr., Ehrin J. Armstrong, Joshua N. Galanter, April Wang Armstrong, Ramy A. Arnaout, Harris S. Rose. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. p. 569. ISBN 0-7817-4678-7. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Watanabe, K; Takesue, S (1975). "Use of L-rhamnose to Study Irreversible Adsorption of Bacteriophage PL-1 to a Strain of Lactobacillus casei". Journal of General Virology. 28 (1): 29–35. doi:10.1099/0022-1317-28-1-29. PMID 239994.