Robert Homburg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Robert Homburg
Robert Homburg MP.jpg
10th Leader of the Opposition (SA)
In office
1901–1902
Preceded by Vaiben Louis Solomon
Succeeded by John Darling Jr.
Personal details
Born (1848-03-10)10 March 1848
Died 23 March 1912(1912-03-23)
Political party National Defence League (1892–96),
Australasian National League (1896–05)

Robert Homburg, senior (10 March 1848 – 23 March 1912) was a politician and judge in colonial South Australia. He was a member of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1884 to 1905, representing the electorates of Gumeracha (1884-1902) and Murray (1902-1905). He was Leader of the Opposition from 1901 to 1902 and Attorney-General of South Australia from 1890 to 1892, 1892 to 1893 and 1904 to 1905. His sons Hermann Homburg and Robert Homburg Jr. also served in the House of Assembly, with Hermann also being a long-serving minister.[1]

Homburg was born in Brunswick, Duchy of Brunswick, Germany, the son of Wilhelm Homburg (died 1860), a grain merchant, and his wife Caroline Magdalene Pauline.[1]

Homburg arrived in South Australia in the year 1857. He was employed in a land agency business until 1868, when he was articled to James Boucaut.[2] The last two years of his articles were served in the office of Sir John Downer, and he was admitted to the bar in April 1874.[2]

Homburg was elected to the South Australian House of Assembly as a representative for Gumeracha in April 1884, and at the election of 1887 was re-elected with the Sir Robert Dalrymple Ross.[2] In April 1890 he was again returned with Theodore Hack. In 1880 for a short period he was president of the German Club. He was appointed Attorney-General in Thomas Playford's second Ministry in August 1890, and held office till June 1892, when he retired with his colleagues.[2] Homburg was again Attorney-General from 15 October 1892 to 16 June 1893 and from 4 July 1904 to 24 February 1905 (also being Minister of Education in the latter term).[3] Homburg held the seat of Gumeracha until its abolition at the 1902 election.[3] Homburg served as the tenth Leader of the Opposition from 1901 to 1902. Homburg represented the Assembly for Murray from 1902 until the 1905 election.[3]

Homburg was appointed a justice of the Supreme Court of South Australia in 1905.[1] He died in Medindie, Adelaide on 23 March 1912; he was survived by a total of four sons and four daughters from his two marriages.[1] His sons Hermann (1874-1964) and Robert junior followed him as lawyers and parliamentarians.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Harmstorf, Ian. "Homburg, Robert (1848–1912)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Canberra: Australian National University. 
  2. ^ a b c d Mennell, Philip (1892). "Wikisource link to Homburg, Robert". The Dictionary of Australasian Biography. London: Hutchinson & Co. Wikisource 
  3. ^ a b c "Hon Robert Homburg Snr". Former Member of Parliament Details. Parliament of South Australia. 
Political offices
Preceded by
Henry Downer
Attorney-General of South Australia
1890-1892
Succeeded by
William Stock
Preceded by
William Stock
Attorney-General of South Australia
1892-1893
Succeeded by
Charles Kingston
Preceded by
Vaiben Louis Solomon
Leader of the Opposition of South Australia
1901–1902
Succeeded by
John Darling Jr.
Preceded by
Louis von Doussa
Attorney-General of South Australia
1904-1905
Succeeded by
Archibald Peake
Parliament of South Australia
Preceded by
William Haines
Samuel Tomkinson
Member for Gumeracha
1884–1902
Served alongside: Ross, Stirling, Hack, Randell, Playford, Jamieson
Succeeded by
Electorate abolished
Preceded by
New electorate
Member for Murray
1902–1905
Served alongside: Duncan, Pflaum
Succeeded by
William Jamieson