Robert C. De Large

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Robert C. DeLarge
Robert C. DeLarge - Brady-Handy.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from South Carolina's 2nd district
In office
March 4, 1871 - January 24, 1873
Preceded by Christopher C. Bowen
Succeeded by Alonzo J. Ransier
Member of the South Carolina House of Representatives from Charleston County
In office
November 24, 1868 – March 1, 1870
Personal details
Born (1842-03-15)March 15, 1842
Aiken, South Carolina
Died February 14, 1874(1874-02-14) (aged 31)
Charleston, South Carolina
Political party Republican
Profession farmer, politician

Robert Carlos De Large (March 14, 1842 – February 14, 1874) was a politician and Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from South Carolina, serving 1871 to 1873. He was earlier a delegate to the 1868 state constitutional convention and elected in 1868 to the state house of representatives for one term.

Early life and education[edit]

De Large was born in Aiken, South Carolina on March 15, 1842, the mixed-race son of a free woman of color and a Sephardi Jewish father, according to scholar Benjamin Ginsberg.[1] Timothy P. McCarthy suggests both parents were mulatto or mixed race, the mother a refugee from Haiti. They were slaveholders and part of the mulatto elite of Charleston, South Carolina.[2] De Large’s parents’ names are not known, but his father was a tailor and his mother a seamstress. His parents encouraged his education, sending him to North Carolina for primary school; he returned to Charleston and graduated from Wood High School. De Large became a tailor and farmer. As a young man, De Large became a member of the Brown Fellowship Society of Charleston, made up of people of color who had been free before the war. They were among the elite African Americans in the city who were skilled artisans and led the people of color.

During the war, De Large was employed by the Confederate Navy. He saved considerable sums and established a stake for after the war. At that time, he became involved in politics, and was elected as a delegate to the South Carolina constitutional convention in 1868. That year he was also elected as a Republican member of the South Carolina House of Representatives, serving one term until 1870. In 1870 he was elected State land commissioner, and was also one of the commissioners of the State's sinking fund. De Large was elected to the US House of Representatives later that year.

He served in the US House of Representatives from March 4, 1871 until January 24, 1873. At that time, Congress declared the seat vacant as the result of an election challenge by his Republican opponent Christopher C. Bowen. The Election Committee of the House found there so many 'abuses and irregularities' on both sides during the election that determining a victor was impossible. In addition, it found that De Large had maintained two positions in South Carolina government that were incompatible with his role as a congressman.[3] On January 18, 1873, the committee declared the seat vacant for the rest of the 42nd Congress, set to adjourn in March, and gained agreement by the full House.[3]

After leaving Congress, De Large served as a local magistrate until his death of tuberculosis in Charleston on February 14, 1874 at the age of 31.[4]

He is buried in the Brown Fellowship Graveyard.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ginsberg, Benjamin. Moses of South Carolina: A Jewish Scalawag During Radical Reconstruction, (Johns Hopkins University Press; 2010), p. 9
  2. ^ Timothy P. McCarthy, “De Large, Robert Carlos,” American National Biography 6 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999): 383–384 (hereinafter referred to as ANB).
  3. ^ a b Chester H. Rowell, A Historical and Legal Digest of All the Contested Election Cases (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1901): 282, at Internet Archive, Cornell University Library
  4. ^ Robert Carlos De Large (1842–1874), Virginia Memory, Library of Virginia

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Christopher C. Bowen
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from South Carolina's 2nd congressional district

1871-1873
Succeeded by
Alonzo J. Ransier