Rhythm Activism

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Rhythm Activism
Origin Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Genres Anarcho-punk, post-punk, folk, cabaret
Years active 1986 (1986)–1998 (1998)
Labels Les Pages Noires
G7 Welcoming Committee
Website nothingness.org/music/rhythm
Past members Sylvain Côté, Norman Nawrocki

Rhythm Activism was a Montreal-based musical collective revolving around the core duo of Sylvain Côté and Norman Nawrocki. The group, formed in 1985 as a poetry and music ensemble,[1] evolved into performing a politically radical brand of "rock 'n roll cabaret" and incorporating elements of post-punk and folk into their music.[2] They featured on 36 releases.[3]

On several occasions, the band recorded and released albums on just a few days' notice, to support political activist campaigns such as the Oka Crisis of 1990 and a Quebec students' strike. Most of their material was released on their own Les Pages Noires label, although their 15th and final album Jesus Was Gay was distributed on G7 Welcoming Committee Records.[4]

The band's song "Leo Lachance" appears on the 1999 G7 compilation Return of the Read Menace,[5] and their song "Down in the Mines" appears on the 2005 G7 compilation Take Penacilin Now.[6]

Rhythm Activism also performed theatre shows in Montreal, including the "community circus cabaret comedy" Le Cirque en Ca$h in 1997 and 98.[3][7][8] The band toured with DOA, John Giorno, Mecca Normal[9] and Linton Kwesi Johnson.[10]

Discography[edit]

  • Rhythm Activism (1986)[11]
  • Rhythm Activism Live (1987)[12]
  • Resist Much, Obey Little (1987)[13]
  • Louis Riel in China (1988)
  • Un logement pour une chanson (1990)
  • Fight the Hike! (1990)
  • Perogies, Pasta and Liberty (1990)
  • Oka (1990)
  • War is the Health of the State (1991)
  • Oka II (1992)
  • Tumbleweed (1993)
  • Blood & Mud (1994)[14]
  • More Kick! (1995)
  • Buffalo, Burgers & Beer (1995)
  • Jesus Was Gay (1998)[4]

Videography[edit]

  • That's the way we tie our shoes : a recipe by Rhythm Activism (1996)
  • Alive and kicking : the first ten years of Rhythm Activism (1997)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "Rhythm Activism". g7welcomingcommittee.com. G7 Welcoming Committee Records. Retrieved 31 October 2013. 
  2. ^ Jonathan Patrick (26 November 1998). "Rock in opposition: Anarchists Rhythm Activism use laughter as a weapon". Eye Weekly.com. Toronto Star Newspapers Limited. Retrieved 4 November 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Rhythm Activism". Nothingness.org. Retrieved 31 October 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Jesus Was Gay". g7welcomingcommittee.com. G7 Welcoming Committee Records. Retrieved 31 October 2013. 
  5. ^ "Return of the Read Menace". g7welcomingcommittee.com. G7 Welcoming Committee Records. Retrieved 31 October 2013. 
  6. ^ "Take Penacilin Now". g7welcomingcommittee.com. G7 Welcoming Committee Records. Retrieved 31 October 2013. 
  7. ^ Margo Vizbara. "Acting against poverty: Rhythm Activism educates through its unique shows". montreal.com. Retrieved 31 October 2013. 
  8. ^ "Rhythm Activism: La vie en rose". voir.ca (in French). 3 December 1998. Retrieved 31 October 2013. 
  9. ^ "Norman Nawrocki's biography". Nothingness.org. Retrieved 31 October 2013. 
  10. ^ Rana Bose. "I have never hit anyone with my violin: An interview with Norman Nawrocki". montrealserai.com. Retrieved 31 October 2013. 
  11. ^ "Rhythm Activism" (sound recording), Ottawa: Library and Archives Canada, OCLC 83071593, AMICUS No. 10304210, retrieved 31 October 2013 
  12. ^ "Live" (sound recording) / Rhythm Activism, Ottawa: Library and Archives Canada, OCLC 83939434, AMICUS No. 10360090, retrieved 31 October 2013 
  13. ^ "Resist much, obey little" (sound recording) / Rhythm Activism, Ottawa: Library and Archives Canada, OCLC 78487318, AMICUS No. 10360093, retrieved 31 October 2013 
  14. ^ "Blood and Mud: A CD Dedicated to the Zapatistas". spunk.org. Retrieved 31 October 2013. 

External links[edit]