Robert Day (director)

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Robert Day
Born (1922-09-11) 11 September 1922 (age 93)
Sheen, England
Occupation Film director
Years active 1956-1991
Spouse(s) Eileen Pamela Day (1948[1]-1969; divorce; 1 child) Dorothy Provine (1968-2010; her death; 1 child)
Children Roberta Jane Simons (15 Oct 52[2]) Robert Day Jr. (28 May 69)

Robert Day (born 11 September 1922) is an English film director. He directed more than 40 films between 1956 and 1991. Day was born in Sheen, England.

Day worked his way up from clapper boy to camera operator, then cinematographer, in his native England, and began directing in the mid-1950s. His first film as director, the black-comic The Green Man (1956) for the writer-producer team of Frank Launder and Sidney Gilliat, garnered fine reviews[citation needed] and a classic notoriety. Using this as a starting point, Day went on to become one of the industry's busiest directors. He relocated to Hollywood in the 1960s and directed many TV episodes and made-for-TV movies. He occasionally had small parts in his own productions, including The Haunted Strangler (1958), Two Way Stretch (1960), the TV mini-series Peter and Paul (1981).

In the 1970s and 1980s, Day would direct episodes for numerous American television shows, including Barnaby Jones, The F.B.I., Dallas, Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color, and Matlock.

Personal life[edit]

Day was married to Eileen Day[3] and then, following their divorce, to actress Dorothy Provine until her death.

Selected filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Births, Deaths and Marriages". Births, Deaths and Marriages Recorded in Hatfield Jan - Mar 1948. SEY-SHA: 169. 1948. Retrieved 23 November 2015. 
  2. ^ "Births Registered in October, November and December". Births, Deaths and Marriages DAY: 254. Retrieved 23 November 2015. 
  3. ^ "Births, Deaths and Marriages". Births, Deaths and Marriages Recorded in Hatfield Jan - Mar 1948. SEY-SHA: 169. 1948. Retrieved 23 November 2015. 

External links[edit]