Robert Genn

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Robert Genn on location at Lake of the Woods, Ontario

Robert Douglas Genn (May 15, 1936 – May 27, 2014) was a Canadian artist, who gained recognition for his style, which is in the tradition of Canadian landscape painting. He ran a painters' website, which sends out twice weekly newsletters to 135,000 artists. In 2005, Genn campaigned against the Chinese website, arch-world.com, which was selling thousands of high-resolution images of around 2,800 artists' work illegally, without permission. He succeeded to an extent.

Life and work[edit]

Robert Genn was born in Victoria, British Columbia, to an English mother and Scottish father. He studied at Victoria College and the University of British Columbia, then in 1958 at the Art Centre School in Los Angeles.[1] He painted landscapes throughout British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, New Mexico, and Western Europe.[1][2]

Picnic Point to Philip Glass Lake of the Woods, 30" x 34", acrylic on canvas, by Robert Genn.

He identified with and has been compared to the 1920s Canadian Group of Seven.[3] In 1961, he met Lawren Harris who was a neighbour in Point Grey, Vancouver.[4] Genn had problems with painting skies, and Harris's advice was to turn the picture upside-down: "Paint down from the trees to the clouds at the bottom of the picture to get the perspective right."[4] Genn said this was "valuable advice", which enabled him "to control the gradation and work up into the trees in a more abstract manner."[4] He was a practitioner of plein air painting, and he liked to set his easel in the same spot as his predecessors, such as J. E. H. MacDonald in the Canadian Rockies.[5]

He gained recognition for his painting style, which is in the tradition of Canadian landscape painting.[6][7] He ran the Painter's Keys web site, a worldwide artists' community, with his staff and volunteers. The web site sends out a free twice-weekly newsletter, which is sent to 135,000 artists in over 100 countries,[8] and claims the largest collection of art quotes online with over 5,382 authors quoted.[9] His "Ten Commandments of Art Pricing" on his web site (reprinted on About.com) advise starting cheaply, raising prices slowly, keeping them the same for all purchasers and pricing by size.[10]

In 2005, Genn campaigned against the Chinese website, arch-world.com, which was selling thousands of high-resolution images of around 2,800 artists' work illegally, without permission.[4][11] After failing to gain support from the Canadian government or the Chinese embassy in Ottawa,[4] Genn used his web site to enlist subscribers' support to email objections to the arch-world, resulting within days in over 1,000 online complaints from artists, dealers and politicians[11] to the company and governments.[8] This stimulated a diplomatic protest letter to the Chinese Ministry of Commerce, Trading and Law Department from the Canadian Embassy in Beijing.[8] Genn credited the campaign with the subsequent removal of images by 800 Canadian artists from the arch-world,[4] although many works were reinstated on arch-world soon after.[11]

Genn was a member of the Board of Directors at Emily Carr College of Art & Design.[3] In 2006, a retrospective of his work, consisting of 16 paintings sourced from across Canada, was held at the Surrey Art Gallery.[12][13]

Genn announced in his Twice-Weekly Letter of 25 October 2013 that he had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.[14] He died at his Surrey, British Columbia home at 10:20 am on 27 May 2014 according to his daughter Sara Genn in the Twice-Weekly Letter of 30 May 2014.[15][16] Several months after his death, four galleries across Canada held honorary openings of his work.[17]

Books[edit]

Genn wrote three books. In Praise of Painting (2012) is an illustrated autobiography of his early years. The Dreamway (1987) is an account of a meeting with a spiritual seer. The Painter's Keys (2000) is a handbook for painters based on one of his creativity seminars.

Representation and collections[edit]

As of early 2020, 621 works have had auction sales.[18] His work is represented by 12 galleries in Canada.[19] Solo shows include Jenkins Showler Gallery, White Rock; West End Gallery, Edmonton; Hambleton Galleries, Kelowna, The Art Emporium, Vancouver;[3] and Canada House Gallery, Banff, AB.[20] He was one of the 60 elected senior members (SFCA) of the Federation of Canadian Artists (FCA).[7]

His work is in corporate and public collections, including Air Canada, Bank Of Montreal, Canadian General Insurance, Canadian Airlines, Canadian Utilities, The Churchill Corporation, Expo '86, Esso Resources, First City - California II, Highfield Oil & Gas, Molson Brewery Ltd., Montreal Trust, Shell Resources, University of Alberta, Westgate Chevrolet,[3] Glenbow Museum and the Government of Belgium.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b MacDonald, Colin S. (1979). A Dictionary of Canadian Artists. Ottawa: Canadian Paperbacks Publishing Ltd.
  2. ^ Bouchard, Gilbert (18 April 2008). "Painter taps ubiquitous beauty". Edmonton Journal – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  3. ^ a b c d "Artists: Robert Genn". Jenkins Showler gallery. Archived from the original on 6 February 2007. Retrieved 14 February 2007. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ a b c d e f Brennan, Brian (1999). "Homage - Robert Genn". Galleries West. Archived from the original on 15 April 2009. Retrieved 14 September 2009. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ Bouchard, Gilbert (18 April 2008). "Painter taps ubiquitous beauty". Edmonton Journal. Retrieved 13 January 2020 – via Newspapers.com Free to read. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Genn, Robert. "Painting using cues from nature". About.com. Archived from the original on 31 May 2009. Retrieved 15 September 2009. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ a b "Robert Genn, SFCA". Federation of Canadian Artists. Archived from the original on 19 February 2007. Retrieved 14 February 2007. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ a b c Cernetig, Miro (29 December 2005). "Chinese firm 'steals' art by painters here". The Vancouver Sun. Archived from the original on 12 January 2008. Retrieved 15 September 2009. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ "Robert Genn quotes". robertgenn.com. Archived from the original on 3 August 2014. Retrieved 14 February 2007. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ Boddy-Evans, Marion. "The Ten Commandments of Art Pricing". About.com. Archived from the original on 1 February 2009. Retrieved 15 September 2009. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ a b c Whyte, Murray (9 December 2005). "Chinese site rips off art". Toronto Star. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 15 September 2009. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ Browne, Alex (23 April 2006). "Genn Retrospective (part 1)". Surrey Leader. p. 41 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  13. ^ Browne, Alex (23 April 2006). "Genn Retrospective (part 2)". Surrey Leader. p. 42 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  14. ^ Genn, Robert (25 October 2013). "The bomb". Clicks.robertgenn.com. Archived from the original on 31 May 2014. Retrieved 2014-06-05. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  15. ^ Genn, Sara (30 May 2014). "Robert Genn (May 15, 1936 - May 27, 2014)". Clicks.robertgenn.com. Archived from the original on 5 June 2014. Retrieved 5 June 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  16. ^ Alex Browne (2014-05-29). "Noted Canadian landscape artist Robert Genn passes". BCLocalNews.com. Retrieved 2014-06-05. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  17. ^ Griffin, Kevin (23 October 2014). "Surrey artist's life honoured with exhibitions". The Vancouver Sun. Retrieved 13 January 2020 – via Newspapers.com Free to read. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  18. ^ "Robert Genn (1936-2014)". artprice.com. Retrieved 13 January 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  19. ^ "Robert's work is represented by". robertgenn.com. Archived from the original on 4 October 2006. Retrieved 14 February 2007. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  20. ^ a b "Robert Genn SFCA". Canada House Gallery. Archived from the original on 19 February 2007. Retrieved 14 February 2007. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External links[edit]

Video[edit]