Rida Cabanilla

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Rida Cabanilla[1]
Member of the Hawaii House of Representatives
from the 41st district
Assumed office
January 16, 2013
Preceded byTy Cullen
Member of the Hawaii House of Representatives
from the 42nd district
In office
January 2005 – January 16, 2013
Preceded byTulsi Gabbard
Succeeded bySharon Har
Personal details
Born (1952-12-24) December 24, 1952 (age 66)
Ilocos Sur, Philippines
NationalityAmerican
Political partyDemocratic
Alma materUniversity of Hawaii
United States Army Command and General Staff College
Military service
Branch/serviceUnited States Army Reserve
RankLieutenant colonel

Rida T.R. Cabanilla Arakawa[2] (born December 24, 1952 in Ilocos Sur, Philippines) is an American politician and a Democratic member of the Hawaii House of Representatives since January 16, 2013 representing District 41. Cabanilla consecutively served from January 2005 until 2013 in the District 42 seat.

Education[edit]

Cabanilla earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Hawaii and attended the United States Army Command and General Staff College.

Elections[edit]

  • 2012 Redistricted to District 41, and with Democratic Representative Ty Cullen redistricted to District 39, Cabanilla won the August 11, 2012 Democratic Primary with 1,895 votes,[3] and won the November 6, 2012 General election with 4,330 votes (57.7%) against Republican nominee Adam Reeder.[4]
  • 2002 When Republican Representative Mark Moses was redistricted to District 40, Cabanilla sought the open District 42 seat in the four-way September 21, 2002 Democratic Primary, but took second to Tulsi Gabbard,[5] who won the November 5, 2002 General election.[6]
  • 2004 Cabanilla won the four-way September 18, 2004 Democratic Primary with 1,463 votes (58.0%) against incumbent Representative Gabbard and two other candidates;[7] Gabbard would go on to represent Hawaii's 2nd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives in 2013. Cabanilla won the November 2, 2004 General election with 4,148 votes (73.1%) against Republican nominee Trevor Koch,[8] who had sought a seat in 2002.
  • 2006 Cabanilla was unopposed for the September 26, 2006 Democratic Primary, winning with 1,979 votes,[9] and won the November 7, 2006 General election with 2,757 votes (66.7%) against Republican nominee Norm Robert.[10]
  • 2008 Cabanilla won the three-way September 20, 2008 Democratic Primary with 1,111 votes (47.2%),[11] and won the November 4, 2008 General election with 2,788 votes (48.9%) against Republican nominee Tom Berg.[12]
  • 2010 Cabanilla won the September 18, 2010 Democratic Primary with 1,535 votes (50.3%),[13] and Berg was unopposed for the Republican Primary, setting up a rematch; Cabanilla won the November 2, 2010 General election with 2,790 votes (54.3%) against Berg.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Representative Rida T.R. Cabanilla". Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii State Legislature. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  2. ^ "Rida Cabanilla Arakawa's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  3. ^ "Primary Election 2012 - State of Hawaii - Statewide August 11, 2012" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 4. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  4. ^ "Hawaii General 2012 - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 6, 2012" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 2. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  5. ^ "Open Primary Election 2002 - State of Hawaii - Statewide September 21, 2002" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 5. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  6. ^ "General Election 2002 - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 5, 2002" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 2. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  7. ^ "Open Primary 2004 - State of Hawaii - Statewide September 18, 2004" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 4. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  8. ^ "General Election 2004 - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 2, 2004" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 2. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  9. ^ "Primary Election 2006 - State of Hawaii - Statewide September 26, 2006" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 4. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  10. ^ "General Election 2006 - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 7, 2006" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 2. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  11. ^ "Primary Election 2008 - State of Hawaii - Statewide September 20, 2008" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 3. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  12. ^ "General Election - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 4, 2008" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 2. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  13. ^ "Primary Election 2010 - State of Hawaii - Statewide September 18, 2010" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 5. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  14. ^ "General Election - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 2, 2010" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 2. Retrieved December 3, 2013.

External links[edit]