Road Apples (album)

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Road Apples
Road Apples.jpg
Studio album by The Tragically Hip
ReleasedFebruary 19, 1991
RecordedBarris Studios (New Orleans)
September 1990
Genre
Length49:08
Label
ProducerDon Smith
The Tragically Hip chronology
Up to Here
(1989)
Road Apples
(1991)
Fully Completely
(1992)
Singles from Road Apples
  1. "Little Bones"
  2. "Three Pistols"
  3. "Twist My Arm"
  4. "Long Time Running"
  5. "On the Verge"
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic4/5 stars[1]
PopMatters(8/10)[2]

Road Apples is the second studio album by Canadian rock band The Tragically Hip, and it was their first to reach  No. 1 in Canada.[3] The album has been certified Diamond in Canada.[4] It contains twelve tracks including “Cordelia”, "Three Pistols", “Little Bones,” and “Twist My Arm." During the Hip's last tour, in 2016, songs from this album were played live on a regular basis, featuring the above mentioned songs as well as ”Long Time Running”, “Last of the Unplucked Gems”, “The Luxury”, and “Fiddler's Green.” References to many Canadians were used, including Tom Thompson and Jacques Cousteau, as well as political situations in Sault Ste. Marie Ontario. The track “Fiddler's Green" was written for Gord Downie’s young nephew, who died during the writing of the album. Because of the personal nature of the song, the Hip did not play it live often, but they played it on a regular basis during their final tour. [5]

The album's original working title was Saskadelphia, but this was rejected by the record label as likely to confuse listeners.[6]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by The Tragically Hip.

No.TitleLength
1."Little Bones"4:44
2."Twist My Arm"3:54
3."Cordelia"4:10
4."The Luxury"3:38
5."Born in the Water"3:24
6."Long Time Running"4:23
7."Bring It All Back"4:39
8."Three Pistols"3:48
9."Fight"5:58
10."On the Verge"3:54
11."Fiddler's Green"4:25
12."The Last of the Unplucked Gems"2:03

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allmusic review
  2. ^ PopMatters review
  3. ^ "Top Albums/CDs – Volume 53, No. 18, April 06 1991". RPM. Retrieved 2010-09-15.
  4. ^ "Canadian Recording Industry Association" (Requires running a searches for Artist). 2010. Retrieved 2010-05-03.
  5. ^ "Dig out the Canadian music". By David Reed, Belleville Intelligencer, June 27, 2014
  6. ^ "Tragically Hip has no identity problem". The Province, March 1, 1991.