Rhode Island gubernatorial election, 2014

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Rhode Island gubernatorial election, 2014
Rhode Island
← 2010 November 4, 2014 2018 →
  RI Governor Gina Raimondo Bristol parade (cropped).jpg Allan Fung.jpg Robert J. Healey.jpg
Nominee Gina Raimondo Allan Fung Robert J. Healey
Party Democratic Republican Moderate
Popular vote 131,452 117,106 69,070
Percentage 40.7% 36.2% 21.4%

Rhode Island gubernatorial election, 2014 results by municipality.svg

Governor before election

Lincoln Chafee
Democratic

Elected Governor

Gina Raimondo
Democratic

The 2014 Rhode Island gubernatorial election took place on November 4, 2014, to elect the Governor of Rhode Island, concurrently with the election of Rhode Island's Class II U.S. Senate seat, as well as other elections to the United States Senate in other states and elections to the United States House of Representatives and various state and local elections.

Incumbent Democratic Governor Lincoln Chafee was eligible to run for re-election to a second term but decided to retire. In primary elections held on September 9, 2014, the Democrats nominated Rhode Island Treasurer Gina Raimondo and the Republicans nominated Cranston Mayor Allan Fung. Also on the ballot were Robert J. Healey of the Moderate Party and two Independent candidates. Raimondo won the election, becoming the first Democrat to be elected governor since Bruce Sundlun in 1992 (Chafee had been elected as an Independent in 2010, switching to the Democratic Party during his term). Raimondo became the first female Governor in Rhode Island history.

Background[edit]

In the 2010 gubernatorial election, Republican incumbent Donald Carcieri was term-limited and unable to seek a third term in office. The Republicans nominated businessman John Robitaille and the Democrats nominated State Treasurer Frank T. Caprio. Also contesting the election were Moderate Party nominee Ken Block and Lincoln Chafee, who served as a Republican U.S. Senator from 1999 to 2007. After losing a bid for re-election in 2006, Chafee left the Republican Party and became an Independent, running for governor as such. After a close three-way race between Chafee, Robitaille and Caprio, Chafee won the election with a plurality, taking 36% to Robitaille's 34%, Caprio's 23% and Block's 6%.

After constant speculation during his term, Chafee officially joined the Democratic Party on May 30, 2013. He had previously indicated that he might run for re-election as an Independent or a Democrat.[1] In the face of low approval ratings, polling showing him trailing in both the Democratic primary and the general election, and with weak fundraising, Chafee announced on September 4, 2013 that he would not run for re-election.[2][3] Chafee thus became just the fourth Governor in the history of Rhode Island to decline to seek a second term, after Byron Diman in 1847, Royal C. Taft in 1889 and William S. Flynn in 1924.[4]

Democratic primary[edit]

Gina Raimondo and Angel Taveras announced their campaigns in late 2013 and the race initially seemed to be between the more fiscally moderate Raimondo and the more progressive Taveras. However, the entry of Clay Pell into the race complicated things. Unions who had criticised Raimondo for cutting pension benefits and investing in hedge funds during her tenure as Treasurer and for fundraising from Wall Street and national lobbyists were split between whether to back Taveras or Pell. A coalition of unions including firefighters, police, supermarket clerks and city employees backed Taveras, whereas the powerful teachers' unions backed Pell, unimpressed with Taveras' support for charter schools. Raimondo drew support from non-union and private sector workers and some private sector unions including iron workers. Pell spent over $3.4 million of his own money and ran a positive campaign, but he was much criticised for his inexperience and lack of ties to Rhode Island. Taveras emphasised his background as the son of poor Dominican immigrants to appeal to Latino and working-class voters. All three candidates agreed not to seek the endorsement of the state Democratic Party. Ultimately, Taveras and Pell took an almost equal share of the vote as progressive Democrats split their vote between the two, allowing Raimondo to win with a plurality. Raimondo won 36 of the state's 39 municipalities. Taveras won Central Falls and Pell won Burrillville and Foster.[5]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Withdrew[edit]

Declined[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Todd
Giroux
Clay
Pell
Gina
Raimondo
Angel
Taveras
Other/
Undecided
Fleming & Associates August 11–14, 2014 503 ± 4.38% 1.4% 25.6% 32.2% 26.8% 12.9%
Fleming & Associates May 27–30, 2014 506 ± 4.38% 1.6% 11.5% 29.2% 33.4% 24.3%
Brown University April 3–5, 2014 395 ± 4.9% 9.6% 29.4% 25.8% 35.2%
Fleming & Associates February 3–6, 2014 503 ± 4.38% 1.2% 14.7% 27% 31.2% 25.9%
Brown University October 2–5, 2013 433 ± 4.5% 42% 33.6% 24.4%
Garin-Hart-Yang^ September 10–12, 2013 400 ± 5% 30% 49% 21%
  • ^ Internal poll for the Angel Taveras Campaign

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gina Raimondo 53,990 42.15
Democratic Angel Taveras 37,326 29.14
Democratic Clay Pell 34,515 26.94
Democratic Todd Giroux 2,264 1.77
Total votes 128,095 100

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Declined[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Ken
Block
Allan
Fung
Other/
Undecided
Fabrizio, Lee & Ass. * April 2014 300 ± ? 46% 37% 17%
Brown University April 3–5, 2014 86 ± 10.6% 36% 31.4% 38.5%
Fabrizio, Lee & Ass. * October 2013  ? ± ? 25% 53% 22%
  • * Internal poll for the Ken Block campaign

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Allan Fung 17,530 54.9
Republican Ken Block 14,399 45.1
Total votes 31,929 100

Other parties[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Withdrew[edit]

  • Ken Block (Moderate), nominee for Governor in 2010 (switched to Republican primary)[15]
  • James Spooner (Moderate)[23]

Removed from ballot[edit]

  • Thomas Davis (Independent)
  • Christopher Reynolds (Independent)
  • Anna Winograd Vrankar (Compassion)

Declined[edit]

  • Gina Raimondo (Independent), Democratic Treasurer of Rhode Island (won the Democratic primary)[24]

General election[edit]

Union voter dissatisfaction with Raimondo carried over into the general election, with one poll finding they backed Republican nominee Alan Fung over her by 42% to 30%.[25] Moderate Party nominee Robert J. Healey won 22% of the vote, having spent $35.31 to receive 67,707 votes, or $0.0005 (five ten-thousandths of a dollar) for each vote he received.[26] He later joked, "It's amazing what $35 can do. As I've been saying, if we only spent $75, $80, we might've won the race."[27]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking
Cook Political Report[28] Lean D
Daily Kos Elections[29] Likely D
Governing[30] Lean D
RealClearPolitics[31] Toss-Up
The Rothenberg Political Report[32] Likely D
Sabato's Crystal Ball[33] Likely D

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Gina
Raimondo (D)
Allan
Fung (R)
Robert J.
Healey (M)
Other Undecided
Brown University October 25–26, 2014 500 ± 4.4% 39.6% 39% 13% 1.4%[34] 11.2%
CBS News/NYT/YouGov October 16–23, 2014 866 ± 6% 40% 35% 4% 21%
Brown University October 14–17, 2014 1,129 ± 2.9% 41.6% 30.5% 9.1% 0.8%[35] 18%
Fleming & Associates October 6–9, 2014 505 ± 4% 41.8% 35.6% 8.1% 0.8%[36] 13.7%
CBS News/NYT/YouGov September 20–October 1, 2014 724 ± 4% 41% 38% 2% 19%
Rasmussen Reports September 23–25, 2014 750 ± 4% 42% 37% 11% 11%
Public Opinion Strategies* September 10–11, 2014 500 ± 4.38% 42% 42% 16%
Brown University October 2–5, 2013 638 ± 3.9% 37.6% 35.9% 26.5%
Public Policy Polling January 28–30, 2013 614 ± 4% 46% 27% 12%[37] 14%
  • * Internal poll for the Allan Fung campaign

Results[edit]

Election results[edit]

Rhode Island gubernatorial election, 2014[38]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Gina Raimondo 131,899 40.7 +17.7
Republican Allan Fung 117,428 36.2 +2.6
Moderate Robert J. Healey 69,278 21.4 +14.9
Independent Kate Fletcher 3,483 1.1
Independent Leon Kayarian 1,228 0.4
n/a Write-ins 739 0.2
Plurality 14,461 4.5
Turnout 324,045
Democratic hold Swing

By municipality[edit]

Gina Raimondo
Democratic
Allan Fung
Republican
Robert J. Healey
Moderate
Others Total
Municipality Votes  % Votes  % Votes  % Votes  %
Barrington 3,566 49.6% 2,022 28.1% 1,554 21.6% 50 0.7% 7,192
Bristol 2,628 35.7% 1,959 26.6% 2,709 36.8% 75 1.0% 7,368
Burrillville 1,334 28.6% 1,861 39.9% 1,371 29.4% 104 2.2% 4,670
Central Falls 1,359 66.4% 358 17.5% 280 13.7% 50 2.4% 2,047
Charlestown 1,177 38.0% 1,137 36.7% 728 23.5% 59 1.9% 3,101
Coventry 3,812 30.2% 4,979 39.4% 3,610 28.6% 233 1.8% 12,634
Cranston 8,159 30.2% 14,853 55.0% 3,716 13.8% 278 1.0% 27,006
Cumberland 4,661 39.9% 4,325 37.0% 2,478 21.2% 220 1.9% 11,684
East Greenwich 2,364 42.3% 2,315 41.4% 848 15.2% 65 1.2% 5,592
East Providence 5,958 43.5% 3,718 27.1% 3,804 27.8% 225 1.6% 13,705
Exeter 771 28.4% 1,147 42.3% 742 27.3% 53 2.0% 2,713
Foster 534 28.0% 732 38.3% 604 31.6% 40 2.1% 1,910
Glocester 963 27.2% 1,503 42.5% 1,019 28.8% 55 1.5% 3,540
Hopkinton 836 30.9% 1,080 39.9% 723 26.7% 68 2.3% 2,707
Jamestown 1,325 46.2% 901 31.4% 590 20.6% 63 1.9% 2,879
Johnston 3,270 32.6% 4,502 44.9% 2,126 21.2% 134 1.5% 10,032
Lincoln 2,974 36.2% 3,249 39.6% 1,870 22.8% 119 1.4% 8,212
Little Compton 674 41.2% 648 39.7% 288 17.6% 22 1.4% 1,632
Middletown 2,241 41.9% 1,902 35.5% 1,090 20.4% 119 2.3% 5,352
Narragansett 2,395 39.3% 2,410 39.6% 1,198 19.7% 84 1.4% 6,087
New Shoreham 365 50.3% 174 24.0% 173 23.8% 14 1.9% 726
Newport 3,734 49.4% 2,312 30.6% 1,331 17.6% 177 2.3% 7,554
North Kingstown 4,166 37.6% 4,305 38.8% 2,422 21.8% 195 1.7% 11,088
North Providence 4,013 36.1% 4,505 40.6% 2,414 21.7% 170 1.6% 11,102
North Smithfield 1,456 33.2% 1,870 42.7% 986 22.5% 68 1.6% 4,380
Pawtucket 7,144 51.8% 3,391 24.6% 2,960 21.5% 284 2.1% 13,779
Portsmouth 2,824 41.1% 2,477 36.1% 1,426 20.8% 136 2.0% 6,863
Providence 24,662 65.0% 8,445 22.3% 4,116 10.8% 720 1.9% 37,943
Richmond 851 29.5% 1,153 40.0% 825 28.6% 53 1.8% 2,882
Scituate 1,170 25.5% 2,203 48.1% 1,146 25.0% 63 1.3% 4,582
Smithfield 2,587 33.7% 3,241 42.2% 1,725 22.5% 119 1.6% 7,672
South Kingstown 4,606 43.1% 3,562 33.3% 2,291 21.4% 233 2.2% 10,692
Tiverton 2,090 39.8% 1,882 35.9% 1,173 22.4% 103 2.0% 5,248
Warren 1,118 29.6% 825 21.9% 1,797 47.6% 33 0.9% 3,773
Warwick 10,559 35.0% 11,383 37.7% 7,795 25.8% 428 1.4% 30,165
West Greenwich 605 25.0% 1,097 45.3% 684 28.3% 33 1.3% 2,419
West Warwick 2,836 34.6% 3,235 39.4% 2,000 24.4% 134 1.6% 8,205
Westerly 3,094 41.3% 3,004 40.1% 1,195 16.0% 197 2.6% 7,490
Woonsocket 3,018 40.6% 2,763 37.2% 1,471 19.8% 182 2.4% 7,434

References[edit]

  1. ^ Klepper, David (December 14, 2012). "RI Gov. Chafee open to running for 2nd term as Dem". Associated Press. Boston.com. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  2. ^ Sullivan, Sean (September 4, 2013). "Why Lincoln Chafee's decision not to run for reelection is more good news for Democrats". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 6, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b Taylor, Jessica (September 4, 2013). "Gov. Chafee won't run for a second term". NBC News. Retrieved September 6, 2013. 
  4. ^ Ostermeier, Eric (September 6, 2013). "Chafee Just 4th Rhode Island Governor Since 1790 to Pass On 2nd Term". Smart Politics. Retrieved September 6, 2013. 
  5. ^ Stephanie Simon (September 8, 2014). "Dem divisions on display in Rhode Island race". Politico. Retrieved September 25, 2015. 
  6. ^ Faccenda, Anthony (October 4, 2013). "The Scoop: Giroux to Run for Gov, RI Tea Party Talks Obamacare". GoLocalProv. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  7. ^ The Associated Press (January 27, 2014). "Clay Pell, husband of Michelle Kwan, to run for Rhode Island gov". POLITICO. Retrieved January 27, 2014. 
  8. ^ Nesi, Ted (December 18, 2013). "Gina Raimondo announces she'll run for governor". WPRI-TV. Retrieved December 18, 2013. 
  9. ^ Gregg, Katherine (October 26, 2013). "Providence Mayor Taveras confirms run for R.I. governor". The Providence Journal. Retrieved October 28, 2013. 
  10. ^ a b DeQuattro, Dee (April 30, 2013). "Almonte to run for General Treasurer, not Governor". ABC 6. Retrieved May 1, 2013. 
  11. ^ Nesi, Ted (May 16, 2013). "Ernie Almonte abandons campaign for governor to run for RI treasurer". WPRI. Retrieved May 17, 2013. 
  12. ^ Lt. Gov. Roberts won't challenge Chafee
  13. ^ "Former Congressman Bob Weygand mulling run for governor - WPRI.com Blogs". Retrieved September 12, 2014. 
  14. ^ a b "2014 Statewide Primary". State of Rhode Island Board of Elections. Retrieved September 10, 2014. 
  15. ^ a b Gregg, Katherine (October 28, 2013). "Ken Block, Moderate Party's 2010 candidate for governor, seeking GOP nomination in 2014". The Providence Journal. Retrieved October 28, 2013. 
  16. ^ Rob Borkowski (November 4, 2013). "Mayor Fung Announces Bid For Governor". Woonsocket Patch. Retrieved November 4, 2013. 
  17. ^ Nesi, Ted (July 12, 2013). "Warwick's Avedisian may run for lieutenant governor in '14". WPRI-TV. Retrieved August 10, 2013. 
  18. ^ Kalunian, Kim (May 17, 2013). "NEWS: Brendan Doherty will not seek office in 2014". Retrieved May 20, 2013. 
  19. ^ "Dan McGowan on Twitter: "Barry Hinckley tells me he has no interest in running for Governor. Clears field for @peterbaptista"". Retrieved September 12, 2014. 
  20. ^ "Robitaille says no plans to run for RI governor". Associated Press. NBC 10. October 18, 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  21. ^ Towne, Shaun (September 12, 2014). "Moderate candidate Healey could impact governor's race". WPRI. Retrieved September 14, 2014. 
  22. ^ a b "12 candidates file papers in RI governor's race". NBC 10 News. June 25, 2014. Retrieved June 26, 2014. 
  23. ^ Katherine Gregg (September 15, 2014). "R.I. GOP challenges Healey as Moderate Party's 11th-hour candidate for governor". Providence Journal. Retrieved September 24, 2014. 
  24. ^ Nesi, Ted (October 26, 2013). "The Saturday Morning Post: Quick hits on politics & more in RI". WPRI. Retrieved October 29, 2013. 
  25. ^ "Pension Cuts Cost Democrat Union Support in Rhode Island". Wall Street Journal. October 28, 2014. Retrieved November 7, 2014. 
  26. ^ "Bob Healey spent $0.0005 for every vote he got". WPRI-12. November 5, 2014. Retrieved November 7, 2014. 
  27. ^ "Healey: It's amazing what $35 can do". WPRI-12. November 5, 2014. Retrieved November 7, 2014. 
  28. ^ "Governor Maps". Retrieved September 12, 2014. 
  29. ^ "Daily Kos Elections gubernatorial race ratings (2013-14)". Retrieved September 12, 2014. 
  30. ^ "Handicapping the 2013-2014 Governors Races: The Democrats". Retrieved September 12, 2014. 
  31. ^ "RealClearPolitics - 2014 Election Maps - 2014 Governor Races". Retrieved September 12, 2014. 
  32. ^ David Russell. "Gubernatorial Ratings - The Rothenberg Political Report". Retrieved September 12, 2014. 
  33. ^ "Larry J. Sabato's Crystal Ball  » 2014 Governor". Retrieved September 12, 2014. 
  34. ^ Kate Fletcher (I) 1.2%, Leon Kayarian (I) 0.2%
  35. ^ Kate Fletcher (I) 0.3%, Leon Kayarian (I) 0.5%
  36. ^ Kate Fletcher (I) 0.4%, Leon Kayarian (I) 0.4%
  37. ^ Ken Block (I)
  38. ^ http://www.ri.gov/election/results/2014/general_election/

External links[edit]

Official campaign websites (Archived)