Riverside Township, New Jersey

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Riverside Township, New Jersey
Township of Riverside
Riverside Station on the River Line
Riverside Station on the River Line
Riverside Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Riverside Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Riverside Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Riverside Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°02′08″N 74°57′21″W / 40.035677°N 74.955801°W / 40.035677; -74.955801Coordinates: 40°02′08″N 74°57′21″W / 40.035677°N 74.955801°W / 40.035677; -74.955801[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyBurlington
IncorporatedFebruary 20, 1895
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorLorraine M. Hatcher (D, term ends December 31, 2018)[3][4]
 • AdministratorMeghan Jack[3]
 • Municipal clerkSusan Dydek[5]
Area
 • Total1.614 sq mi (4.180 km2)
 • Land1.489 sq mi (3.856 km2)
 • Water0.125 sq mi (0.323 km2)  7.73%
Area rank439th of 566 in state
34th of 40 in county[1]
Elevation20 ft (6 m)
Population
 • Total8,079
 • Estimate 
(2016)[11]
7,921
 • Rank285th of 566 in state
20th of 40 in county[12]
 • Density5,425.9/sq mi (2,095.0/km2)
 • Density rank100th of 566 in state
1st of 40 in county[12]
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP code
Area code(s)856 exchanges: 461, 764, 824[15]
FIPS code3400563510[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID0882098[1][18]
Websitewww.riversidetwp.org

Riverside Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 8,079,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 168 (+2.1%) from the 7,911 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 63 (-0.8%) from the 7,974 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Riverside was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 20, 1895, from portions of Delran Township.[20] A portion of the township was annexed by Delran in 1901.[21] The township was named for its location on the Delaware River.[22]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 1.614 square miles (4.180 km2), including 1.489 square miles (3.856 km2) of land and 0.125 square miles (0.323 km2) of water (7.73%).[1][2]

The township borders Delanco Township and Delran Township.[23]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880777
18901,34072.5%
19002,58192.6%
19104,01155.4%
19206,01850.0%
19307,06117.3%
19407,0720.2%
19507,1991.8%
19608,47417.7%
19708,5911.4%
19807,941−7.6%
19907,9740.4%
20007,911−0.8%
20108,0792.1%
Est. 20167,921[11][24]−2.0%
Population sources: 1880-1890[25]
1900-2000[26] 1900-1920[27]
1900-1910[28] 1910-1930[29]
1930-1990[30] 2000[31][32] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,079 people, 2,959 households, and 2,027 families residing in the township. The population density was 5,425.9 per square mile (2,095.0/km2). There were 3,147 housing units at an average density of 2,113.5 per square mile (816.0/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 80.21% (6,480) White, 6.39% (516) Black or African American, 0.26% (21) Native American, 0.95% (77) Asian, 0.05% (4) Pacific Islander, 7.04% (569) from other races, and 5.10% (412) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.34% (916) of the population.[8]

There were 2,959 households out of which 31.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.2% were married couples living together, 14.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.5% were non-families. 24.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.22.[8]

In the township, the population was spread out with 23.1% under the age of 18, 9.9% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 27.0% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.3 years. For every 100 females there were 101.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 99.6 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $56,377 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,391) and the median family income was $65,825 (+/- $9,709). Males had a median income of $46,962 (+/- $4,387) versus $32,413 (+/- $6,739) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,243 (+/- $2,264). About 3.9% of families and 8.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.4% of those under age 18 and 2.3% of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 7,911 people, 2,978 households, and 1,992 families residing in the township. The population density was 5,197.2 people per square mile (2,009.5/km²). There were 3,118 housing units at an average density of 2,048.4 per square mile (792.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 90.22% White, 4.44% African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 2.28% from other races, and 2.50% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.11% of the population.[31][32]

There were 2,978 households out of which 32.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.4% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.1% were non-families. 27.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.21.[31][32]

In the township the population was spread out with 25.0% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 33.4% from 25 to 44, 19.4% from 45 to 64, and 13.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.2 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the township was $43,358, and the median income for a family was $52,479. Males had a median income of $36,556 versus $25,510 for females. The per capita income for the township was $18,758. About 6.7% of families and 8.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.4% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Riverside Township is governed under the Township form of government. The five-member Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6][34] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2018, members of the Riverside Township Committee are Mayor Lorraine M. Hatcher (D, term on committee and as mayor ends December 31, 2018), Deputy Mayor Jason M. Frey (D, 2018; elected to serve an unexpired term), F. Michael Hart (R, 2019; appointed to serve an unexpired term), Corey S. Kimble (D, 2020) and Michael D. Miller (D, 2020) .[3][35][36][37][38][39]

In January 2018, Republican F. Michael Hart was selected by the Township Committee from a list of three candidates nominated by the Republican municipal committee to fill the seat expiring in December 2019 that was vacated by Robert R. Prisco after he resigned to accept a Judicial appointment to a New Jersey Workers' Compensation Judgeship; Hart will serve on an interim basis until the November 2018 general election, when voters will select a candidate to serve the balance of the term of office.[40]

In July 2016, Jason Frey was selected by the Township Committee to fill the seat expiring in December 2018 that was vacated by Timothy LeConey when he announced that he was resigning and moving out of the township.[41] Frey served on an interim basis until the November 2016 general election, when he was elected to serve the balance of the term of office.[38]

On Election Day, November 7, 2006, Mayor Chuck Hilton and fellow Republican incumbent James Ott were defeated by their Democratic opponents, newcomers Lorraine Hatcher and Thomas Polino. An anti-immigration ordinance passed by the Township Committee that imposed fines on any business that hires or any landlord who rents to an illegal immigrant was a major issue in the campaign.[42]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Riverside is located in the 3rd Congressional District[43] and is part of New Jersey's 7th state legislative district.[9][44][45]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Tom MacArthur (R, Toms River).[46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[47] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, 2019).[48][49]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 7th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Troy Singleton (D, Palmyra) and in the General Assembly by Herb Conaway (D, Moorestown) and Carol A. Murphy (D, Mount Laurel).[50][51] The Governor of New Jersey is Phil Murphy (D, Middletown Township).[52] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Sheila Oliver (D, East Orange).[53]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year; at an annual reorganization meeting, the board selects a director and deputy director from among its members.[54] As of 2018, Burlington County's Freeholders are Director Kate Gibbs (R, Lumberton Township, term as freeholder and as director ends December 31, 2018),[55] Deputy Director Linda Hughes (R, Evesham Township, term as freeholder and as deputy director ends 2018)[56] Tom Pullion (D, Edgewater Park, 2020),[57] Balvir Singh (D, Burlington Township, 2020),[58] and Latham Tiver (R, Southampton Township, 2019).[59][54][60][61] Burlington County's Constitutional Officers are County Clerk Tim Tyler (R, Fieldsboro, 2018),[62][63] Sheriff Jean E. Stanfield (R, Westampton, 2019)[64][65] and Surrogate Mary Ann O'Brien (R, Medford, 2021).[66][67][61]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,189 registered voters in Riverside Township, of which 1,527 (36.5% vs. 33.3% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 685 (16.4% vs. 23.9%) were registered as Republicans and 1,974 (47.1% vs. 42.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[68] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 51.9% (vs. 61.7% in Burlington County) were registered to vote, including 67.4% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.3% countywide).[68][69]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,816 votes here (61.7% vs. 58.1% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 1,073 votes (36.5% vs. 40.2%) and other candidates with 31 votes (1.1% vs. 1.0%), among the 2,941 ballots cast by the township's 4,329 registered voters, for a turnout of 67.9% (vs. 74.5% in Burlington County).[70][71] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,881 votes here (58.9% vs. 58.4% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 1,233 votes (38.6% vs. 39.9%) and other candidates with 42 votes (1.3% vs. 1.0%), among the 3,191 ballots cast by the township's 4,278 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.6% (vs. 80.0% in Burlington County).[72] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 1,726 votes here (56.7% vs. 52.9% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 1,278 votes (42.0% vs. 46.0%) and other candidates with 24 votes (0.8% vs. 0.8%), among the 3,044 ballots cast by the township's 4,197 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.5% (vs. 78.8% in the whole county).[73]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,018 votes here (59.4% vs. 61.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 634 votes (37.0% vs. 35.8%) and other candidates with 18 votes (1.1% vs. 1.2%), among the 1,714 ballots cast by the township's 4,254 registered voters, yielding a 40.3% turnout (vs. 44.5% in the county).[74][75] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 854 ballots cast (46.4% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 821 votes (44.6% vs. 47.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 104 votes (5.7% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 28 votes (1.5% vs. 1.2%), among the 1,840 ballots cast by the township's 4,324 registered voters, yielding a 42.6% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[76]

Education[edit]

The Riverside School District serves public school students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its three schools had an enrollment of 1,355 students and 116.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.7:1.[77] Schools in the district (with 2014-15 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[78]) are Riverside Township Elementary School[79] for grades PreK-5 (678 students), Riverside Township Middle School[80] for grades 6-8 (273 students) and Riverside Township High School[81] for grades 9-12 (436 students).[82][83]

Students from Delanco Township attend Riverside High School as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Delanco Township School District.[84][85][86]

Students from Riverside Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[87]

Transportation[edit]

CR 543, the most significant highway in Riverside

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 27.39 miles (44.08 km) of roadways, of which 24.14 miles (38.85 km) were maintained by the municipality and 3.25 miles (5.23 km) by Burlington County.[88]

Public transportation[edit]

The Riverside station, located on Zubrugg Way (formerly Franklin Street),[89] provides service on the River Line light rail system, offering southbound service to Camden and the Walter Rand Transportation Center with connections to PATCO Speedline trains to Philadelphia and the Camden County suburbs and northbound service to the Trenton Rail Station with connections to NJ Transit trains to New York City, SEPTA trains to Philadelphia and Amtrak trains.[90]

NJ Transit provides bus service in the borough on the 419 route that runs between Camden and Burlington.[91][92]

In film[edit]

Riverside was used for the filming of the film Jesus' Son and was the site of picketing by nuns who objected to the implication from the film's title that Jesus fathered a child.[93][94]

Immigration debate[edit]

In July 2006, a controversial ordinance was passed by the township committee trying to handle the large amount of unauthorized immigrants, primarily from Brazil, that had moved into the township. The ordinance stated that employers who hired an illegal immigrant and landlords who rented to them would be fined $1,000 - $2,000 per incident and could possibly lose their business license. In response to the ordinance, several civil groups including the ACLU and People for the American Way took or contemplated legal actions against the ordinance.[95][96]

In August 2007, the ordinance was repealed, and some have speculated that the exodus of over 1,000 immigrants from Riverside to other New Jersey townships was a major factor.[97] The ordinance repealing the law cited the high cost of defending it against further legal challenges.[98]

Notable people[edit]

Many people born in Riverside Township were born at Zurbrugg Hospital during a period of about 75 years beginning in 1915.[99] People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Riverside Township include:

References[edit]

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  3. ^ a b c Government, Township of Riverside. Accessed August 24, 2018.
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  23. ^ Areas touching Riverside Township, MapIt. Accessed December 28, 2014.
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  40. ^ January 22, 2018, Regular Meeting Minutes, Riverside Township. Accessed August 24, 2018. "Robert R. Prisco - Letter of Resignation from the Township Committee due to an appointment as a Workers' Compensation Judge.... Motion made by Messrs. Frey and Miller to appoint Frederick Michael Hart to the Township Committee to fill a vacancy which was created by the resignation of Robert R. Prisco."
  41. ^ McHale, Todd. [Timothy M. LeConey http://www.burlingtoncountytimes.com/ab66d3be-4de9-11e6-974a-17e6f7674926.html "Riverside Township Committee appoints new member"], Burlington County Times, July 19, 2016. Accessed November p, 2017. "A software developer has been named the newest member of the Township Committee. Jason Frey was appointed at Monday’s meeting to fill the vacancy left by Timothy LeConey.... Deputy Mayor Lorraine Hatcher, who ran with LeConey twice, said her former running mate had to step down because he plans to relocate out of town."
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  84. ^ Riverside Township School District 2016 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed May 30, 2017. "The School District educates approximately 1,400 students. The district has a very positive and cooperative send/receive relationship with the Delanco Public Schools. Students from Delanco are educated in their local K-8 District, and then subsequently attend grades 9-12 at Riverside High School."
  85. ^ Coppock, Kristen. "Delanco schools look to eliminate staff", Burlington County Times, March 24, 2010. Accessed July 18, 2013. "Students in grades nine to 12 attend Riverside High School under a sending agreement."
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External links[edit]

Preceded by
Delanco Township
Bordering communities
of Philadelphia
Succeeded by
Delran Township