Robert E. Huffman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Dr. Robert E. Huffman (1931–2008) was an American space scientist and author. He specialized in ultraviolet spectroscopy in the earth's upper atmosphere. Working for the United States Air Force, Dr. Huffman managed the Horizon Ultraviolet Program (HUP)[1] experiments on two Space Shuttle flights: Columbia (STS-4, 1982) and Discovery (AFP-675 on STS-39, 1991).

Dr. Huffman was also the principal investigator for the Auroral Ionospheric Mapper (AIM) on the HILAT Spacecraft[2] and the Auroral/Ionospheric Remote Sensor (AIRS) on the Polar BEAR Spacecraft.[3] In 1983 the Auroral Ionospheric Mapper produced the first pictures of Aurora Borealis made under full daylight conditions. Although the aurora cannot be seen in the visible spectrum during daylight hours, Dr. Huffman's instrument was able to capture an image in the ultraviolet spectrum.[4]

In the early 1970s Dr. Huffman was Program Manager for Project Chaser, a series of launches of Aerobee 170 sounding rockets from Vandenberg AFB Probe Launch Complex C. The purpose of Project Chaser was to measure exhaust plumes from anti-ballistic missile systems launched simultaneously with Project Chaser.[5]

His memoir "Adventures of a Star Warrior: Cold War Rocket Science on the Space Frontier" was published posthumously.

Awards[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Horizon Ultraviolet Program". NASA National Space Science Data Center. 
  2. ^ "Auroral Ionospheric Mapper on HILAT Spacecraft". NASA National Space Science Data Center. 
  3. ^ "Auroral/Ionospheric Remote Sensor on Polar BEAR Spacecraft". NASA National Space Science Data Center. 
  4. ^ "83-HC-635 Crescent of colors across Hudson Bay in northern Canada". National Archives. 
  5. ^ "Project Chaser: Photometer Sensor Package" (PDF). Defense Technology Information Center. 
  6. ^ "Class of '53 Newsletter" (PDF). Texas A&M University Association of Former Students. 
  7. ^ Liebowitz, Ruth P. "CHRONOLOGY From the Cambridge Field Stations to the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory 1945-1985". Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts 01731: Air Force Geophysics Laboratory. p. 115 (Appendix E). Archived from the original on 2013-12-19. Retrieved 18 December 2013. 
  8. ^ Liebowitz, Ruth P. "CHRONOLOGY From the Cambridge Field Stations to the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory 1945-1985". Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts 01731: Air Force Geophysics Laboratory. p. 116 (Appendix E). Archived from the original on 2013-12-19. Retrieved 18 December 2013.