Rift sawing

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The Architectural Woodworkers Institute defines "rift sawing" as a technique of cutting boards from logs radially so the annular growth ring orientation is between 30 - 60 degrees to the face of the board, with 45 degrees being "optimum".[1]

AWI Lumber Cuts.svg

AWI defines quartersawn lumber as having annual growth ring orientation between 60 - 90 degrees relative to the face of the board.[2]

Flat-sawing produces the least wood waste and fastest sawing, but produces boards which are more susceptible to cupping and shrinkage, and which have a distinctive grain which may be aesthetically undesirable for some uses. Quarter sawing produces smaller boards than flat sawing, but has a straighter grain, which in addition to being visually pleasing, makes the lumber more stable.

This rift grain lumber is also referred to as "bastard grain" from Hoadley.[3]

Hoadley also tries denote rift grain and quarter grain as interchangeable definitions,[4] but they are not according to the AWS,[5] so confusion of the terminology is understandable.

See also[edit]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvUPJPFg4wM

References[edit]

  1. ^ page 449, Appendix B, section 3 Lumber of the 2009 1st edition of Architectural Woodwork Standards
  2. ^ page 449, Appendix B, section 3 Lumber of the 2009 1st edition of Architectural Woodwork Standards
  3. ^ page 14, chapter 1, Understanding Wood: A Craftsman's Guide to Wood Technology
  4. ^ page 14, chapter 1, Understanding Wood: A Craftsman's Guide to Wood Technology
  5. ^ page 449, Appendix B, section 3 Lumber of the 2009 1st edition of Architectural Woodwork Standards