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Rideau Cottage

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Rideau Cottage
Rideau Cottage.png
Rideau Cottage in 1892
General information
Architectural style Georgian Revival
Address 1 Sussex Drive
(on grounds of Rideau Hall)
Town or city Ottawa, Ontario
Country Canada
Coordinates 45°26′37″N 75°40′58″W / 45.443692°N 75.682738°W / 45.443692; -75.682738
Current tenants Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada, and his family
Construction started 1866
Completed 1867
Cost $5,000 (1867)[1]
Owner The Queen in Right of Canada
Landlord National Capital Commission
Technical details
Size 932 square metres (10,030 sq ft)[2]
Other information
Number of rooms 22
Location of Rideau Cottage on the grounds of Rideau Hall

Rideau Cottage is a historic residential building located on the grounds of Rideau Hall in Ottawa, Ontario. The two-level, 22-room Georgian Revival home is owned by the Canadian Crown and has traditionally been inhabited by persons associated with the Governor General of Canada, including the viceroy's private secretary. It is occupied by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his family as of 2016.

History[edit]

Construction on the building, which was based on a design by architect F.P. Rubidge, began in 1866 and concluded in 1867.[3][4] Though intended in the early days to serve as the residence of the governor general's secretary, the cottage was later designated for use by the government as an official guest house for visiting dignitaries.[5]

On his arrival in Canada in 1883, incoming governor general the Marquess of Lansdowne resided at Rideau Cottage while waiting for Rideau Hall to be vacated by the outgoing Governor General, the Marquess of Lorne.[6] Other residents included: Lionel and Lilias Massey during Vincent Massey's time as governor general;[7] Georges Vanier, as Aide-de-camp to Governor General the Viscount Byng of Vimy; and Barbara Uteck, private secretary to the Governor General from 2000 to 2006, and her husband, Graham Fraser. Uteck's successor, Stephen Wallace, resided in Rideau Cottage until the weekend of 24–25 October 2015,[8] when he vacated the premises to allow then prime minister-designate Justin Trudeau and his family to live in the house while the traditional official residence of the Prime Minister of Canada, 24 Sussex Drive, was undergoing assessment for repairs and restoration.[9]

Rideau Cottage was recognized as a Recognized Federal Heritage Building on 3 October 1986.[3]

Design[edit]

Rideau Cottage is a two-level, 22-room Georgian Revival building. Originally, the structure had 14 rooms on a single floor. An 1872 remodel, using a different brick, added both the second level and a verandah on three sides of the ground floor.[3] During that remodel, the exterior brick of the first floor was covered in stucco painted to appear like brick. (When the verandah was removed some time later, the stucco remained.)[10] Between 1999 and 2000, the building underwent major renovations to the basement, roof and interior finishes, and the mechanical and electrical systems were upgraded. Outside, the stucco was removed and each brick and joint was individually dyed to give a uniform appearance.[10] It was again renovated in 2013.[2]

Rideau Cottage is characterized and distinguished by its symmetry, simple lines, classically inspired central entrance with pedimented porch, sash windows flanked by decorative shutters, and paired chimneys.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Butler, Don (26 October 2015). "Trudeau family moving to Rideau Cottage pending decision on 24 Sussex". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 26 October 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "Justin Trudeau will move into Rideau Cottage, not 24 Sussex". CBC. 26 October 2015. Retrieved 26 October 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d Rideau Cottage. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 October 2015.
  4. ^ Rideau Cottage: FHBRO 86-02 (PDF), Canada's Historic Places, archived from the original (PDF) on 6 November 2015, retrieved 8 November 2015 
  5. ^ Colombo, John (2011). Fascinating Canada: A Book of Questions and Answers. Toronto: Dundurn Press. p. 35. ISBN 1-55488-923-5. 
  6. ^ Buchan, John (2010). Lord Minto, A Memoir. Oxford City Press. p. 178. ASIN B003KQ4Z20. 
  7. ^ "Mrs. Lionel Massey Leads Busy Social Life". Ottawa Citizen. 14 May 1954. 
  8. ^ The Canadian Press (26 October 2015). "From Rideau Cottage To 24 Sussex, Ottawa's Official Residences Have Long History". Huffington Post. Retrieved 10 November 2015. 
  9. ^ Butler, Don (26 October 2015). "Trudeaus to call 22-room Rideau Cottage home while deciding on whether to move into 24 Sussex". National Post. Retrieved 26 October 2015. 
  10. ^ a b "Restoration work at Rideau Hall, the Official Residence of the Governor General of Canada". François LeBlanc. Retrieved 10 November 2015.