Richard Nanes

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Richard Aberman Nanes (born December 11, 1927 in Philadelphia, died of cancer October 8, 2009) was an American businessman, and amateur composer and pianist.

Business[edit]

Nanes was executive president and co-owner of Nanes Finishing and Assembly Corporation, a Newark, New Jersey company founded by his father in 1956.[1] The company at some point moved into the computer frame industry.[2]

Music[edit]

In the 1970s he became active as a composer. He was sometime composer in residence at Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart.[3]

His works include:

  • Symphony No. 1 in B flat major "Atlantis - The Sunken City"
  • Symphony No. 2 in B Major "The False Benediction"
  • Symphony No. 3 "The Holocaust"
  • Symphony No. 4 "The Eternal Conflict"
  • Numerous piano pieces including a set of 6 nocturnes entitled "Nocturnes of the Celestial Seas"
  • Various concerted works for piano or violin, including a Rhapsody Pathétique for Violin and Orchestra
  • 5 string quartets

The 1st and 2nd Symphonies were recorded by the London Philharmonic Orchestra under Pacific Symphony founder Keith Clark (Conductor) in 1986.[4] Both concerts were filmed and recorded by the Eternal Word Television Network.[5] The full cycle of 4 symphonies was re-recorded by the LPO under Thomas Sanderling and released in 1994.[6] These recordings were all issued by the "Delfon Recording Society". Although the financial relationship between Nanes and Delfon has not been made public, Delfon's entire discography consists of works by Nanes.[7] Delfon issued a digital re-release of Nocturnes in 2003, again with Nanes himself at the piano.[8]

Bernard Holland in the New York Times was harshly critical of Nanes' "extremely simple" piano works,[9] but also described the 1st Symphony as "a busy piece".[10] Jeffrey Quick labelled the symphonies "ugly" and "inept"[11] and Allan Kozinn panned the 3rd as "horrifying".[12]

Age[edit]

Several sources give Nanes' year of birth as 1941. A New York Times article makes him 44 in 1983, which implies a 1938 or 1939 birth. However, his induction into the Hall of Fame at Nutley Library states that he graduated from Nutley High School in 1946,[13] which puts his birth year at 1927 or 1928, consistent with his notes at composers-classical-music.com.

References[edit]