Ritz Crackers

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Ritz Crackers
Brand
Industry Food
Founded 1934; 84 years ago (1934)
Headquarters East Hanover, New Jersey, U.S.
Parent Leo Corp (Mondelēz International)
Website ritzcrackers.com

Ritz Crackers are a brand of snack cracker introduced by Nabisco in 1934. Outside the United States, the Ritz Cracker brand is made by a subsidiary of Mondelēz International.[1] They are circular, salted lightly on one side, and have a small scalloped edge. A single serving (about 5 crackers) contains 79 calories, 1 gram of protein and 4 grams of fat, or 70 calories and 2.5 grams of fat for the whole-wheat variety.

History[edit]

Nabisco introduced the Ritz Cracker in 1934. Looking to compete with a similar cracker made by their competitor, Sunshine Biscuits, they tasked an employee, Sydney Stern, to create a name and advertising plan. Inspired by a hat, Stern created the name Ritz, which appealed to individuals suffering in the Great Depression, offering them "a bite of the good life". He also created the blue circle/yellow lettering logo design.[2] In 2011, Ritz was listed as the "best perceived snack brand" among American consumers in a YouGov poll.[3]

United States[edit]

Boxes of Ritz Crackers

Ritz Crackers varieties are: Original Ritz, Low Sodium Ritz, Reduced Fat Ritz, Whole Wheat Ritz, Honey Wheat Ritz, Roasted Vegetable Ritz, Bacon Ritz, Garlic Butter Ritz, Honey Butter Ritz, Hint of Salt Ritz, and Ritz Fresh Stacks.[4]

United Kingdom[edit]

Ritz Crackers are available in the United Kingdom in three varieties. Original and Cheese flavor are sold in 200-g boxes, and Ritz Cheese Sandwich (a cheesy filling sandwiched between two Ritz Crackers) is available in 125-g roll packs and 33-g snack packs.

Ritz Crackers are also available as the dippers for Dairylea Dunkers and Philadelphia Snack.

Ritz Crackers are also available as part of a confectionery product made by Cadbury with the Crackers forming a sandwich either side of Cadbury Dairy Milk.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bowers, Simon (July 11, 2006). "Shake-up in ownership of food brands". The Guardian. London. Retrieved May 22, 2010. 
  2. ^ Alioto, Daisy (August 10, 2016) How the Ritz Cracker Got Its Name Food & Wine Magazine. Retrieved 2017-06-13.
  3. ^ Willett, Megan (September 24, 2012) The Most Popular Snack Food In America. Business Insider. Retrieved 2017-06-13.
  4. ^ Ritz Products, from the official site

External links[edit]