Robert Baldock

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Robert Baldock

Lord Chancellor of England
In office
1323–1326
MonarchEdward II
Preceded byJohn Salmon
Succeeded byJohn Hotham
Lord Privy Seal of England
In office
1320–1323
MonarchEdward II
Preceded byThomas Charlton
Succeeded byRobert Wodehouse
Archdeacon of Middlesex
In office
1315–1326
MonarchEdward II
Preceded byRichard Newport
Succeeded byRoger de Hales
Personal details
Died28 May 1327
Newgate Prison

Robert Baldock (or de Baldock; died 28 May 1327) was the Lord Privy Seal and Lord Chancellor of England, during the reign of King Edward II of England.

Career[edit]

Baldock was archdeacon of Middlesex when he was named Controller of the Wardrobe and Lord Privy Seal on 27 January 1320[1] and then Prebend of Aylesbury in August 1320.[2] He remained Lord Privy Seal until 8 July 1323,[1] before being named Lord Chancellor of England on 20 August 1323.[3]

Baldock was elected Bishop of Norwich on 23 July 1325,[4] but before consecration resigned the office on 3 September 1325 to avoid a collision between the pope and the King.[5]

In October 1326, Baldock was one of the small number of supporters who fled London with King Edward when Queen Isabella and Roger Mortimer invaded. He remained with the King and the Despensers, the King's particular favorites, in their flight across England to the Despensers' lands in Wales, and was one of the last handful who attempted to cross to Ireland and failed.[6] He and the King remained fugitives until their hiding place was revealed. Baldock lost his offices and was imprisoned in November 1326.

Death[edit]

Unlike the Despensers, who suffered quick trials and executions, Baldock was a clergyman, and so in February 1327 was sent to London for trial by fellow clergy.[5] He was placed under house arrest at Hereford Palace (the Bishop of Hereford's London residence).[7] A mob broke into the house, severely beat him, and threw him into Newgate Prison, where he was murdered by some of the inmates.[8]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Fryde et al. 1986, p. 93.
  2. ^ King 1962, pp. 24–27.
  3. ^ Fryde et al. 1986, p. 86.
  4. ^ Fryde et al. 1986, p. 261.
  5. ^ a b Foss 1870, p. 51.
  6. ^ Mortimer 2010, p. 157.
  7. ^ Campbell 1848, p. 206.
  8. ^ Mortimer 2010, p. 162.

References[edit]

  • Campbell, John (1848). The Lives of the Lord Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal of England. Volume 1. London: John Murray.
  • Foss, Edward (1870). Biographia Juridica: A Biographical Dictionary of the Judges of England. London: John Murray.
  • Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I., eds. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd, reprinted 2003 ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X.
  • King, H. P. F. (1962). "Prebendaries: Aylesbury". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1300–1541. Volume 1: Lincoln Diocese. Institute of Historical Research. pp. 24–27.
  • Mortimer, Ian (2010). The Greatest Traitor. London: Vintage Books. ISBN 9780099552222.
Political offices
Preceded by
Thomas Charlton
Lord Privy Seal of England
1320–1323
Succeeded by
Robert Wodehouse
Preceded by
John Salmon
Lord Chancellor of England
1323–1326
Succeeded by
John Hotham
Religious titles
Preceded by
Richard Newport
Archdeacon of Middlesex
1315–1326
Succeeded by
Roger de Hales
Preceded by
John Salmon
as Bishop of Norwich
Bishop-elect of Norwich
1325
Succeeded by
William Ayermin
as Bishop of Norwich