Robert Bosch Stiftung

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Main office of the Robert Bosch Stiftung, Stuttgart

The Robert Bosch Stiftung GmbH (German for 'Robert Bosch Foundation') is a German Stiftung, a type of charitable institution. It owns a majority shareholding in Robert Bosch GmbH, from which it derives its funding. In accordance with the wishes of Robert Bosch, who died in 1942, it conducts and finances social, cultural and scientific projects. In an average year, some eight hundred projects are active, in fields including natural and social sciences, public health, education, and cultural and international relations.[1]:1325

History[edit]

In 1921, when Robert Bosch drew up his will, he established the Vermögensverwaltung Bosch GmbH, with instructions to the directors to decide within thirty years of his death whether or not his shares in Robert Bosch GmbH should be transferred into it. Bosch died in 1942, and this transfer took place in 1964. In 1969 the name was changed from Vermögensverwaltung Bosch to Robert Bosch Stiftung.[1]:1325

In 2007 the holding of the Stiftung in Robert Bosch GmbH was approximately 92% of the issued stock. The work of the foundation is financed by income from it.[1]:1325

Work[edit]

The Stiftung both conducts and finances social, cultural and scientific projects, in accordance with the wishes of Robert Bosch. In an average year, some eight hundred projects are active, in fields including natural and social sciences, public health, education, and cultural and international relations.[1]:1325

It operates the Robert-Bosch-Krankenhaus (Robert Bosch Hospital) in the city of Stuttgart. A research institute within the hospital, the Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institut für Klinische Pharmakologie (Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch Institute for Clinical Pharmacology), was established by Margarete Fischer-Bosch [de] in 1973.[citation needed] The Institut für Geschichte der Medizin (Institute for the History of Medicine) is the archive of the foundation.[citation needed]

The Stiftung has four subsidiary foundations: the Hans-Walz-Stiftung, which funds naturopathic treatment; the Otto und Edith Mühlschlegel-Stiftung, for projects related to aging; the DVA-Stiftung, for Franco-German cultural relations; and the Rochus und Beatrice Wummert Stiftung, which provides study grants to students from Eastern Europe.[1]:1325

In 2014, the Robert Bosch Stiftung established the Berlin-based Robert Bosch Academy, a multidisciplinary institution that invites distinguished public intellectuals and thinkers from across the world to be Richard von Weizsäcker Fellows in Berlin.

From 1964 to 2017, the foundation provided 1.6 billion euros in funding.[2] In 2017, it issued grants worth 100.5 million euros.[3] It is a member of the Network of European Foundations for Innovative Cooperation (NEF).[4]

The foundation is involved in work to modernise the German healthcare system. In particular it is trying to develop more small health centres.[5]

Each year, the Robert Bosch Stiftung issues three Co-Production Prizes for joint film productions by young German filmmakers and their partners from the Arab countries. Until 2015 the Prize was awarded to filmmakers from Germany and Eastern Europe.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Helmut K. Anheier, Stefan Toepler (editors) (2009). International Encyclopedia of Civil Society. New York, New York: Springer Science and Business Media. ISBN 9780387939964.
  2. ^ "About the Robert Bosch Stiftung". Robert Bosch Stiftung.
  3. ^ "2017 Report". Robert Bosch Stiftung.
  4. ^ "Network of European Foundations (NEF)" (PDF). Network of European Foundations (NEF). Oct 25, 2007. p. 5. Retrieved April 4, 2014.
  5. ^ "NHS Health Check: How Germany's healthcare system works". BBC News. 9 February 2017. Retrieved 10 February 2017.
  6. ^ Stiftung, Robert Bosch. "Robert Bosch Stiftung - The Film Prize for International Cooperation". www.bosch-stiftung.de. Retrieved 2016-03-09.

External links[edit]