Rima Horton

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Rima Horton
BornRima Elizabeth Horton
(1947-01-31) 31 January 1947 (age 71)
Bayswater, London, England
OccupationFormer Labour Party councillor (1986–2006)
Former economics lecturer
Spouse(s)
Alan Rickman
(m. 2012; died 2016)

Rima Elizabeth Horton (born 31 January 1947)[1] is an English former Labour Party councillor on the Kensington and Chelsea London Borough Council, winning election in 1986. She twice ran as a Labour candidate for Parliament but lost both times. Horton has also worked as a lecturer at Kingston University.

Horton was the longtime partner of actor Alan Rickman. Together since 1965, they were married in a private ceremony in 2012, and remained so until his death in 2016.

Early life[edit]

Rima Elizabeth Horton was born into a working-class family in Bayswater, the third of four children of Elice Irene (née Frame, 1906–1984) and Wilfred Stewart Horton (1905–2003).[2] Her mother was from Wales while her father was London-born.[3] Horton attended the all-girls St. Vincent de Paul primary school,[4] and later the University of Southampton.[1]

Career[edit]

Horton won election as a Labour Party councillor on the Kensington and Chelsea London Borough Council in 1986,[4] serving as its Chief Whip and a spokesperson on education during her tenure.[1] She lost her place on the council in May 2006, "part of the national shift". She twice ran as a Labour candidate for Parliament, losing to the Tory candidate each time.[4] Horton also has worked as a senior economics lecturer at Kingston University in London.[1][4]

Horton served on the board of directors of The Making Place, a children's charity. She was appointed in 2002 and stepped down in 2005.[5] She also has served on the board of trustees of the Gate Theatre in Notting Hill.[6]

Writing[edit]

Horton was a contributor to The Elgar Companion to Radical Political Economy in 1994, penning a piece titled "Inequality". In it, she posed three questions: whether people are "naturally equal in essence"; whether and when the redistribution of wealth is justified; and, if so, how much is "fair"? She cited "much recent work" suggesting that health status and mortality rates in developed countries "actually depends on the distribution of income".[7]

Personal life[edit]

Horton met aspiring actor Alan Rickman when she was 18 and he was 19, while attending Chelsea College of Arts. The couple were married in a private ceremony in New York City in 2012. Horton lived with Rickman from 1977 until his death in January 2016.[8] The couple had no children.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Wood 1992, p. 76.
  2. ^ England & Wales, Death Index, 1916-2007. General Register Office.
       England and Wales Civil Registration Indexes. London, England: General Register Office. Vol. 12. p. 1804. Print.
  3. ^ Birth Certificate for Rima E. Horton. 31 January 1947. File No. 7221822-1. London, England: General Register Office.
       England & Wales births 1837-2006. Vol. 5D, p. 406. Print.
       England & Wales, FreeBMD Birth Index, 1837-1915. Vol. 2A, p. 337. Print.
  4. ^ a b c d Owoseje, Toyin (14 January 2016). "Who is Rima Horton, the childhood sweetheart Alan Rickman married shortly before his death?". International Business Times. Retrieved 19 January 2016.
       McGlone, Jackie (31 July 2006). "A man for all seasons". The Scotsman. Edinburgh. Retrieved 15 January 2016.
  5. ^ "Ms Rima Elizabeth Horton". Companies In the UK. Retrieved 21 January 2016.
  6. ^ Cabal 2005, p. 3.
  7. ^ Elgar 1994, pp. 203–207.
  8. ^ Chiu, Melody (23 April 2015). "Alan Rickman and Longtime Love Rima Horton Secretly Wed 3 Years Ago". People. Retrieved 14 January 2016.

Sources[edit]

  • Cabal, Fermín (2005). Tejas Verdes: Gate Theatre Presents. Oberon Books. ISBN 1840025379. Cited as Cabal 2005.
  • Horton, Rima (1994). Arestis, Philip; Sawyer, Malcolm C., eds. The Elgar Companion to Radical Political Economy. Edward Elgar Publishing. ISBN 184376864X. Cited as Elgar 1994.
  • Wood, Alan H.; Wood, Roger, eds. (1992). Guide to the House of Commons, April 1992. Times Newspapers Ltd. Cited as Wood 1992.