Rob Brown (ice hockey)

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For other people with the same name, see Rob Brown.
Rob Brown
Rob Brown 2010-04-08.JPG
Born (1968-04-10) April 10, 1968 (age 48)
Kingston, ON, CAN
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg; 13 st 3 lb)
Position Right Wing
Shot Left
Played for AHL
 Chicago Wolves
IHL
 Chicago Wolves
 Kalamazoo Wings
 Indianapolis Ice
 Phoenix Roadrunners
NHL
 Chicago Blackhawks
 Dallas Stars
 Los Angeles Kings
 Hartford Whalers
 Pittsburgh Penguins
NHL Draft 67th overall, 1986
Pittsburgh Penguins
Playing career 1987–2003

Robert William Brown (born April 10, 1968) is a retired professional ice hockey right winger who played in the National Hockey League for eleven seasons between 1987 and 2000. Brown was born in Kingston, Ontario, but grew up in St. Albert, Alberta.

Playing career[edit]

Brown was a prolific scorer at the junior level, averaging over two points per game during his junior career. In particular, Brown flourished in 1986-87 winning multiple awards including Most Valuable Player (West), Top Scorer (West), and the inaugural WHL Plus-Minus Award. Brown also set the current Western Hockey League records for both assists and points with 136 and 212 respectively. He was also named CHL Player of the Year for the 1986-87 season. Brown won a gold medal as part of the team Canada sent to the 1988 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships.

Brown was drafted 67th overall by the Pittsburgh Penguins in the 1986 NHL Entry Draft. His best statistical NHL season was the 1988–89 season, when he played on a line with Mario Lemieux; placing fifth in league scoring, he set career highs with 49 goals, 66 assists, 115 points, 24 power play goals, 6 game-winning goals, and a +27 plus/minus rating. He was also the starting Right Winger for the 40th National Hockey League All-Star Game. The next season he scored at a point per game average, registering 80 points in 80 games. Brown was traded on December 21, 1990 to the Hartford Whalers for Scott Young. In parts of two seasons, Brown had 73 points in 86 games for the Whalers before being traded on January 24, 1992 to the Chicago Blackhawks in exchange for Steve Konroyd. Brown finished the 1991-92 season playing 25 games for Chicago registering 16 points. In 1992-93, Brown split time with the Chicago Blackhawks and their minor league team the Indianapolis Ice. During the next few years, Brown would sign contracts with the Dallas Stars and Los Angeles Kings, but mostly played in the IHL. Brown lead the IHL in scoring for three years and was awarded the James Gatschene Memorial Trophy for league MVP in 1993-94. His scoring production at the IHL level did not go unnoticed and on October 1, 1997 Brown returned to the Pittsburgh Penguins by signing a contract as a free agent. Brown played the next three seasons there; playing a total of 190 games while contributing 87 points. Brown then returned to the minors, ending his career with the Chicago Wolves of the AHL in 2003.

Currently, Brown serves as colour commentator for the Edmonton Oilers pay-per-view, and as an analyst for 630 CHED for Edmonton Oilers games.

A fight between Brown and Sylvain Lefebvre triggered a famous catchphrase in Toronto Maple Leaf history by announcer Joe Bowen, "Down goes Brown", which was later used to name a prominent blog by a Leafs fan.

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular Season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1982–83 St. Albert Sabres AMHL 61 137 122 259 200
1983–84 St. Albert Saints AJHL 1 0 0 0 0
1983–84 Kamloops Jr. Oilers WHL 50 16 42 58 80 15 1 2 3 17
1984–85 Kamloops Blazers WHL 60 29 50 79 95 15 8 8 26 28
1985–86 Kamloops Blazers WHL 69 58 115 173 171 16 18 28 46 14
1986–87 Kamloops Blazers WHL 63 76 136 212 101 5 6 5 11 6
1987–88 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 51 24 20 44 56
1988–89 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 68 49 66 115 118 11 5 3 8 22
1989–90 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 80 33 47 80 102
1990–91 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 25 6 10 16 31
1990–91 Hartford Whalers NHL 44 18 24 42 101 5 1 0 1 7
1991–92 Hartford Whalers NHL 42 16 15 31 39
1991–92 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 25 5 11 16 34 8 2 4 6 4
1992–93 Indianapolis Ice IHL 19 14 19 33 32 2 0 1 1 2
1992–93 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 15 1 6 7 33
1993–94 Kalamazoo Wings IHL 79 42 113 155 188 5 1 3 4 6
1993–94 Dallas Stars NHL 1 0 0 0 0
1994–95 Phoenix Roadrunners IHL 69 34 73 107 135 9 4 12 16 0
1994–95 Los Angeles Kings NHL 2 0 0 0 0
1995–96 Chicago Wolves IHL 79 52 91 143 100 9 4 11 15 6
1996–97 Chicago Wolves IHL 76 37 80 117 98 4 2 4 6 16
1997–98 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 82 15 25 40 59 6 1 0 1 4
1998–99 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 58 13 11 24 16 13 2 5 7 8
1999–00 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 50 10 13 23 10 11 1 2 3 0
2000–01 Chicago Wolves IHL 75 24 53 77 99 16 4 13 17 26
2001–02 Chicago Wolves AHL 80 29 54 83 103 25 7 26 33 34
2002–03 Chicago Wolves AHL 59 15 48 63 83 9 1 6 7 6
NHL totals 543 190 248 438 599 54 12 14 26 45
IHL totals 139 44 102 146 186 34 8 32 40 40
AHL totals 400 203 429 632 652 45 15 44 59 56
WHL totals 242 179 343 522 447 51 33 53 86 65

International play[edit]

  • Played for Team Canada in the 1988 World Junior Championships (Gold medal).

International play[edit]

Medal record
Men's ice hockey
Representing Canada Canada
World Junior Championships
Gold medal – first place 1988 Soviet Union

International statistics

Year Team Event GP G A Pts PIM
1988 Canada WJC 7 6 2 8 2

See also[edit]

External links[edit]


Awards
Preceded by
Cliff Ronning
WHL West Player of the Year
1986, 1987
Succeeded by
Joe Sakic
Preceded by
Luc Robitaille
CHL Player of the Year
1987
Succeeded by
Joe Sakic
Preceded by
Tony Hrkac
James Gatschene Memorial Trophy
1994
Succeeded by
Tommy Salo
Preceded by
Tony Hrkac
Stéphane Morin
Leo P. Lamoureux Memorial Trophy
1994
1996, 1997
Succeeded by
Stéphane Morin
Patrice Lefebvre