Richard Kingsland

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Sir Richard Kingsland
Birth name Julius Cohen
Born (1916-10-19)19 October 1916
Moree, New South Wales
Died 27 August 2012(2012-08-27) (aged 95)
Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
Allegiance  Australia
Service/branch  Royal Australian Air Force
Years of service 1935–1948
Rank Group Captain
Commands held RAAF Base Rathmines
No. 11 Squadron RAAF
Battles/wars

Second World War

Awards Knight Bachelor
Officer of the Order of Australia
Commander of the Order of the British Empire
Distinguished Flying Cross

Sir Richard Kingsland AO, CBE, DFC (19 October 1916 – 27 August 2012) was an Australian RAAF pilot known for being the youngest Australian group captain at age 29. He later became a senior public servant, heading the Departments of the Interior, Repatriation, and Veterans' Affairs.

Biography[edit]

Julius Cohen was born in 1916. He later changed his name to Richard Kingsland, to avoid anti-semitism.

He was sent to Morocco in 1940 to rescue two of Britain's most senior WWII leaders, Duff Cooper and John Vereker, 6th Viscount Gort. Kingsland managed to rescue them from French headquarters with only two other men and managed to flee in a Seaplane.[1]

The same year, Kingsland and his crew were sent to bomb a major Japanese headquarters established in Rabaul, New Guinea.[2]

For his invaluable service, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) in September 1940.[3]

In June 2010 he published his autobiography, Into the Midst of Things.[4]

Public service[edit]

During his public service career, rising to become Secretary of the Departments of Interior, Repatriation, and Veterans' Affairs, Kingsland served 12 ministers and built a reputation as a trusted and experienced departmental head.

Awards and honours[edit]

Richard Kingsland was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 1967.[5]

He was knighted in 1978,[6] and appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia in 1989.[7]

In 2013, a street in the Canberra suburb of Casey was named Kingsland Parade in Richard Kingsland's honour.[8]

Death[edit]

Richard Kingsland died in August 2012, aged 95. He was survived by his wife of 68 years, Kathleen Kingsland, two daughters and a son.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ellery, David (28 August 2012). "Sir Richard Kingsland dies in Canberra". The Canberra Times (Fairfax Media). Archived from the original on 17 January 2014. 
  2. ^ "Boys Own adventures in wartime and sterling public service". The age.com. Retrieved September 1, 2012. 
  3. ^ "It's an Honour - Honours - Search Australian Honours". Itsanhonour.gov.au. 1940-09-13. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  4. ^ "Kingsland's Into the Midst of Things book". Royal Australian Airforce. Retrieved September 1, 2012. 
  5. ^ "It's an Honour - Honours - Search Australian Honours". Itsanhonour.gov.au. 1967-06-19. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  6. ^ "It's an Honour - Honours - Search Australian Honours". Itsanhonour.gov.au. 1978-06-03. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  7. ^ "It's an Honour - Honours - Search Australian Honours". Itsanhonour.gov.au. 1989-06-12. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  8. ^ Kingsland Parade, ACT Government Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate, archived from the original on 27 February 2014 
  9. ^ Farquharson, John (2012), Kingsland, Sir Richard (1916–2012), Australian National University, archived from the original on 17 January 2014 
Government offices
Preceded by
Bill McLaren
Secretary of the Department of the Interior
1963 – 1970
Succeeded by
George Warwick Smith
Preceded by
Frederick Oliver Chilton
Secretary of the Repatriation Department
1970 – 1974
Succeeded by
Himself
as Secretary of the Department of Repatriation and Compensation
Preceded by
Himself
as Secretary of the Repatriation Department
Secretary of the Department of Repatriation and Compensation
1974 – 1975
Succeeded by
Himself
as Secretary of the Department of Repatriation
Preceded by
Himself
as Secretary of the Department of Repatriation and Compensation
Secretary of the Department of Repatriation
1975 – 1976
Succeeded by
Himself
as Secretary of the Department of Veterans' Affairs
Preceded by
Himself
as Secretary of the Department of Repatriation
Secretary of the Department of Veterans' Affairs
1976 – 1981
Succeeded by
Derek Volker