Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup

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Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup
Current season, competition or edition:
Current sports event 2018 FIG Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup Series
Sport Gymnastics
Founded 1983
Countries Worldwide

The Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup is a competition for rhythmic gymnastics sanctioned by the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique (FIG). It is one of the few tournaments in rhythmic gymnastics officially organized by FIG, as well as the World Championships, the gymnastics competitions at the Olympic Games and the Youth Olympics and the rhythmic gymnastics events at the World Games.[1] The World Cup series should not be confused with the Rhythmic Gymnastics Grand Prix Series, which is neither officially organized nor promoted by FIG.

History[edit]

In 1983, FIG decided to hold a World Cup event in rhythmic gymnastics. The event was staged as an alternative to the World Championships, a tournament held, at the time, every four years. The World Cup aimed to bringing together elite gymnasts in all around competition and in apparatus finals. Standalone World Cup tournaments were staged in 1983, 1986 and 1990, and have been retroactively called World Cup Finals by the International Gymnastics Federation.[2]

Taking inspiration from the Grand Prix Series established in 1994, the FIG Executive Committee made the decision to revive the World Cup in 1999 as a series of tournament which served as qualification stages, over the course of two years, for a World Cup Final event. The different stages, sometimes referred to as World Cup Qualifiers, mostly served the purpose to award points for individual gymnasts and groups according to their placement. These points would be added up after a period of two years in order to qualify a limited number of athletes for the biennial World Cup Final event.[2]

Five World Cup Final events were staged in even years from 2000 to 2008. For example, the World Cup Final tournament in 2000 served as the last stage of a series of competitions through the 1999–2000 season. At the World Cup Final, gold, silver and bronze medals were awarded to individual athletes (in four different apparatuses) and groups (in two different routines) after a qualification phase and a final presentation.[3] The World Cup Final format was kept until 2008; the International Gymnastics Federation has decided not to host a single, standalone World Cup Final event after the 2008 World Cup Final.[3]

Since 2009 the World Cup is staged through a series of events held annually, as opposed to the biennial format adopted from 1999 to 2008, or the standalone event format adopted from 1983 to 1990.

Current format[edit]

The current format of the World Cup divides the tournament in a series of events staged annually. In each of the stages, the top three gymnasts or groups in each apparatus, as well as in the all-around competition, are awarded medals and prize money. The stages usually attract the best rhythmic gymnasts in the world, with a considerable number of medalists at the Olympic Games and the World Championships competing in each event. FIG may also allow federations to organize parallel events to the World Cup series, such as junior tournaments. These tournaments, however, are not official FIG competitions and are not considered part of the World Cup Series.[1][4]

After each stage, gymnasts are awarded points according to their placement (not only in medal positions) in the all-around and each of the four apparatuses. Groups are also awarded points according to placement in the all-around competition and each of the two routines. After the last event of the World Cup series, the 3 or 4 best results at the World Cup stages count towards a ranking list. The same is true for the World Challenge Cup series. The individual gymnast (or group) with the highest number of points in each apparatus (or each routine) is then declared the winner of the World Cup series. A separate ranking also defines the winners in each apparatus (or each routine) of the World Challenge Cup series. Winners receive a cup at the end of the series.[5]

World Cup Final[edit]

Eight World Cup Finals were held from 1983 to 2008. From 1983 to 1990, the World Cup was held as a standalone event in three occasions: 1983, 1986 and 1990. From 1999 to 2008, World Cup Finals were held in even years after a two-year long series that served as qualification stages for the World Cup Final event. [6][7] The first event under this format, formally considered the Fourth World Cup Final, was staged in 2000, and the last one in 2008.[2] Currently, World Cup Finals are no longer held for any of the FIG disciplines.

Year Event Format Location Ref.
1983 1st World Cup Final Individuals and teams Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Belgrade [2][8]
1986 2nd World Cup Final Individuals and teams Japan Tokyo [2][9]
1990 3rd World Cup Final Individuals and teams Belgium Brussels [2]
2000 4th World Cup Final Individuals United Kingdom Glasgow [2]
2002 5th World Cup Final Individuals Germany Stuttgart [2]
2004 6th World Cup Final Individuals and groups Russia Moscow [2]
2006 7th World Cup Final Individuals and groups Japan Mie [2]
2008 8th World Cup Final Individuals and groups Spain Benidorm [2][10]

World Cup Series[edit]

Since 2009, the World Cup is competed as a series of events held in different countries throughout the period of one year.[1] From 2009 to 2016, events at the Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup series were divided in Category A and Category B; Category A events were reserved for invited athletes, while Category B events were open to all athletes. Since 2017, the World Cup series is divided in: 1) the World Cup series; and 2) the World Challenge Cup series. All of the World Cup and World Challenge Cup events are open to all athletes.[11]

Year Series Format Category A events Category B events Ref.
2009 2009 FIG Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup Series Individuals and groups 6 2 [12][13]
2010 2010 FIG Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup Series Individuals and groups 6 2 [12][14]
2011 2011 FIG Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup Series Individuals and groups 1 9 [12][15]
2012 2012 FIG Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup Series Individuals and groups 1 6 [12][16]
2013 2013 FIG Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup Series Individuals and groups 1 7 [12][17][18]
2014 2014 FIG Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup Series Individuals and groups 1 8 [12][19][20]
2015 2015 FIG Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup Series Individuals and groups 0 7 [12][21][22]
2016 2016 FIG Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup Series Individuals and groups 0 10 [12][23][24]
Year Series Format World Cup events Challenge Cup events Ref.
2017 2017 FIG Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup Series Individuals and groups 4 5 [12]
2018 2018 FIG Rhythmic Gymnastics World Cup Series Individuals and groups 4 4 [25]

All-time medal table[edit]

What follows are two tables containing the total number of medals earned historically at the World Cup events. Results accounted for include: 1) the eight editions of the World Cup Final from 1983 to 2008, excluding medals earned in qualifying stages; and 2) all of the stages from the World Cup Series (including Category A and Category B events) from 2009 to 2017, as well as all of the stages from the World Challenge Cup events in 2017. Overall, the total number of nations which earned at least one medal at the World Cup Final, or at one of the different stages of the World Cup and World Challenge Cup Series (from 2009 to 2017) is considerably smaller when compared to the number of nations which earned at least one medal at the Artistic Gymnastics World Cup circuit.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Technical Regulations 2018" (PDF). International Gymnastics Federation. Retrieved March 1, 2018. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique-World Cup Finals". International Gymnastics Federation. Retrieved 2017-05-02. 
  3. ^ a b International Federation of Gymnastics. "Rhythmic Gymnastics WORLD CUP FINALS" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-12-13. Retrieved 2017-05-02. 
  4. ^ "V Sankt-Peterburge proshel mezhdunarodnyi yuniorskii turnir po khudozhestvennoi gimnastike" В Санкт-Петербурге прошел международный юниорский турнир по художественной гимнастике [International rhythmic gymnastics tournament held in Saint Petersburg] (in Russian). R-gymnastics.com. Retrieved 2017-05-06. 
  5. ^ FIG - World Cup rules
  6. ^ "GYMmedia Event Calendar 1999". Archived from the original on August 21, 2002. Retrieved May 6, 2017. 
  7. ^ "GYMmedia Event Calendar 1999 [sic]". Archived from the original on May 17, 2002. Retrieved May 6, 2017. 
  8. ^ "1983 Belgrade World Cup Final Results". r-gymnast.bplaced.net. 
  9. ^ "1986 Tokyo World Cup Final Results". r-gymnast.bplaced.net. 
  10. ^ "2008 World Cup Final results". gymmedia. 
  11. ^ "Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique - Rhythmic Gymnastics Rules". International Gymnastics Federation. Retrieved 2017-05-02. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i Official FIG database - search results
  13. ^ Gym Media 2009 calendar
  14. ^ Gym Media 2010 calendar
  15. ^ Gym Media 2011 calendar
  16. ^ Gym Media 2012 calendar
  17. ^ RG Calendar 2013 Archived 2013-09-22 at the Wayback Machine.
  18. ^ 2013 RG Results
  19. ^ RG Calendar 2014
  20. ^ 2014 RG Results
  21. ^ RG Calendar 2015
  22. ^ 2015 RG Results
  23. ^ 2016 RG Results
  24. ^ "2016 Rhythmic Gymnastics Calendar". rg4u.clan. 
  25. ^ "List of International Rhythmic Gymnastics Tournaments". RG4U. Retrieved February 27, 2018.