Richard J. Cardamone

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Richard J. Cardamone
Senior Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
In office
November 13, 1993 – October 15, 2015
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
In office
October 29, 1981 – November 13, 1993
Appointed by Ronald Reagan
Preceded by William Mulligan
Succeeded by José Cabranes
Personal details
Born (1925-10-10)October 10, 1925
Utica, New York, U.S.
Died October 16, 2015(2015-10-16) (aged 90)
Clinton, New York, U.S.
Alma mater Harvard University
Syracuse University

Richard J. Cardamone (October 10, 1925 – October 16, 2015) was a United States federal judge.

Early life and career[edit]

Born in Utica, New York in 1925,[1] Cardamone was in the United States Navy during World War II, from 1943 to 1946, and then received a B.A. from Harvard University in 1948 and an LL.B. from Syracuse University College of Law in 1952. He then entered private practice in Utica, until 1962.

Judicial service[edit]

In 1962 Cardamone began his judicial career by gaining election to the New York State Supreme Court, serving as a Justice from 1963 to 1981. On October 1, 1981, Cardamone was nominated by President Ronald Reagan to a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit vacated by William Hughes Mulligan. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on October 29, 1981, and received his commission the same day. Cardamone assumed senior status on November 13, 1993. Cardamone died on October 16, 2015.[2]

Reported Decisions[edit]

Cardamone began his opinion in Demoret v. Zegarelli, 451 F.3d 140 (2d Cir. 2006) by noting a defendant's connection to a classic American short story:

References[edit]

  1. ^ W. Stuart Dornette; Robert R. Cross (1986). Federal Judiciary Almanac. Wiley law publications. p. 21. ISBN 0471839019. 
  2. ^ Former judge with local ties, dies at 90

Sources[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
William Mulligan
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
1981–1993
Succeeded by
José Cabranes