Rippey, Iowa

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Rippey, Iowa
City
Location of Rippey, Iowa
Location of Rippey, Iowa
Coordinates: 41°56′2″N 94°12′4″W / 41.93389°N 94.20111°W / 41.93389; -94.20111Coordinates: 41°56′2″N 94°12′4″W / 41.93389°N 94.20111°W / 41.93389; -94.20111
Country  United States
State  Iowa
County Greene
Area[1]
 • Total 0.84 sq mi (2.18 km2)
 • Land 0.84 sq mi (2.18 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,073 ft (327 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 292
 • Estimate (2016)[3] 285
 • Density 348/sq mi (134.2/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 50235
Area code(s) 515
FIPS code 19-67215
GNIS feature ID 0460642

Rippey is a city in Greene County, Iowa, United States. The population was 292 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

Rippey is located at 41°56′2″N 94°12′4″W / 41.93389°N 94.20111°W / 41.93389; -94.20111 (41.933800, -94.201189).[4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.84 square miles (2.18 km2), all of it land.[1]

History[edit]

Rippey had its start in the year 1870 by the building of the Des Moines Valley Railroad through that territory.[5]

In the late 19th century, Rippey and Angus, 4 miles to the south east, were the centers of coal mining in Greene County. The Keystone Coal Company opened three mines in Angus between 1878 and 1887; the last of these was worked out by 1887. Between 1882 and 1887, the Standard Mine also operated in the region.[6] Keystone opened new mines south of Rippey into the 20th century, where they were joined by the Snake Creek Coal company and the Buckeye coal company. One mine, with a 125-foot shaft, was located a short distance from the Rippey railroad station.[7]

Demographics[edit]

Historical populations
Year Pop. ±%
1900 395 —    
1910 407 +3.0%
1920 409 +0.5%
1930 357 −12.7%
1940 421 +17.9%
1950 354 −15.9%
1960 331 −6.5%
1970 270 −18.4%
1980 304 +12.6%
1990 275 −9.5%
2000 319 +16.0%
2010 292 −8.5%
2016 285 −2.4%
Source:"American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau.  and Iowa Data Center
Source:
U.S. Decennial Census[8]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 292 people, 116 households, and 70 families residing in the city. The population density was 347.6 inhabitants per square mile (134.2/km2). There were 129 housing units at an average density of 153.6 per square mile (59.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.9% White and 2.1% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.8% of the population.

There were 116 households of which 31.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.1% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 39.7% were non-families. 27.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.11.

The median age in the city was 38 years. 27.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.4% were from 25 to 44; 25.4% were from 45 to 64; and 14.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 51.7% male and 48.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 319 people, 125 households, and 91 families residing in the city. The population density was 378.7 people per square mile (146.6/km²). There were 138 housing units at an average density of 163.8 per square mile (63.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.55% White, 0.31% African American, 0.94% from other races, and 2.19% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.08% of the population.

There were 125 households out of which 38.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.6% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.2% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the city, the population was spread out with 31.0% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 27.0% from 25 to 44, 19.4% from 45 to 64, and 16.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 114.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $33,611, and the median income for a family was $42,656. Males had a median income of $25,833 versus $24,531 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,344. About 3.4% of families and 6.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.6% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.

Windfarm[edit]

Located near Rippey, Iowa, a 50 Megawatt (MW) windfarm was constructed in 2012. The Rippey windfarm is owned by RPM Access and consists of 20 Nordex 2.5 MW turbines mounted on 100 meters (330 feet) tall towers. Central Iowa Power Cooperative is purchasing the power generated by the project under a long-term power purchase agreement and is distributing the power to its member Cooperatives.[10]

BRR - Bicycle Ride to Rippey[edit]

Annually since 1977 on the first Saturday in February, the Bicycle Ride to Rippey, known as BRR, occurs. BRR was founded by Dennis Hurley along with Jim Walstrom who both wanted to get a ski trip going but instead put together the Coldest Day of the Year Bike Ride.[11][12] The first year, BRR had 22 riders who made it to warm up at Larry Vodenik's Rippey Tap and, the next year, only 12 rode.[11][12] In 2016, 500 pre registered with over 1700 bicyclists riding the route and, in 2017, 650 pre registered with more than 2000 riders participating on the day of BRR.[11][12] Starting in Perry and ending in Perry (map of the route), this 24-mile (39 km) often frozen fun ride is the beginning of RAGBRAI season. The Perry Lions Club hosts a breakfast starting at 7am and packet pickup begins at 7:30am in Hotel Pattee, 1112 Willis Ave. At 10am, the bicycle riders depart for Rippey from one block east of Highway 144 at the intersection of Second Street and Willis near Hotel Pattee. The participants are encouraged to leave Rippey by 3pm. The route support ends at 7pm. In 2017, the cost to support the event with advance purchase through Eventbrite is $17 without merchandise or $25 with merchandise or $33 with merchandise and a breakfast. $35 on the day of the event gets you a BRR 2017 shirt, hot chocolate, SAG services, admission to the Rec Center and other local discounts. The Perry Chamber of Commerce sponsors the activity, but the highlight of the ride is the warm welcome always given to the riders by the town of Rippey.[13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  3. ^ Cite error: The named reference USCensusEst2016 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ Stillman, Edwin B. (1907). Past and Present of Greene County, Iowa. Brookhaven Press. p. 188. 
  6. ^ James H. Lees, History of Coal Mining in Iowa, Chapter III of Annual Report, 1908, Iowa Geological Survey, 1909, page 580.
  7. ^ Henry Hinds, The Coal Deposits of Iowa, Annual Report, 1908, Iowa Geological Survey, 1909, pages 359-360
  8. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  10. ^ "RPM Access - Company Profile". RPM Access Website. Retrieved 21 February 2013. 
  11. ^ a b c Cole, Clint (February 10, 2017). "BRR celecbrates 40th Anniversary". Perry Chief. Perry, Iowa. Retrieved February 23, 2017. 
  12. ^ a b c Caufield, Jim (February 8, 2017). "Volunteer labor abounds behind the scenes of BRR". The Perry News. Perry, Iowa. Retrieved February 23, 2017. 
  13. ^ "2017 BRR registration form with a map of the route (pdf)" (PDF). Retrieved February 1, 2017. 
  14. ^ "2017 BRR - Bike Ride to Rippey online entry form". Retrieved February 1, 2017. 
  15. ^ "Perry Chamber of Commerce Hosts 39th Annual BRR- Bike Ride to Rippey". Iowa Living Magazines. January 7, 2016. Retrieved January 23, 2016. 
  16. ^ Ivankovich, Stephanie (January 7, 2016). "BRR ride returns". The Perry Chief. Perry, Iowa. Retrieved January 23, 2016. 
  17. ^ Caufield, Jim (January 25, 2017). "Boosters peddle BRR, Let’s Connect at annual Iowa Bike Expo Saturday". The Perry News. Perry, Iowa. Retrieved February 1, 2017. 
  18. ^ Caufield, Jim (January 9, 2016). "After two decades, BRR Bike Ride to Rippey still shivering onward". The Perry News. Perry, Iowa. Retrieved January 20, 2016. 
  19. ^ Siepker, Scott (January 6, 2012). "BRR Bike Ride, Perry, Iowa". Iowa Outdoors (#201) on the IPTV network. Retrieved January 20, 2016. 
  20. ^ "BRR". perryia.org. Retrieved February 1, 2017. 
  21. ^ Webster, Jeff (February 4, 2017). "What cold? Enthusiastic throng sets off on 40th BRR". The Perry News. Perry, Iowa. Retrieved February 23, 2017. 

External links[edit]