Ringgold-Carroll House

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Ringgold-Carroll House
Ringgold.jpg
Ringgold-Carroll House
Ringgold-Carroll House is located in Central Washington, D.C.
Ringgold-Carroll House
Ringgold-Carroll House is located in the District of Columbia
Ringgold-Carroll House
Ringgold-Carroll House is located in the US
Ringgold-Carroll House
Location 1801 F St NW, Washington, D.C.
Coordinates 38°53′51″N 77°2′30.9″W / 38.89750°N 77.041917°W / 38.89750; -77.041917Coordinates: 38°53′51″N 77°2′30.9″W / 38.89750°N 77.041917°W / 38.89750; -77.041917
Built 1825
Architectural style Federal
NRHP Reference # 73002114
Added to NRHP July 26, 1973[1]

The Ringgold-Carroll House (also known as the DACOR Bacon House and John Marshall House) is an historic residence located at 1801 F St Northwest, Washington, D.C. Built in 1825, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It has been adapted as office space by the Diplomatic and Consular Officers Retired (DACOR) organization.

History[edit]

It was built in 1825 for Tench Ringgold, who was one of a three-member presidential commission charged with supervising the restoration of public buildings in the capital following the War of 1812 and burning by the British. He was also still serving as US Marshal in the District of Columbia, having first been appointed under the President James Monroe administration.

From 1832-1833, Chief Justice John Marshall of the United States Supreme Court resided as a boarder with Ringgold in the house.[2] Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story also boarded there, and both men considered Ringgold a friend.

In 1835, the house was sold, and a number of prominent people have since lived in the house, including William Thomas Carroll, a clerk at the Supreme Court, for whom the house is also named; Chief Justice Melville Fuller, Senator Joseph Medill McCormick, and Congressman Robert Low Bacon. The Diplomatic and Consular Officers Retired (DACOR) organization now uses the house as office space, and a number of other organizations rent office space in the building as well. The historic property is open to the public only on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 2:30 - 4:30 p.m. as the "Ringgold Museum".[2][3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b Hogarth, Paul (1985). Walking Tours of Old Washington and Alexandria. EPM Publications. p. 17. 
  3. ^ "Historic DACOR Bacon House". Diplomatic and Consular Officers, Retired. Retrieved 2009-02-01. [dead link]

External links[edit]