Richard Nesbitt

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Richard William Nesbitt (born October 7, 1955) is a Canadian financial executive. Is currently the president and CEO of Global Risk Institute in Financial Services. In addition he is also an Adjunct Professor at the Rotman School of Management of the University of Toronto where he teaches a course at the Rotman School of Management, entitled "How Banks Work: Management in a New Regulatory Age". Richard is also chair of the Advisory Board of the Mind Brain Behaviour Hive at the same University.

He became CEO of CIBC World Markets on February 29, 2008, replacing former CIBC World Markets head Brian Shaw (Encana Corp).[1][2]

Until his resignation in January 2008, he was the CEO of TSX Group, which operates the Toronto Stock Exchange and the TSX Venture Exchange. He is on the Board of Directors of TSX Group, the World Federation of Exchanges, Market Regulation Services, CanDeal, Frontier College and the Prostate Cancer Research Foundation of Canada. Nesbitt was a governor (member of the board of directors) of the Toronto Stock Exchange from 1996 until December 1999.[3]

In 2014, Richard was awarded the Visionary Award[4] by the organization Women in Capital Markets for work during his career on the issue of sponsoring gender-diverse management teams and boards in order to produce better companies. He also received the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for community service and the Arbor Award from the University of Toronto for his work with the school.

Previously, Richard served as President and Chief Operating Officer of BayStreetDirect Inc., an Internet-based investment dealer. Before that, he was President and Chief Executive Officer of HSBC Securities Canada for three years, after having worked for ten years at CIBC Wood Gundy. He has also worked with Mobil Oil Canada Ltd., for five years and spent two years as a Lecturer at the University of Western Ontario, Richard Ivey School of Business.

He lives in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

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