Robert Edward Cox

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Robert Edward Cox
Born (1876-12-22)December 22, 1876
St. Albans, West Virginia
Died April 24, 1937(1937-04-24) (aged 60)
Place of burial Rose Hill Cemetery Altoona, Pennsylvania
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Navy
Rank Chief Gunner's Mate
Unit USS Missouri (BB-11)
Battles/wars Spanish–American War
Awards Medal of Honor

Robert Edward Cox (December 22, 1876 – April 24, 1937) was a sailor serving in the United States Navy who received the Medal of Honor for bravery.

Biography[edit]

Cox was born December 22, 1876 in St. Albans, West Virginia and after joining the navy was stationed aboard the USS Missouri (BB-11). On April 13, 1904 the Missouri was engaging in target practice when one of the ships 12" gun "flared back". As the breech was opened for reloading, hot gases were released into the turret, causing it to catch fire. The fire spread to a bag of propellant and from there it spread down to the ammunition handling chamber. Cox along with 2 gunners mates contained the fire before it spread to other areas of the ship and in putting out the blaze. The fire was eventually contained but before it was out 36 of the ship's crew were dead. For his actions received the Medal of Honor May 26, 1904. For his actions received the Medal of Honor April 14, 1921.[1][2][3]

He died April 24, 1937 and is buried in Rose Hill Cemetery Altoona, Pennsylvania.[4] His grave can be found in section F, lot 6.[4]

Medal of Honor citation[edit]

Rank and organizarion: Chief Gunner's Mate, U.S. Navy. Born: 22 December 1855, St. Albans, W. Va. Accredited to: West Virginia. G.O. No.: 43, 14 April 1921. (Medal presented by President Harding.)

Citation:

For extraordinary heroism on U.S.S. Missouri 13 April 1904. While at target practice off Pensacola, Fla., an accident occurred in the after turret of the Missouri whereby the lives of 5 officers and 28 men were lost. The ship was in imminent danger of destruction by explosion, and the prompt action of C.G. Cox and 2 gunners' mates caused the fire to be brought under control, and the loss of the Missouri, together with her crew, was averted.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Interim Awards, 1901-1911; Cox, Robert Edward entry". Medal of Honor recipients. United States Army Center of Military History. August 3, 2009. Retrieved October 8, 2010. 
  2. ^ "USS Missouri (BB-11), 1903-1922, Selected Views". Online Library of Selected Images: -- U.S. NAVY SHIPS --. Naval Historical Center. January 21, 1999. Retrieved October 8, 2010. 
  3. ^ "USS Missouri (BB-11) Turret Fire, 13 April 1904". Online Library of Selected Images: -- U.S. NAVY SHIPS --. Naval Historical Center. January 21, 1999. Retrieved October 8, 2010. 
  4. ^ a b Don Morfe (February 27, 2003). "Robert Edward Cox". Claim to Fame: Medal of Honor recipients. Find a Grave. Retrieved October 8, 2010. 

External links[edit]