Richard James Kerr

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Richard James Kerr (born October 4, 1935) was Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 1989 to 1992.

He was born in Fort Smith, Arkansas. He received a B.A. in history from the University of Oregon and started graduate work there too.[1] Kerr had a 32-year career with the CIA which included involvement in the retaliatory bombing raids against Libya in 1986[2] and culminated with key roles in managing U.S. intelligence related to the near nuclear stand-off between India and Pakistan in 1990[3] and the attempted coup against Boris Yeltsin in August, 1991.[4]

In 1991, Kerr was presented with the Presidential Citizens Medal by President George H. W. Bush.[5]

From 1996 to 2002, "Dick" Kerr also served on the Board of Directors for the Aegis Research Corporation of Rosslyn and later Falls Church, Virginia.[6] He continues to serve on corporate boards and is a compliance observer of the 1998 Belfast Agreement.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Richard James Kerr". CIA. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  2. ^ Prados, John, President's Secret Wars, CIA and Pentagon Covert Operations from World War II through IRANSCAM, New York, Quill, 1986, 385.
  3. ^ Andrew, Christopher, For the President's Eyes Only, Secret Intelligence and the American Presidency from Washington to Bush, New York: HarperCollins Publishing, 1995, 516.
  4. ^ Andrew, Christopher, For the President's Eyes Only, Secret Intelligence and the American Presidency from Washington to Bush, New York: HarperCollins Publishing, 1995, 530.
  5. ^ Pfiffner, James P.; Phythian, Mark (22 September 2017). "Intelligence and National Security Policymaking on Iraq: British and American Perspectives". Texas A&M University Press – via Google Books.
  6. ^ Billigmeier, Scott & Glabus, Ed, From World War II to Desert Storm, Perspectives on Military Intelligence, Officer Review magazine, June 1998, 2-5.

Sources[edit]