Richard Shackleton Pope

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Richard Shackleton Pope
Born c. 1793
Died 10 February 1884
Nationality British
Occupation Architect
Practice Pope, Bindon and Clark

Richard Shackleton Pope (c. 1793 – 10 February 1884) was a British architect working mainly in Bristol. His father was a clerk of works for Sir Robert Smirke, and Pope succeeded him, also working for C.R. Cockerell. He moved to Bristol to work on one of Cockerell's projects and decided to settle in the city, where he became District Surveyor from 1831 to 1874, with considerable influence over building works.

List of works[edit]

  • Philosophical Institution, Park Street (1821) for Cockerell, now Freemasons' Hall[1]
  • Royal Colonnade, Great George Street (1828)[2]
  • Magistrates’ Court, Old Council House, Corn Street (1829)[3]
  • Wool Hall, (including the Fleece and Firkin Public House) St. Thomas’ Street (1828–30)[4]
  • Alva House and Dorset House, Litfield Place, Clifton (1829-1830)[5]
  • Cattle market, Temple Meads. Demolished (1830)
  • Ancraman's warehouse, Narrow Quay (1830), later Bush House, now the Arnolfini Gallery
  • Gaol, Cumberland Road. Demolished except for gateway (1831)[6]
  • 49-50 Queen Square (1833)
  • Cathedral (Bristol): chapter house restoration (1833)
  • Vyvyan Terrace, Clifton (1833–47)[7] and Coach House to the rear of Number 16.[8]
  • Brunel House, St George's Road (1837-9), possibly with Isambard Kingdom Brunel
  • Church of St Peter, Oakford, Devon (1838)[9]
  • St Mary on the Quay: planned as an Irvingite church, St Augustine's Parade (1839)[10]
  • Taylor Maxwell House, Clifton (1839)[11]
  • Brunel House (Great Western Steamship Hotel) 1839[12]
  • 39-53 Apsley Road, Clifton (c. 1840)[13]
  • Buxton Villa, Richmond Park Road (1840)[14]
  • Phillip's warehouse, Queen Charlotte Street (1840). Demolished 1972.
  • 2, Richmond Park Road, Clifton (c.1840)[15]
  • Rebuild of St Nicholas Church Winsley (1840)[16]
  • Buckingham Place, Queen's Road, Clifton (1843).[17]
  • Guildhall, Broad Street (1843).[18]
  • Police station, Bridewell Street (1844). Demolished c.1927.
  • Buckingham Baptist Chapel, Clifton (1844-7)[19]
  • 1 and 3, Richmond Park Road, Clifton (1845)[20]
  • 5 and 7, Richmond Park Road, Clifton (1845)[21]
  • 12 and 13, Buckingham Vale, Clifton (c.1845)[22]
  • 1 to 7 Pembroke Mansions, Oakfield Road (1845)[23]
  • Burlington Buildings, Burlington Road, Whiteladies Park (1845).[24]
  • 5 and 7, Oakfield Road, Clifton (c.1845)[25]
  • 9 and 11, Oakfield Road, Clifton (c.1845)[26]
  • Fosters Chambers, Small Street (c.1846)[27]
  • Extension to the Market Chambers, St Nicholas Street (1848-9)[28][29]
  • 3-15 Aberdeen terrace, Cotham (Late 1840s)[30]
  • Clifton Pool and The Victoria Public House (1850)
  • National Westminster Bank, Corn Street (1852-1855)[31]
  • St Philip and Jacob, Bristol (1860)
  • Bristol Bridge: widening (1849). Competition win : executed 1861.
  • Oakfield Road Unitarian Church (closed 1984 now offices)
  • Assize Courts, Small Street (1867)
  • Viaduct, Park Street (1871)[32]
  • Merchant Hall, Clifton Down 1868

From about 1850 until 1869 worked in partnership at Pope, Bindon and Clark.

Then in 1870 went into partnership with his son as Pope and Son and finally Pope and Co.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Freemasons' Hall". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  2. ^ "Royal Colonnade". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  3. ^ "Old Council House". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  4. ^ "Wool Hall". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  5. ^ "Alva House and Dorset House". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  6. ^ "Old City Gaol". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  7. ^ "Terrace and attached front area railings and gates". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  8. ^ "Coach House to the rear of Number 16". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  9. ^ "Church of St Peter". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  10. ^ "The Roman Catholic church of St Mary on the Quay, Bristol,". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  11. ^ "Taylor Maxwell House, Clifton". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  12. ^ "Brunel House, attached front railings and horse bazaar, St Georges Street, Bristol". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  13. ^ "39-53, Apsley Road". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  14. ^ "Buxton Villa". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  15. ^ "2, Richmond Park Road, Clifton". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  16. ^ "St Nicholas Church". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  17. ^ "Numbers 1 to 16 Buckingham Place". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  18. ^ "Guildhall". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  19. ^ "Buckingham Baptist Chapel". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  20. ^ "1 and 3, Richmond Park Road, Clifton". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  21. ^ "5 and 7, Richmond Park Road, Clifton". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  22. ^ "12 and 13, Buckingham Vale, Clifton". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  23. ^ "1 to 7 Pembroke Mansions, Oakfield Road". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  24. ^ "Nos.11-31, Burlington Buildings". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  25. ^ "5 and 7, Oakfield Road, Clifton". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  26. ^ "9 and 11, Oakfield Road, Clifton". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  27. ^ "Fosters Chambers". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  28. ^ "The Market". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  29. ^ "Market Chambers". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  30. ^ "3-15 Aberdeen terrace, Cotham". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  31. ^ "National Westminster Bank". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015. 
  32. ^ "Park Street Viaduct". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 22 November 2015.