Robert A. King (composer)

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Robert A. King
Born(1862-09-20)September 20, 1862
DiedApril 13, 1932(1932-04-13) (aged 69)
Other namesMary Earl,
Betty Chapin,
Robert A. Keiser
Occupationcomposer and lyricist
Years active1900-1932
Notable work
Lafayette, We Hear you Calling,
Beautiful Ohio

Robert A. King (September 20, 1862 – April 13, 1932) was a prolific early twentieth century American composer, who wrote under pen names including the pen names, Mary Earl[1][2][3][4][5], Robert A. Keiser,[6] and Betty Chapin.[7]

Career[edit]

In January 1903, King managed the Teachers' Department for Leo Feist Inc., one of Tin Pan Alley's music publishers.[8]

His first hit was ‘’Anona.’’[1] He collaborated musically with Ballard Macdonald, Billy Moll, Ted Fiorito, Howard Johnson, Gus Kahn,[9] and Charley Straight.[10]

In 1918, King as Mary Earl composed Beautiful Ohio with lyrics by Ballard Macdonald. A chart topper during the year of its release, it sold more than five million copies for publisher Shapiro, Bernstein, & Company.[11]

Selected works[edit]

  • You're the Only One (1900)[7]
  • My Moonbeam Babe (1901)[7]
  • De Sandman's Coming 'round (1901)[7]
  • Beyond the Gates of Paradise (1901)[7]
  • Anona (1903)
  • The Daisy and the Butterfly (1902)[7]
  • An Afternoon Tea (1903)[7]
  • Tell Me, Pretty Maiden (1903)[7]
  • With Robert Recker. Zenobie: march and two step. (1904) OCLC 11185049
  • Romany Waltz[7]
  • Gee! What a Wonderful Time We'll Have When the Boys Come Home (1917) OCLC 20119914
  • My Sweetheart is Somewhere in France[7]
  • ’’Lafayette, We Hear you Calling’’ (1918)[12][13]
  • From Valley Forge to France (1918) OCLC 84533041
  • With Ballard MacDonald. Beautiful Ohio (1918) Arranged for dance orchestra by Bob Haring in 1936. OCLC 696390859
  • Cheer Up, Mother (1918)
  • ’’Dreamy Alabama’’ (1919)
  • Ruspana (1919)[7]
  • Wild flower (1920))[7]
  • ’’In Old Manila’’ (1920) OCLC 26006985
  • ’’Love Bird’’ (1921)[7]
  • Isle of Paradise (1921)[7]
  • I Ain't Nobody's Darling (1921)[7]
  • Just Like a Rainbow (1921)[7]
  • By the Old Ohio Shore (1921)[7]
  • In Rosetime (When We Said Goodbye) (1922)[7]
  • Honeymoon Chimes (1922)[7]
  • I've Got the 'Yes, We Have No Bananas' Blues (1923)[7]
  • Mississippi Ripples (1923)[7]
  • The Clock is Playing (1924)[7]
  • Why Did I Kiss that Girl? (1924)[7]
  • With Charley Straight. I Need Some Pettin` (1924)[10]
  • Peter Pan (I Love You) (1925)[10]
  • Seminola(1925)[10]
  • Keep Your Skirts Down, Mary Ann(1925)[10]
  • Tell Me You Love Me (1926)[10]
  • With Billy Moll, and Howard Johnson. I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream for Ice Cream (1927) and (1928) OCLC 43026474
  • With Marvin Lee. Rocky Mountain Lullaby (1931) OCLC 18861363
  • With Morton Downey, and Sam M. Lewis. An Old Fashioned Home in New Hampshire (1931) OCLC 18852827

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Mary Earl".
  2. ^ "Mary Earl i.e., Robert King".
  3. ^ "WOMEN IN AMERICAN MUSIC, PAGE 2".
  4. ^ WALSH, THOMAS P. (2013). Tin Pan Alley and the Philippines American Songs of War And Love, 1898-1946. Scarecrow Press Inc. p. 245. ISBN 0810886081.
  5. ^ Vogel, Frederick G. (1995). World War I Songs: A History and Dictionary of Popular American Patriotic Tunes with Over 300 Complete Lyrics. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 51. ISBN 0899509525.
  6. ^ Jasen, David A. (1988). Tin Pan Alley: the Composers, the Songs, the Performers, and their Times. New York: Donald I. Fine, INc. pp. 35, 304. ISBN 1556110995.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "Robert King (composer) - Discography of American Historical Recordings". adp.library.ucsb.edu.
  8. ^ Jasen, David A. (1988). Tin Pan Alley: the Composers, the Songs, the Performers, and their Times. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. p. 35. ISBN 1556110995.
  9. ^ "Robert A. King". IMDb.
  10. ^ a b c d e f Jansen, David A. (2004). Tin Pan Alley: An Encyclopedia of the Golden Age of American Song. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 1135949018. Retrieved 17 December 2018.
  11. ^ Jasen, David A. (1988). Tin Pan Alley: the Composers, the Songs, the Performers and their Times. New York: Donald I. Fine. p. 111. ISBN 1556110995.
  12. ^ "Lafayette: (we hear you calling). - Pritzker Military Museum & Library - Chicago". www.pritzkermilitary.org.
  13. ^ "Lafayette: (we hear you calling) - Pritzker Military Museum & Library - Chicago". www.pritzkermilitary.org.