Robert M. Ayres

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Robert Moss Ayres (August 19, 1898 – August 7, 1977) was an American architect who lived and worked in Texas. He was the son and business partner of Atlee Ayres.

Early life and education[edit]

Ayres was born in San Antonio to Atlee B. Ayres and Olive Moss Ayres. His parents sent him to the private military preparatory San Antonio Academy,[1] and later to the college preparatory Haverford School. Upon graduation from Haverford, he studied architecture with Paul Philippe Cret at the University of Pennsylvania.[2]

Career[edit]

Ayres spent a year with an architectural firm in New York City before returning to San Antonio. In 1921, his father announced he had joined his firm, partnering as Atlee B. and Robert M. Ayres, Architects.[3]

He worked on a number of projects with his father, including the following:[4]

He was president of the San Antonio chapter of the American Institute of Architects.[2]

Personal life[edit]

On December 2, 1925, he married San Antonio socialite and community organizer Florence Collett. The couple had four children. He died on August 7, 1977 and was buried in Mission Burial Park North in San Antonio. Florence died in 1992 and is buried next to him.[13]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "San Antonio Academy". Hdandbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  2. ^ a b Cocke, Stephanie Hetos. "Robert Moss Ayres". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  3. ^ "Personals". The American Architect and Architecture. 120: 416. July 6, 1921. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  4. ^ "Ayres and Ayres, Architects". Alexander Architectural Archive. UT-Austin. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  5. ^ "Monticello Park" (PDF). City of San Antonio. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  6. ^ Sawyer, Ellen. "The McNay Art Museum". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  7. ^ Stuck, Eleanor. "Menger Hotel". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  8. ^ "Smith-Young Tower". Texas Historical Commission. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  9. ^ "Base Administration Building". Texas Historical Commission. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  10. ^ "Nave, Roystan Memorial". Texas Historical Commission. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  11. ^ "Old Cameron County Jail". Texas Historical Commission. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  12. ^ "San Anonio Municipal Auditorium". Texas Historical Commission. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  13. ^ Florence Collett Ayres at Find a Grave

Further reading[edit]

  • Cocke, Stephanie Hetos, "Atlee B. and Robert M. Ayres," Texas Architect, November–December 1989.
  • Frenzel, Paul (1999). Historic Homes of Gonzales. Gonzales, TX: Reese's Printing.

External links[edit]