Pittsburgh Great Race

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Pittsburgh Great Race
City of Pittsburgh Great Race logo.png
Date Last Sunday in September (annually)
Location Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Event type Road
Distance 10k
Established 1977
Official site http://www.rungreatrace.com/

The Richard S. Caliguiri City of Pittsburgh Great Race, known most commonly as the Great Race, is a major 10 kilometer foot race organized and operated annually by the City of Pittsburgh Department of Parks and Recreation (Citiparks) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the United States, named in honor of former Mayor of Pittsburgh Richard S. Caliguiri.[1][2] Established in 1977, the race has been held the last Sunday of September each year except 2003, when the City of Pittsburgh government faced financial difficulty.[3]

Since the revival of the Pittsburgh Marathon in 2009, participation in the Great Race has increased dramatically, meeting registration caps enacted to limit the total number of runners. By 2010, the race was considered the largest 10k race in Pennsylvania and tenth largest in the United States.[4][5] A 5k race immediately precedes the 10k race, which essentially follows the second half of the 10k course. Both races finish at the same location in Point State Park in downtown Pittsburgh. By 2014, nearly 16,000 runners were registered between the 5k and 10k races, and in 2015 the race is capped at 11,000 runners in the 10k course and 5,500 runners in the 5k course for a total of 16,500 entrants.[6][7]

Beginning at the foot of Frick Park, the course of the Great Race leads through some of Pittsburgh's most well-known neighborhoods, including Squirrel Hill, Oakland, The Bluff (Uptown), and Downtown. Runners pass the three largest universities in Pittsburgh during the race, Carnegie Mellon, University of Pittsburgh, and Duquesne. Finishing roughly 400 feet below the start line, except for notable climbs in the first and fifth miles, the course is predominantly downhill, enabling a competitive race.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kelly, Jack (September 29, 2007). "Great Race keeps them coming back for more". Pittsburgh Post Gazette. 
  2. ^ "Richard S. Caligiuri Great Race". City of Pittsburgh Department of Parks and Recreation. Retrieved 26 August 2015. 
  3. ^ Harrop, JoAnne Klimovich (September 29, 2007). "Great Race keeps Radley running". Pittsburgh Tribune Review. 
  4. ^ "Pittsburgh's Great Race: Record numbers a by-product of marathon", Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, retrieved 18 July 2011.
  5. ^ "10 Biggest 10Ks in the US", Running USA. Retrieved 18 July 2011.
  6. ^ Grubba, Matt (28 September 2014). "Duquesne graduate dominates Pittsburgh's Great Race field". Pittsburgh Tribune Review. Pittsburgh. Retrieved 26 August 2015. 
  7. ^ "Register for the Richard S. Caligiuri Great Race". City of Pittsburgh Department of Parks and Recreation. Retrieved 26 August 2015. 
  8. ^ Pittsburgh Great Race Map. From the race's official website, retrieved 18 July 2011

External links[edit]