Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district

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Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district
Interactive map of district boundaries (Providence highlighted)
Representative
  James Langevin
DWarwick
Distribution
  • 84.5% urban
  • 15.5% rural
Population (2019)529,295
Median household
income
$74,180[1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+4[2]

Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in southern and western Rhode Island. The district is currently represented by Democrat James Langevin, who has represented the district since January 2001.

In 2022, Langevin announced he would not run for reelection, Democrats running to replace him include David Segal, former two-term member of the RI House of Representatives and co-founder of national advocacy group Demand Progress; Omar Bah, Founder and executive director of the Refugee Dream Center;[3][4] Ed Pacheco, former member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives;[5], Seth Magaziner, Rhode Island General Treasurer and former candidate for Governor of Rhode Island in 2022.[6] and Michael Neary, former political strategist & John Kasich staffer.[7] Republican candidates include Jessica de la Cruz, member of the Rhode Island Senate from the 23rd district;[8] and Robert Lancia, former state representative and nominee for this district in 2020.[9]

Cities and towns currently in the district[edit]

The district includes:

Recent presidential elections[edit]

Election results from presidential races
Year Office Results
2000 President Al Gore 63% – George W. Bush 31%
2004 President John Kerry 57% – George W. Bush 41%
2008 President Barack Obama 61% – John McCain 37%
2012 President Barack Obama 60% – Mitt Romney 38%
2016 President Hillary Clinton 51% – Donald Trump 44%
2020 President Joe Biden 56% – Donald Trump 42%

List of members representing the district[edit]

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1843
Elisha Reynolds Potter, Jr. (Rhode Island Judge and Congressman).jpg
Elisha R. Potter
Law and Order March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
28th Elected in 1843.
Lost re-election.
LemuelArnold.jpg
Lemuel H. Arnold
Whig March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
29th Elected in 1845.
Retired.
Benjamin Babock Thurston Democratic March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1849
30th Elected in 1847.
Lost re-election.
Nathan Fellows Dixon II.jpg
Nathan F. Dixon
Whig March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1851
31st Elected in 1849.
Retired.
Benjamin Babock Thurston Democratic March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1855
32nd
33rd
34th
Elected in 1851.
Re-elected in 1853.
Re-elected in 1855.
Retired.
Know Nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
WilliamDBrayton.jpg
William Daniel Brayton
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1861
35th
36th
Elected in 1857.
Re-elected in 1859.
Lost re-election.
George Huntington Browne.jpg
George H. Browne
Democratic/
Constitutional Union
March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1863
37th Elected in 1861.
Lost re-election.
Nathan Fellows Dixon II.jpg
Nathan F. Dixon
Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1871
38th
39th
40th
41st
Elected in 1863.
Re-elected in 1865.
Re-elected in 1867.
Re-elected in 1868.
Retired.
JamesMPendleton.jpg
James M. Pendleton
Republican March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1875
42nd
43rd
Elected in 1870.
Re-elected in 1872.
Lost re-election.
LatimerWBallou.jpg
Latimer Whipple Ballou
Republican March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1881
44th
45th
46th
Elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Retired.
Jonathan Chace.jpg
Jonathan Chace
Republican March 4, 1881 –
January 26, 1885
47th
48th
Elected in 1880.
Re-elected in 1882.
Retired to run for U.S. senator and resigned when elected.
Vacant January 26, 1885 –
February 12, 1885
48th
Nathan Fellows Dixon III.jpg
Nathan F. Dixon III
Republican February 12, 1885 –
March 3, 1885
Elected to finish Chace's term.
Retired.
William Almy Pirce Republican March 4, 1885 –
January 25, 1887
49th Elected in 1884.
Seat declared vacant due to election irregularities.
Vacant January 25, 1887 –
February 21, 1887
CharlesHPage.jpg
Charles H. Page
Democratic February 21, 1887 –
March 3, 1887
Elected to finish Pirce's term.
Retired.
Warren O. Arnold.jpg
Warren O. Arnold
Republican March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1891
50th
51st
Elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
Withdrew when neither candidate received a majority in 1890.
CharlesHPage.jpg
Charles H. Page
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
52nd Elected in 1890.
Vacant March 4, 1893 –
April 5, 1893
53rd Seat declared vacant due to failure of candidates to attain majority vote in 1892 election.
CharlesHPage.jpg
Charles H. Page
Democratic April 5, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
Elected to finish vacant term.
Retired.
Warren O. Arnold.jpg
Warren O. Arnold
Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
54th Elected in 1894.
Retired.
Adin B. Capron.jpg
Adin B. Capron
Republican March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1911
55th
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
Elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Retired.
GeorgeHUtter.jpg
George H. Utter
Republican March 4, 1911 –
November 3, 1912
62nd Elected in 1910.
Died.
Vacant November 3, 1912 –
March 3, 1913
US Senator Peter G. Gerry (1920).jpg
Peter G. Gerry
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
63rd Elected in 1912.
Lost re-election.
Walter R. Stiness.jpg
Walter Russell Stiness
Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1923
64th
65th
66th
67th
Elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Retired.
Richard S. Aldrich.jpg
Richard S. Aldrich
Republican March 4, 1923, –
March 3, 1933
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
Elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Retired.
John Matthew O'Connell Democratic March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1939
73rd
74th
75th
Elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Retired.
HarrySandager.jpg
Harry Sandager
Republican January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1941
76th Elected in 1938.
Lost re-election.
Congressman John Edward Fogarty.jpg
John E. Fogarty
Democratic January 3, 1941 –
January 10, 1967
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
Elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Died.
Vacant January 10, 1967 –
March 28, 1967
90th
ROTiernan.png
Robert Tiernan
Democratic March 28, 1967 –
January 3, 1975
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
Elected to finish Fogarty's term.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Lost renomination.
Edward Beard.png
Edward Beard
Democratic January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1981
94th
95th
96th
Elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Lost re-election.
Schneiderclaudine.jpg
Claudine Schneider
Republican January 3, 1981 –
January 3, 1991
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
Elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Jack Reed official portrait.jpg
Jack Reed
Democratic January 3, 1991 –
January 3, 1997
102nd
103rd
104th
Elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Bob Weygand.jpg
Robert Weygand
Democratic January 3, 1997 –
January 3, 2001
105th
106th
Elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Jim Langevin official photo.jpg
James Langevin
Democratic January 3, 2001 –
present
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
117th
Elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.

Retiring at end of term.

Recent election results[edit]

2012[edit]

Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district, 2012 [10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James Langevin (incumbent) 124,067 55.7
Republican Michael G. Riley 78,189 35.1
Independent Abel G. Collins 20,212 9.1
N/A Write-ins 192 0.1
Total votes 222,660 100.0
Democratic hold

2014[edit]

Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district, 2014[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James Langevin (incumbent) 105,716 62.2
Republican Rhue Reis 63,844 37.6
N/A Write-ins 344 0.2
Total votes 169,904 100.0
Democratic hold

2016[edit]

Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district, 2016 [11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James Langevin (incumbent) 133,108 58.1
Republican Rhue R. Reis 70,301 30.7
Independent Jeffrey C. Johnson 16,253 7.1
Independent Salvatore G. Caiozzo 8,942 3.9
N/A Write-ins 544 0.2
Total votes 229,148 100.0
Democratic hold

2018[edit]

Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district, 2018[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James Langevin (incumbent) 126,476 63.5
Republican Sal Caiozzo 72,271 36.3
N/A Write-ins 450 0.2
Total votes 199,197 100.0
Democratic hold

2020[edit]

Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district, 2020[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James Langevin (incumbent) 154,086 58.2
Republican Robert Lancia 109,894 41.5
Write-in 577 0.2
Total votes 264,557 100.0
Democratic hold

Historical district boundaries[edit]

2003–2013

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "My Congressional District".
  2. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  3. ^ Hollingworth, Daniel (January 22, 2022). "Founder of Rhode Island's Refugee Dream Center running for Congress". WJAR. Retrieved January 23, 2022.
  4. ^ Fitzpatrick, Edward (January 22, 2022). "Refugee Dream Center founder Omar Bah to run for Congress - the Boston Globe". The Boston Globe.
  5. ^ Nesi, Ted (January 21, 2022). "Former Rep. Ed Pacheco to seek Langevin seat; de la Cruz mulling a campaign". wpri.com. Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  6. ^ NEWS, NBC 10 (January 26, 2022). "Seth Magaziner announces run for Rhode Island's 2nd Congressional District". WJAR. Retrieved January 26, 2022.
  7. ^ NEWS, WPRI 12 (February 4, 2022). "5th Democrat says he's running for Langevin seat". WPRI. Retrieved February 4, 2022.
  8. ^ Hollingworth, Daniel (January 23, 2022). "Republican Rhode Island State Senator Jessica de la Cruz running for Congress". turnto10.com. WJAR. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  9. ^ "GOP's Lancia announces another run for Congress". AP NEWS. March 22, 2021. Retrieved March 23, 2021.
  10. ^ "RI.gov: Election Results". Government of Rhode Island, Secretary of State. Retrieved November 26, 2012.
  11. ^ a b "2014 General Election Statewide Summary". Rhode Island Board of Elections. December 3, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  12. ^ "Rhode Island Board of Elections: Upcoming Elections". www.elections.state.ri.us. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  13. ^ "2020 General Election - Statewide Summary". Rhode Island Board of Elections. Retrieved November 30, 2020.

Coordinates: 41°34′11″N 71°36′56″W / 41.56972°N 71.61556°W / 41.56972; -71.61556