Rich Anderson (Virginia politician)

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Rich Anderson
Chair of the Virginia Republican Party
Assumed office
August 15, 2020
Preceded byJack Wilson
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
from the 51st district
In office
January 13, 2010 – January 10, 2018
Preceded byPaul F. Nichols
Succeeded byHala Ayala
Personal details
Born (1955-05-30) May 30, 1955 (age 67)
Roanoke, Virginia, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
SpouseRuth Valentine
EducationVirginia Tech (BA)
Webster University (MPA)
WebsiteOfficial website
Military service
Allegiance United States
Branch/service United States Air Force
Years of service1979–2009
RankColonel (USAF)
Brigadier General (CAP)
CommandsNational Commander of the Civil Air Patrol (1993–1996)

Richard L. "Rich" Anderson (born May 30, 1955) is an American politician. From 2010 through 2018 he served in the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 51st district in the Prince William County suburbs of Washington, D.C. He is a member of the Republican Party.[1] Anderson lost his reelection bid in Virginia's November 2017 election. Since 2020, Anderson serves as the Chairman of the Republican Party of Virginia.

Anderson chaired the House Committee on Science and Technology (2010–2017), and served on the House committees on Finance (2010–2017), General Laws (2010–2017), and Transportation (2012–2017).[2]

Early life and career[edit]

Anderson was born in Roanoke, Virginia, and attended Northside High School there. He received a B.A. degree in political science from Virginia Tech in 1979.[1]

Anderson was commissioned in the United States Air Force after graduation, serving as a nuclear missile operations officer in Titan II and Minuteman II intercontinental ballistic missile units, as well as other command and staff positions. He received an M.A. in public administration from Webster University in 1982. He also attended the Air War College, Air Command and Staff College and Armed Forces Staff College. He retired in 2009 in the rank of colonel. His wife, the former Ruth Valentine, also served in the U.S. Air Force for 21 years.[1][3]

Anderson joined the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) as a cadet in 1969, and has been a CAP member since then. He served as National Commander with the CAP rank of brigadier general August 1993 – August 1996,[4] and was chairman of the CAP Board of Governors February 2011 – February 2013.[5]

Political career[edit]

After his U.S. Air Force retirement, Anderson entered politics, gaining the Republican nomination for the Virginia House of Delegates 51st district in the 2009 election. He defeated first-term Democrat Paul F. Nichols by less than two percentage points.[6] Anderson ran unopposed in 2011, and defeated Democrat Reed Heddleston by roughly 2,000 votes in 2013. In 2015, Anderson ran unopposed for re-election to his fourth term in office.

Anderson was chair of the Virginia House Committee on Science and Technology.

Electoral history[edit]

After his U.S. Air Force retirement, Anderson entered politics, gaining the Republican nomination for the Virginia House of Delegates 51st district in the 2009 election. He defeated first-term Democrat Paul F. Nichols by less than two percentage points.[7]

Date Election Candidate Party Votes %
Virginia House of Delegates, 51st district
Nov 3, 2009[8] General Richard L. Anderson Republican 7,940 50.78
Paul F. Nichols Democratic 7,671 49.05
Write Ins 25 0.15
Incumbent lost; seat switched from Democratic to Republican
Nov 8, 2011[9] General Richard L. Anderson Republican 11,296 95.49
Write Ins 533 4.50

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Bio for Richard L. Anderson". Virginia House of Delegates. Retrieved June 7, 2013.
  2. ^ "Legislative Information System". Virginia General Assembly. Archived from the original on December 19, 1996. Retrieved June 7, 2013.
  3. ^ "About Del Rich Anderson". Rich Anderson for Delegate. Retrieved June 7, 2013.
  4. ^ "CAP's National Commander" (PDF). Retrieved February 11, 2011.
  5. ^ "Anderson, Speigel Chosen To Lead CAP's Board of Governors". December 21, 2010. Retrieved February 11, 2011.
  6. ^ "Virginia Elections Database » 2009 House of Delegates General Election District 51".
  7. ^ "Hampton Roads - 2009 election results". Retrieved February 25, 2010.
  8. ^ "November 2009 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on January 3, 2014. Retrieved June 7, 2013.
  9. ^ "November 2011 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on January 3, 2014. Retrieved June 7, 2013.

External links[edit]

Party political offices
Preceded by Chair of the Virginia Republican Party
2020–present
Incumbent